Search found 254 matches

by phil
Tue Feb 03, 2004 2:25 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell
Replies: 6
Views: 3265

Second Year Latin - Greenough, D'ooge and Daniell

I have just started reading Second Year Latin, and can't understand a couple of bits already! In the second story, Cock-fighting, there is the sentence: Bello Persico Themistocles cum exercitu iter in hostis faciebat, cum duos gallos vidit in via dimicantis. During the Persian war, Themistocles was ...
by phil
Thu Jan 29, 2004 10:51 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: gallus
Replies: 1
Views: 1180

gallus

Just by chance, I happened to come across gallus, meaning rooster, and Gallus, meaning a Gaul, within hours of each other, and I remembered that the French rugby team have a rooster for their mascot. Is this why?
by phil
Thu Jan 29, 2004 9:36 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 36 I don't cook for cooks!
Replies: 5
Views: 7727

So, it's a bit like the case where adjectives agree with the nearest thing they're modifying 'puer puellaque parva' means the small boy and girl. (Please correct me if I'm wrong) Does the same hold true for verbs I've just learned where the object takes the dative (or ablative) e.g. love and obey yo...
by phil
Thu Jan 29, 2004 7:50 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 36 I don't cook for cooks!
Replies: 5
Views: 7727

Ch 36 I don't cook for cooks!

This little couplet starts: Lector et auditor nostros probat, Aule, libellos, sed quidam exactos esse poeta negat. Does this translate as: The reader and the listener approve our pamphlets, Aulus but a certain poet says they're not finished ? If so, why is probat singular? I would have expected prob...
by phil
Wed Jan 28, 2004 9:42 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 36 PR 17
Replies: 1
Views: 3843

Ch 36 PR 17

I realise this comment is probably an exercise in pedantry, but as Latin is an exact language, I feel justified in raising it. :wink: Since his hope is becoming very small, let him confess that he commanded those two men not to do it. Cum fiat spes illius minima, fateatur se imeravisse istis duobus ...
by phil
Tue Jan 27, 2004 12:35 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: ch 36 fio - is it copulative?
Replies: 2
Views: 4806

ch 36 fio - is it copulative?

One of the exercises at the back is-
vos oramus ut discipuli acerrimi fiatis. We are begging you so that you might become very keen students.
I would have thought it should be discipulos acerrimos.
by phil
Tue Jan 13, 2004 2:22 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: self-test #2
Replies: 3
Views: 2730

Re: re: self-test #2

1. Arachne is making beautiful pictures. --Arachne picturas pulchras format. Yep 2. She is telling stories about the farmers. --Puella fabulas de agricolis narrat. or, --Ea fabulas de agricolis narrat. I would go for your second one, as 'girl' is not specifically mentioned. Could be a woman. 3. The...
by phil
Sun Jan 11, 2004 11:36 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Hello from Belgrade,Serbia
Replies: 12
Views: 2857

Hello aemilia paula!
Welcome here. Which language are you studying - Latin or Greek (or both)? I hope you find this site helpful.
Phil
by phil
Fri Jan 09, 2004 2:27 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: confirm translation (interrogative)
Replies: 15
Views: 6934

:D
by phil
Fri Jan 09, 2004 1:26 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: confirm translation (interrogative)
Replies: 15
Views: 6934

gratias tibi ago - sed quid me nominas 'Paulus'? ;)
by phil
Thu Jan 08, 2004 11:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: confirm translation (interrogative)
Replies: 15
Views: 6934

benissimus wrote:Quid can also mean "why" but without context it is impossible to tell.
'Quid' can mean why? How so?
by phil
Thu Jan 08, 2004 10:01 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Thanks
Replies: 10
Views: 2382

History for me, 'those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it' or words to that effect. I find that the more I learn about what mankind has been up to in the past, the easier it is to put what's happening now in perspective. (Or perhaps I'm just getting old and cynical) Thanks, too Dave for all ...
by phil
Thu Jan 08, 2004 9:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: confirm translation (interrogative)
Replies: 15
Views: 6934

You have got quid, meaning 'What?' correct.
The translation is therefore 'What are the nymphs shouting?'
(clamo, -are is to shout, and the tense is in the present)
by phil
Thu Jan 08, 2004 7:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: principle parts
Replies: 4
Views: 6187

These two are taken from the first few chapters of Harrius Potter:
implico,-are,-ui,-itum OR -avi,-atum; to involve/implicate
obsto, -are, -iti; to obstruct
apologists of HP unite! :)
by phil
Thu Jan 08, 2004 2:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: principle parts
Replies: 4
Views: 6187

