Search found 196 matches

by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 26, 2004 11:54 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Advocate's
Replies: 5
Views: 2641

Then, you had lawyers, advocati, who knew the legal stuff. They did not talk in court, though. Is this quite right? In civil cases, "court" meant two things. First there were proceedings in front of the praetor, who would prepare a set of instructions for the judge, that is a set of instructions: "...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 11:06 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: greetings and salutations
Replies: 8
Views: 2973

Welcome. The experts are a wonderful resource for non-experts; but let's not forget that we are a wonderful resource for the experts: without questions to answer the experts sit sterile in their ivory towers. It's great that you are so motivated to keep up with your Latin despite your set-backs. I s...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 11:01 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: brand spanking new ;)
Replies: 12
Views: 3034

It seems presumption for one who has been here hardly longer than you to welcome you, but welcome nonetheless. I hope you add to the agoric quality (if there is such a word).
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 9:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2760

That is how I understand it. The reflexive pronoun (and thence the reflexive possessive adjective) is used to refer (a) the the subject of the principal sentence or subordinate clause in which it stands (b) to the subject of the principal sentence if the subordinate clause in which it stands is some...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 9:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2760

Yes. And (so far as I know) yes.
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 8:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2760

In that example, I think, the latter. puella is neither (a) the subject of the principle sentence, nor (b) the subject of the ut clause nor (c) the subject of a verb of saying. So there's nothing reflexive going on, and the possessive adjective should not be reflexive. [I hadn't seen benissimus's po...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 8:28 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: perhaps im dense
Replies: 21
Views: 33006

I think that macrons are great. I feel weaker when I read a text without macrons. And I like to write macrons also. They are pretty. But since every serious text is going to be macronless, they are not any long-term help. And I maintain my aesthetic objection. Latin sets a lovely even line (which i...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 8:13 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Dative of possession
Replies: 3
Views: 1991

Well, I'm not sure there are any rules. Consider the two sentences: Liber est meus "The book is mine" Est mihi liber "I own a/the book" (literally "There is to me a book") The first emphasizes the identity of the owner of the book (whose book is it); it would be even more emphatic if one reversed th...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 25, 2004 6:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Dative of possession
Replies: 3
Views: 1991

Your heading answers the question! The noun or pronoun of the possessor goes in the dative: mihi ; the thing possessed goes in its natural case, here nominative. So mihi deducus or mihi infamia (the latter, I'd have thought, better as contrasting with gloria and for the assonance). Literally: To god...
by Ulpianus
Tue Feb 24, 2004 9:23 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: perhaps im dense
Replies: 21
Views: 33006

You could make almost an opposite argument though. You could say: marking vowels as long means that people don't really bother to learn them at all; but they learn to rely on them as a crutch which is snatched away once they get to real Latin. There's something to be said for marking them in diction...
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 23, 2004 10:15 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Catullus
Replies: 4
Views: 2165

Lots of different metres, I believe, but the majority of poems are either hendecasyllables (mostly in, and most of, the first 58 poem) or elegiacs (65 to 116) with 62 + 64 dactylic hexameter. The rest a variety, in particular a range of different iambics. So I think he falls into the "lot of them" c...
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:15 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help With Phrase Please
Replies: 4
Views: 1867

Hmm. Not sure I like to convert latin for commerce: it's tempting to suggest something like "irrumatores in omnibus" (don't even think about going there, it's very rude indeed and not even good Latin: but would the clients guess?). What about elegans , perhaps with iter : a good positive word in Lat...
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: A stranger in these parts...
Replies: 9
Views: 4117

Doctori Wendy Creed donata glutinatoris intrumenta cultelli acuendi a Ricardo suo.
Nice. Little typo: intrumenta should read instrumenta.
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 22, 2004 2:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Praxis at SLU help?
Replies: 17
Views: 6381

