Search found 716 matches

by Kasper
Wed Aug 13, 2008 2:12 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Lingua Latina, Familia Romana, p8
Replies: 11
Views: 4891

I have never seen any Lingua Latina book, but wouldn't the book show the nominative and genitive singular of nouns, rather than nominative singular and plural?
by Kasper
Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Adding words
Replies: 3
Views: 1396

Not only is it permissible, but often a must.

Why are they not in the latin? well, latin is latin and does not obey english grammar rules. they are generally implied from the context in latin.
by Kasper
Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:58 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch #3 question
Replies: 8
Views: 7994

You are right, it is a verb. What you must look up is the first person active singular of the verb. Can you figure out what this would be?
by Kasper
Tue Aug 05, 2008 12:27 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Elegia Pro Solzhenitsyne (in memoriam)
Replies: 3
Views: 3607

Thanks for the comments Twpsyn. Well, it is poetry of course, or at least language set to meter, and the grammar tends to be a bit odd. Are you saying that even when compared to poetry the grammar is (too) odd? If so, why? In prose the lines would read: "dum virtus ursi et mens hominis confusae [sun...
by Kasper
Mon Aug 04, 2008 6:54 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Descartes - extensum
Replies: 4
Views: 1481

Thanks guys,

so if i understand this right, extensum refers to the physical properties of matter, while accepting that these are not constant? That is, 'flexible, mutabile' in the quoted passage modify 'extensum'?

i am utterly ignorant of physics... :oops:
by Kasper
Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:36 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Elegia Pro Solzhenitsyne (in memoriam)
Replies: 3
Views: 3607

Elegia Pro Solzhenitsyne (in memoriam)

Elegia Pro Solzhenitsyne (in memoriam)

dum virtus ursi confusae mens et hominis,
impetui veri quit retinere nihil.
by Kasper
Fri Aug 01, 2008 4:43 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Descartes - extensum
Replies: 4
Views: 1481

Descartes - extensum

Descartes is moving on from 'dubito ergo cogito ergo sum', and tries to find certainty in the physical world. He talks about a piece of wax he has on his table as he writes (which i assume is a candle). He notes how the wax seems hard, white, smells likes honey, etc., until it is brought to a flame,...
by Kasper
Thu Jul 24, 2008 5:56 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Amadeus Latine
Replies: 7
Views: 2395

I am unable to access youtube (i only have internet access at work), but would be keen to see your work Luce.

(On a side note, do take care with copyright when you make these adaptations.)
by Kasper
Mon Jul 21, 2008 5:51 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Catullus 51 Translation
Replies: 8
Views: 18446

Hi Twpsyn thanks for you comments!! re 'simul', it seems (to me) to indicate that Catullus is looking at her 'at the same time' as Mr Divine, but feels rather rotten because he cannot match Mr Divine's divinity. In fact, Catullus is so out of sorts that he can't speak a word to her. re 'misero', the...
by Kasper
Mon Jul 21, 2008 2:58 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Catullus 51 Translation
Replies: 8
Views: 18446

Ille mi par esse deo videntur, ille, si fas est, superare divos, This man seems to be an equal of the gods. This man, if it is right, appears to surpass the gods: You did not translate ‘mi’ ‘videntur’ does not appear right. Probably a typo for ‘videtur’ 'deo' is singular qui sedens adve...
by Kasper
Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:17 am
Forum: The Agora
Topic: De variis formulis colloquendi, lectio tertia
Replies: 3
Views: 4318

Care Franmorari, Gratias pro cura tua de mea! Bene mihi est, semper enim Dylanem Soloni antepono. :D Fortasse equidem erravi. Nonne attamen dixit Solo se non modo semper discere inveterascantem, sed etiam discentem inveterascere? id est, non video quomodo, si quidam pergat discere quamdiu inveterasc...
by Kasper
Tue Jul 15, 2008 11:13 pm
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: If you've got leaving on your mind (or, Patsy Cline greeked)
Replies: 9
Views: 7696

i'm not too sure about ending a line with a single syllable word either, Horace will be the poet to check for that, though I suppose Catullus uses his fair share of aeolic meters, too. Yeah well, 4 more months of law school and the world will reopen to me again, and allow me some time to actually r...
by Kasper
Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:31 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Pantoia.de
Replies: 10
Views: 4447