Hi Robbie, As you've said, the first conjugation is the most regular. The most common pattern for 2nd conjugation goes: moneO, -Ere, -uI, -itum. The 3rd conjugation is something af a free-for-all, however there is a tutorial on this very site that will help you identify some of the more common patte...
by phil
Mon Dec 22, 2003 8:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: strange inflection
Replies: 16
Views: 7346

How did the Romans incorporate Greek words into Latin? I've glanced now and then at the Greek forum, and it looks like a convention of tapeworms. How did the Romans move those words across, and, if they had to translate them from the Greek alphabet to the Roman one, why did they keep the Greek decle...
by phil
Mon Dec 22, 2003 7:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: coepi vs incepi
Replies: 5
Views: 3062

coepi vs incepi

In Wheelock, we are told that coepi, -isse etc is used in the perfect system only, and incipio is used for present. Fair enough. When, though, is incepi correct, and when coepi? Or are they equivalent?
by phil
Mon Dec 22, 2003 7:01 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: dum pastores greges eorum nocte advigilabant :)
Replies: 1
Views: 1284

dum pastores greges eorum nocte advigilabant :)

It's the silly season..... why not... Music... tintinnabuli neniae latus tenebrosum lunae estne in Marte vita? feriae aestivae Books... scalae undequadraginta viri ex Marte, feminae ex Venere sunt homines tres in cymba fabula urbium duorum and of course: occasus et casus imperii Romani :) And of cou...
by phil
Mon Dec 22, 2003 6:33 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: nullam pacem or nihil pacis?
Replies: 5
Views: 6422

benissimus wrote:Different nuances there
So, both are correct?
by phil
Mon Dec 22, 2003 12:58 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: nullam pacem or nihil pacis?
Replies: 5
Views: 6422

nullam pacem or nihil pacis?

I was doing an English -> Latin exercise and the phrase '.. we were able to have no peace' popped up. The answer on the Wheelock forum says nullam pacem. But is nihil pacis also correct?
by phil
Sun Dec 21, 2003 8:17 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 32 'sic inviderit'
Replies: 2
Views: 4380

Ah, I did not properly understand the meaning of 'sic'. It makes sense now, thanks. :)
by phil
Sun Dec 21, 2003 7:17 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 31 1000 basiorum
Replies: 4
Views: 6301

Thanks, it does make sense now! It would appear that learning Latin involves more than just learning Latin!
by phil
Sun Dec 21, 2003 7:11 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Harry Potter in ancient Greek
Replies: 63
Views: 24869

Anyway, I have ordered Harrius Potter from amazon. I have read samples and it seems rather simple, so I hope it will help me grow a larger vocabulary. It will also help me with some common usage of the subjunctive and what not, which I think Wheelock could have covered better. That common speech is...
by phil
Sun Dec 21, 2003 6:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #1 Answers
Replies: 3
Views: 2532

In terms of the simplicity Classical prose would have favoured, I couldn't improve on the first two sentences of Phil's. Aw shucks... As regards his third, I am sceptical about quantum followed by the ablative. When quantum is used as an interrogative pronoun, it means "how much?" and can be follow...
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 11:19 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: two questions
Replies: 7
Views: 3089

Re: two questions

I have two grammatical questions, both sort of related. According to my grammar book after a verb of saying or thinking you get the infinitive. It gives the example: Dicit Romanos arma adversariis tradere. Very nice indeed. But how would you translate a sentence like "he says the romans are willing...
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 8:56 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: answer key??
Replies: 56
Views: 39437

Re: Ex 47, p.21

In Ex. 47 Part 1, #6, I think Filiae agricolae domina fabulam narrat should translate into "The lady tells the story to the daughters of the farmer". The key says "The lady tells the story to the farmer's daughter". If the lady were telling the story to the farmer's daughter s , then 'daughter' wou...
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 8:46 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 32 'sic inviderit'
Replies: 2
Views: 4380

Ch 32 'sic inviderit'

P&R 6, At volumus cognoscere cur sic inviderit et cur... But we wish to learn why he is sic jealous, and why... I'm not quite sure how to translate 'sic' in that sentence. I though it meant so/thus/in this way, as in 'don't do it that way, do it sic.' But if I just plug 'so' into that phrase, it see...
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 6:50 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 32 irregular adverbs
Replies: 4
Views: 5894

benissimus wrote:Perhaps it is marked because of the short final e?
Ah, yes I had missed that. Too subtle for me!
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 1:25 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: re: self-test
Replies: 3
Views: 1891