I don't know the book, but if the comments on Amazon about innaccuracy are half-way true, I'd avoid it. You seem to have a pretty competent and accurate approach to grammar anyway, and I doubt you need it to be "made simple". I think it's a bad idea to have too many basic books. You need to find one...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 21, 2004 2:08 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Comparison between suus and is (Exercise 117)
Replies: 9
Views: 7222

I know it's hard, coming from an English background, to grasp the idea that word order is much more flexible in Latin; that there are more tendencies than rules. I thought it might help to show how a bit of "real" Latin exhibits this flexibility. Here is (very slightly adapted to prune some complexi...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 20, 2004 11:25 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Orpheus et Eurydice
Replies: 11
Views: 3211

On your request for a website that teaches hexameter: was this what you were thinking of: Hexametrica (I came across it by chance while looking for something else: it looks rather good).
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 19, 2004 10:12 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Orpheus et Eurydice
Replies: 11
Views: 3211

I managed to find a decent commentary (Mynors) which confirms that you are indeed right; and also (happily for me) agrees that it is odd. He suggests "Ixion's whirling wheel". He has a nice turn of phrase, saying that V has put the elements together "to please himself and not the logicians".
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 19, 2004 9:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Tricky Sentence! I need Help!
Replies: 6
Views: 3344

Of course it's a noun -- sacrum indeed. I was not suggesting that Latin treats it as an adjective and silently assumes a noun, merely that English requires a noun (things) since in English sacred is an adjective and sacreds is odd. But (1) it can't be rites, because you can't carry them! (2) Vessels...
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 19, 2004 9:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Tricky Sentence! I need Help!
Replies: 6
Views: 3344

Yes. Perhaps sacred things. And the gate may be a door.
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 19, 2004 6:37 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Orpheus et Eurydice
Replies: 11
Views: 3211

I'm sure you're right, and it must be genitive of orbis -is. Strange sense though: one would rather expect orbis rotae (with orbis nominative) than rota orbis , and the position of Ixionii near rota lulls one into assuming it is a genitive associated with rota when it really turns out to be a geniti...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 18, 2004 11:13 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: AVATAR
Replies: 28
Views: 7352

Is this the face that launched a thousand ships?
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 18, 2004 11:09 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Orpheus et Eurydice
Replies: 11
Views: 3211

Nice translation of a lovely passage. I think ubi in (1) is "whenever", i.e. the birds flocking off to safety is something that has often happened. This makes the simile work. I do have a question though. What do you make of orbis in the line Ixonii vento rota constituit orbis ? As a noun it seems s...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 18, 2004 8:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need help translating?
Replies: 6
Views: 3029

No ... and yes. What you say is absolutely correct of the most classical of classical Latin, and if you were translating English to Latin you should certainly use the present indicative with dum meaning while. But in later Latin dum meaning while becomes assimilated to temporal cum , and is commonly...
by Ulpianus
Tue Feb 17, 2004 11:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6503

I am sorry that it should be thought that I "dismissed" Cicero, lightly or at all. I did not intend to. And one may well assume that his rhetoric convinced his listeners. As an intellectual exercise (for him, for us) it is great. The style has long been admired as the acme of latinity, and with reas...
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 16, 2004 9:35 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Praxis at SLU help?
Replies: 17
Views: 6381

Ingrid's idea makes sense. The drafter of these sentences seems to have a total fixation with "liber" in its various guises (along with vice, guilt, the relative merits of the Greeks and Romans, and gender inclusive language). All very 21st century!
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 16, 2004 9:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: language speech problem
Replies: 6
Views: 2914

talia timeo = I'm scared of things like that.
by Ulpianus
Mon Feb 16, 2004 1:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Praxis at SLU help?
Replies: 17
Views: 6381

vitia liberorum liberarumque tolerare possum. We can endure the evils of free men and free women. Possum is singular: "I can" (we would be possumus). Is liberi (a word with which the writer of these sentences appears to have an obsession) here being used for children (plural, so it could be)? I'm n...
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 15, 2004 10:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: having trouble with this imperative
Replies: 5
Views: 3137