Sounds good. brownie points for those writing in a specific meter?
by Kasper
Tue Jul 15, 2008 2:18 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: If you've got leaving on your mind (or, Patsy Cline greeked)
Replies: 9
Views: 7696

Very nice Will, even despite the (poetic) liberty taken as to the dreams that might have been. I've drafted a latin version, also using the same meter. the third verse uses the meter of Mr Cho Dim for variety. There are a number of weaknesses, but the most glaring is scilicet the line 'noli huc reli...
by Kasper
Mon Jul 14, 2008 11:33 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Pantoia.de
Replies: 10
Views: 4447

annis wrote: Maybe we should have more translation challenges with pop songs or something over on the composition board.
Absolutely. but the difficulty with such challenges is that someone would have to review the poster's work, and this often does not happen, particularly with longer texts.
by Kasper
Mon Jul 14, 2008 3:04 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Recommendations for Learning Latin Idiom?
Replies: 23
Views: 7884

INteraxe,

your german is probably better than mine, but isn't mir an amalgamation of dative and ablative?
by Kasper
Mon Jul 14, 2008 3:02 am
Forum: The Agora
Topic: De variis formulis colloquendi, lectio tertia
Replies: 3
Views: 4318

Vale Franmorar, multas tibi gratias pro tuis lectionibus ago. Pergratae mihi sunt. miror adtamen de citatione (meliore verbo mihi absente) tua. Demonstram. Iamdudum cantor Bob Dylan mihi multum placet, et in carmine eius 'bene est matercula (modo cruentor)', cantit ille 'qui non nascitur, moritur.' ...
by Kasper
Mon Jul 14, 2008 12:04 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Help Translating a Phrase
Replies: 3
Views: 3728

I find ‘ideals’ a bit hard to translate. Idealis is more an adjective derived from ‘idea’, which is quite rare and late latin, and means something like ‘idea-like’. If you want to use it, the plural is Ideae. I’ve used consectatio instead, which means something that you vigorously strive after, or p...
by Kasper
Fri Jul 11, 2008 1:49 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Prose Translation Question, Ch. 13
Replies: 4
Views: 8901

the " et ... et ... " construction is a common phrase in latin, meaning something like 'both X and Y".

so in this case, read it as 'et corpus eius et nomen': the mount could have buried BOTH his body AND name.
by Kasper
Wed Jul 09, 2008 11:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: translation help
Replies: 1
Views: 932

nullae rimae in meo tegumine
by Kasper
Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:01 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: phoenix motto
Replies: 2
Views: 1391

one option would be:

"meo e cinere orior"



EDIT: on second thought i don't like the hiatus. "e meo cinere orior"
by Kasper
Tue Jul 08, 2008 6:51 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Quote for my classroom..help..
Replies: 3
Views: 4069

just to get some responses started, i'll propose:

"Nunquam te talem creatorum obliviscaris"

but wait for some better suggestions.
by Kasper
Fri Jun 27, 2008 1:41 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Adjuva me, domini dominaeque!!
Replies: 6
Views: 2571

I think he was referring to you, Will.
by Kasper
Wed Jun 18, 2008 11:03 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: some latin lines - please help!
Replies: 1
Views: 751

but ... if he's the best teacher, then you and your classmates should be reasonably good students, right? so why not make an attempt at it yourselves first, and then post that for comments?
by Kasper
Thu Jun 12, 2008 4:51 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: LIBRARY, LIBRARIAN (English words related to Greek words)
Replies: 18
Views: 9645

on a positive note, the comments following Neos' posts have often been very informative for people who, like me, are ignorant of the relationship between latin and greek, as well as other languages referred to. it even prompted me to look up PIE on Wikipedia, which i surely would not have done, or a...
by Kasper
Tue Jun 10, 2008 2:56 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: NEED TRANSLATION HELP
Replies: 1
Views: 783

A modest attempt:

Hauri sanguinem uti flumina magna ruant.
| - -| - u u |-| - u u| - u u| - |
by Kasper
Mon Jun 09, 2008 11:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help translating
Replies: 12
Views: 3789

i would say: quid me non frangit, fortiorem me facit. I would call this is a sound translation, Kasper, but use quod instead of quid: quod me non frangit fortiorem me facit My own rendition uses fewer words, which I think is probably desirable in a tattoo: nisi frangor fortior fio I've changed the ...
by Kasper
Thu Jun 05, 2008 11:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help translating
Replies: 12
Views: 3789

kev1888bhoy wrote: quidnam possum non effrego mihi volo solus mihi validus

the wisdom of asking strangers is now apparent to me. :D

i would say:
quid me non frangit,
fortiorem me facit.