Re: re: self-test

caeruleus wrote:Forum:
5. The bull flees with Europa.
--Taurus cum Europa fugitat.
Caeruleus
I think 'fugitat' should be 'fugit' he/she/it flees from fugio, fugere... goes fugio, fugis, fugit.
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 12:50 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 32 irregular adverbs
Replies: 4
Views: 5894

Ta very much, - yes we've covered some of the irregular adjectives .. immo adjectives with irregular comparatives and superlatives, but that paragraph implied that male was of itself an irregular formation from adjective to adverb.
Hmmm ... illustrious... not the word I'd have used.
Phil
by phil
Thu Dec 18, 2003 12:01 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 32 irregular adverbs
Replies: 4
Views: 5894

Ch 32 irregular adverbs

In Wheelock, on page 220, it says "in the following table, adverbs that do not follow the standard rules for forming adverbs from adjectives are highlighted". But male is highlighted, implying that it is an irregular formation from malus. But it seem to follow the rules to me: add -e to the stem mal...
by phil
Wed Dec 17, 2003 1:19 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: #1 Subjunctive verbs in indirect questions
Replies: 4
Views: 3163

1. dic mihi cur timeas.
2. nescimus quid faciat.
3. nescio quantum navibus fuerint.
by phil
Mon Dec 15, 2003 3:00 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 31 1000 basiorum
Replies: 4
Views: 6301

Ch 31 1000 basiorum

The last three lines have got me baffleissimused. 11. conturbabimus illa, ne sciamus, 12. aut ne quis malus invidere possit 13. cum tantum sciat esse basiorum 11. We will jumble those things (what things?), so that we may not know, 12. nor so that someone may cast an evil eye, 13. when he may know s...
by phil
Mon Dec 15, 2003 2:47 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch 31 Ringo
Replies: 2
Views: 4844

Ch 31 Ringo

The book asks 'What effect might the poet be hoping to achieve by so widely separating noun (anulos) and adjective (senos)? To which my only reply can be 'Dunno'. Maybe to make the reader wait to find out what it is that you can have six of on each finger and not put away at night. What can you have...
by phil
Tue Nov 04, 2003 2:47 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Answers to Wheelock
Replies: 5
Views: 14125

Answers to Wheelock

Update: The answers can now be found in the Wheelock Answer Key [/b] OK, so I read each chapter of Wheelock and try to learn the grammar, vocab etc. presented. Then I do the self-tutorial exercises at the back, and then check my answers. Every chapter I find that I get at least some wrong, but that'...
by phil
Mon Oct 27, 2003 10:53 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Latin For Beginners, section 318 probably mental block.
Replies: 4
Views: 5416

OK, I'm not afraid to show that I still don't know Latin. Is 'eo' meaning 'there' in this sentence? The savages decided to join battle there, more because the Romans seemed to be weak. Maybe the comparison is that they chose the reason of the Romans appearing weak rather than any other reason for de...
by phil
Thu Oct 23, 2003 1:17 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: In the next 40 minutes
Replies: 75
Views: 20268

Classics programs on BBC are a case in point. You have nationalized the TV industry, which can quite easily be made to function in the private sector. And classics programs paid by taxes are, let's face it, essentially welfare for the rich. I am jealousissimus (guess which chapter in Wheelock I'm u...
by phil
Wed Oct 22, 2003 7:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Laocoonta
Replies: 7
Views: 4508

Greek nouns? Klewlis, we haven't encountered them yet have we? Is that another chapter I slept through?
by phil
Wed Oct 22, 2003 12:58 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Laocoonta
Replies: 7
Views: 4508

Laocoonta

Wheelock introduces 'Laocoon, -ontis (m)' as the character in a story. However in the text, the form 'Laocoonta' appears. The -is genitive ending means that it is 3rd declension no? With endings in -em, -is, -i, -e, -es, -um and -ibus. So how can a masculine 3rd decl noun end in '-a'?
by phil
Mon Oct 20, 2003 10:36 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: iucundi atque felicis
Replies: 6
Views: 8232

Thanks people. Yes, 'contains something of joy and happiness' would be correct. Looking back I see that partitive genitives were covered a few chapters back. I never really understood them then, (and I still don't see how you can have part of an adjective) but at least now I'll know what to look for!