The 2 sg imp of memini is regularly memento . Praeterita when used of the past is actually a neuter plural (sg praeteritum ): it's perfectly acceptable and regular to use this plural ("past events") though it would also be OK to use a (neuter) singular. The answer you're getting from your crib is th...
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 15, 2004 10:27 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #4 Answers
Replies: 13
Views: 5461

Standard in Latin were much higher in those days --- for the few who got that sort of education, and at least with respect to those things they studied. Nowadays, English->Latin is little studied (even at A-level), and linguistic standards are probably lower. This may or may not be compensated by (a...
by Ulpianus
Sun Feb 15, 2004 5:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #4 Answers
Replies: 13
Views: 5461

Quis tredecim est annos natus? Quid dicere vis? Strange as it may now seem to us, the early parts of N&H were intended for use in the "early forms", by which I understand the early forms of public school, i.e. in their day 13 year olds or so. To that extent, they properly tend to emphasize drill an...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 14, 2004 10:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #4 Answers
Replies: 13
Views: 5461

Uh no for your own health review sequence of tenses love Not quite fair. Helen's point is that the sequence of tenses rules do not strictly apply in consecutive clauses, one is free to select tenses that seem best to fit the meaning. She is (except, I think, for Caesar) right. On the other hand one...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 14, 2004 9:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need help translating?
Replies: 6
Views: 3029

Something along these lines: When peaceful silence encloses everything, and night is at the half-way point of the journey along its course, then, Lord, your discourse from the royal dwelling-places is all-powerful. There is no express verb in the main sentence. One can understand esse as I have (the...
by Ulpianus
Sat Feb 14, 2004 9:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Praxis at SLU help?
Replies: 17
Views: 6381

That's quite a chunk of answers to check, and I don't promise I haven't missed something, but they look basically right to me. It might be better if you posted only those you were really doubtful about. Two tiny points: 1. Watch the imperfect, which you are quite habitually translating with a simple...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 13, 2004 9:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: [Translation]
Replies: 3
Views: 1859

A strange idea of fun ...

me ipsum in quattuor partes, ludi causa, detraxi

or (perhaps better)

in quattuor partes, ludi causa, a me ipso detractus sum

(or detracta if you are a woman)
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 13, 2004 8:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6503

You say Caesar's writing is characterised by simplicity . . . to the extent that "simplicity" is meant as a somewhat disparaging qualification, I couldn't disagree more. The simplicity, as such, I think altogether admirable. Perhaps "simple purity" (in a purely grammatical sense) would be better. B...
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 13, 2004 6:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6597

Since we seem to be some way off the original topic, I have posted my reply regarding Caesar in a new thread.
by Ulpianus
Fri Feb 13, 2004 6:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6503

Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?

This started in another thread, but it seems to have acquired a life of its own and I thought I would spin it off. Original thread is here: http://www.textkit.com/greek-latin-forum/viewtopic.php?t=1397 . MickeyV wrote: Say, Ulpianus, do you propose that Caesar's writing is, for the modern Latinist, ...
by Ulpianus
Thu Feb 12, 2004 8:32 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6597

I wasn't trying to say whether it is easier or harder than other languages. I'm sure it is easier than some, and harder than others. But I do not think that for an English speaker Latin could be described as easy: compared to Russian, to Chinese, to Sanskrit, to Arabic, even to Greek ... perhaps. It...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 11, 2004 11:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6597

thanks.....even your "Beginner" stuff seems too high up for me I got some work to do There's no hiding the fact that it is hard, and it will take effort. Latin is a tough language, especially if it is your first contact with heavily inflected languages. But Episcopus is right: if you put that effor...
by Ulpianus
Wed Feb 11, 2004 10:32 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Exercise 245 Part II
Replies: 3
Views: 3761

Looks wrong to me, as if whoever wrote the key was trying to treat is as an adjective and make it agree with verbis (dative plural). I'd think eius. The word order looks oddly English too.