but better wait for someone with better latin to advise you on this.
by Kasper
Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:42 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help translating
Replies: 12
Views: 3789

Well, that rule applies to homework questions does it not Luce? This does not seem homework related to me. of course the wisdom of asking a bunch of strangers to provide teh text for a tattoo in a language you don't understand is somewhat questionable... in any event, i believe there is a relatively...
by Kasper
Wed Apr 09, 2008 11:08 pm
Forum: The Agora
Topic: Picturae moventes optimae vobis?
Replies: 7
Views: 6775

Ego nuper "nulla terra senibus" vidi (quaeso attamen num melius sit illam "non est terra senibus" nuncupare, quia non videtur mihi dictum uti omnino nulla est terra senibus). Puto illam picturam bonam esse, non autem optimam. Honeste dubio num intellegam quae esset maior cogitatio sub illa pictura. ...
by Kasper
Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:25 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Megaanum, kiloannum, annum
Replies: 7
Views: 8952

Lucus, as a law student i feel you pain. Law remains packed full of latin maxims that are not understood by the professors that teach them. It is inexplicable why textbooks translate maxims like "in pari delictu potior est positio defendentis", as "at equal fault each party is liable for its own dam...
by Kasper
Tue Feb 26, 2008 11:01 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: IPSI vs SIBI
Replies: 29
Views: 10641

ipsum (and its other forms) as has now been variously stated, emphasises the noun it connects with. Translations may be 'the very ...', 'the actual ...', 'the selfsame ...'. So in your first sentence, "aravit agrum ipsum", the subject (the person plowing) is implied, and ipsum merely emphasises whic...
by Kasper
Mon Feb 25, 2008 3:43 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: IPSI vs SIBI
Replies: 29
Views: 10641

i think this will require the assistance of one of the superior latinists on this forum. In my view, which may be wrong, forms of 'ipse' (including ipsi) strengthen or emphasise the person or object that they refer to. In this it is different from sibi (or other reflexive forms for that matter). "il...
by Kasper
Mon Feb 25, 2008 2:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: IPSI vs SIBI
Replies: 29
Views: 10641

I don't see the difference between IPSE and SIBI unless SIBI is used with 'for' all the time and IPSE is not. That is exactly the point. 'sibi' is always, without exception, dative. that is, it is the indirect object. However it is also reflexive, and therefore translated as 'for/to himself/herself...
by Kasper
Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The complementary infinitive alone
Replies: 6
Views: 1972

I think the point is that there are more verbs you could use as an objective infinitive than just 'dare', e.g. "cogitare debemus".

and yes, of course the same would also work with dare.

"nonne auxilium miseris dare debemus?"
"dare debemus."
by Kasper
Fri Feb 22, 2008 5:07 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Double Negatives
Replies: 10
Views: 6553

i can avow for Dutch that is not not is is :D
by Kasper
Thu Feb 21, 2008 12:52 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Convoluted?
Replies: 10
Views: 2724

I'm wary of oversimplification, but i'm going to say: yes.

Of course a complicating factor is that (a vorm of) esse is often implied.

Let other textkittens correct me if i'm wrong. please. :wink:
by Kasper
Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Convoluted?
Replies: 10
Views: 2724

You are absolutely correct. Famous is predicate in your example. If you were to have the sentence:

"the unknown boy wants to be famous"

'unknown' is attributive; and 'famous' is predicate.
by Kasper
Wed Feb 20, 2008 3:30 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Convoluted?
Replies: 10
Views: 2724

here are two. A google-search should give you any further explanations you seek. You could also check out the pdf latin grammar books provided by textkit. http://homepage.usask.ca/~jrp638/latin/adj.html http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0001&query=head%3D%23187 ...
by Kasper
Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Convoluted?
Replies: 10
Views: 2724

hmm.. i'm not too sure what you are asking here. There is nothing wrong, in fact it is very common, for a subject (i.e. nominative) noun to be accompanied by an adjective. Adjectives can be attributive or predicate. It may be arguable that in some cases a predicate adjective may cause some confusion...