Search found 582 matches

by Interaxus
Wed Nov 10, 2004 3:07 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Plus Bello Gallico
Replies: 9
Views: 3567

Ferrarie, et alii: 1) Qua in re militum virtus admodem fuit laudanda; qui vectoriis gravibusque navigiis remigandi laborem non intermiserunt. ”Qua in re” refers to something in the immediately preceding sentence in the Duffield book. Which is: Tum rursus (Then again) aestus commutionem secutus (havi...
by Interaxus
Tue Nov 09, 2004 11:54 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Why the present tense here?
Replies: 11
Views: 8566

Thanks for putting me back on the straight and neutral, Episcope. That's what comes of trying to play with the big boys. :oops: D--- those neuters! Will I ever get them right? If I could find the text to Elvis's "Cor ligneum" I might go around humming that until I got 'cor' right at least ... (ie if...
by Interaxus
Mon Nov 08, 2004 8:50 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Why the present tense here?
Replies: 11
Views: 8566

Oh I agree. You're certainly one of the most historically present vivid-language exponents on the site - cordem tuum in manica geris . :) Here's a reflection on history from the Big Gold Book: Historia est gesta res, ab aetatis nostrae memoria remota. ('History is actual occurrences remote from the ...
by Interaxus
Mon Nov 08, 2004 5:59 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Why the present tense here?
Replies: 11
Views: 8566

No, Episcope, I only meant the word GERIT was historic present! In the context, the last sentence only signals the end of a descriptive passage and the resumption of the main narrative. So my first sentence Exercitus qui in hostium finibus bellum gerit multis periculis circumdatus est. becomes “The ...
by Interaxus
Mon Nov 08, 2004 3:43 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Why the present tense here?
Replies: 11
Views: 8566

Thanks for your insights and comments. The riddle has been solved and you are both right of course. :D The text was not Caesar but Mr d’Ooge’s venture into story-telling half a century before Ecce Romani, Oxford/Cambridge courses, etc – a Roman youth (Publius) grows up and joins Caesar on his campai...
by Interaxus
Sun Nov 07, 2004 10:57 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Why the present tense here?
Replies: 11
Views: 8566

Why the present tense here?

In the Reading Matter after the exercises in d’Ooge’s L for B, at the start of ’How the Romans marched and camped’, page 214, I am confused by the following: Exercitus qui in hostium finibus bellum gerit multis periculis circumdatus est . Quae pericula ut vitarent , Romani summam curam adhibere sole...
by Interaxus
Fri Nov 05, 2004 8:09 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Basics of Latin
Replies: 10
Views: 7645

Episcopus: Check Livy II. 23-34 for auforent. Imagination? I think not. Sorry, I couldn't find it in the Perseus text using their search engine. Can you quote the sentence? please do not include forms such as aforetis which are not even in A&G. Yes, I saw foremus, foretis were missing in Gilderslee...
by Interaxus
Fri Nov 05, 2004 9:36 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Basics of Latin
Replies: 10
Views: 7645

Episcopus wrote: What's that? You want to know the imperfect subjunctive of esse? Well ok if you insist. Well let's start with abesse, to be away, aufforem auffores aufforet aufforemus aufforetis aufforent, they might be away These are the most common forms of esse and must be learned immediately Ac...
by Interaxus
Wed Nov 03, 2004 11:44 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Irregular Verbs
Replies: 12
Views: 3399

Hej på dej, Episcop-e! :D I understand your words but not quite your drift. You seem to say “It’s OK to use books until you’ve mastered the language but Swedish is easier than Latin”. Well, I agree with both statements but where’s the logical connection? I too am impressed by your Swedish. You’re ob...
by Interaxus
Wed Nov 03, 2004 2:03 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Irregular Verbs
Replies: 12
Views: 3399

Salvete sodales, I have this book and it has been an incredible help to me. I like those verb books too. Try The Big Gold Book of Latin Verbs (555 fully conjugated). It’s even better than 501 Verbs because it provides loads of examples taken from classical authors illustrating various shades of mean...
by Interaxus
Mon Oct 25, 2004 3:45 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin
Replies: 23
Views: 17058

Salve ptran, Thanks for the example of bad Latin. I get the point. A couple more would be fun. If we disagree over the goals for learning Latin, then obviously we'll disagree over what text is best for what. We don’t disagree over the goal of being able to read real Latin, though our choice of prefe...
by Interaxus
Sun Oct 24, 2004 6:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin
Replies: 23
Views: 17058

ptran, Whenever I taught out of M & F, I was always so annoyed by the fake- really, really fake- Latin that was the exercise sentences What do you mean by ’fake Latin’? The absence of participle constructions, accusative-and-infitives and gerunds or ...? Please give some examples of BAD LATIN from M...
by Interaxus
Thu Oct 14, 2004 12:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The cinematographic Latin sentence
Replies: 6
Views: 1727

The cinematographic Latin sentence

Zeugma? Oh, you mean like ‘He took my advice and my wallet’? Yes, I see what you mean. As regards the Romans letting the Volscians go, I guess they were considered small fry unworthy of being taken back to Rome for a parade. It was enough to humiliate the survivors and kick them out of camp shiverin...
by Interaxus
Wed Oct 13, 2004 11:12 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Has Catullus lost it?
Replies: 13
Views: 3426

Phaselus ... ait fuisse navium celerrimus

A note in an anthology I have confirms everything you have said and then some. It finds ’celerrimus’ interesting for another reason too. I quote: ’ ait fuisse navium celerrimus’ : in prose we should have ’ait se fuisse celerrimum’. Catullus, who is writing in Greek metre and style, uses the nominati...
by Interaxus
Fri Oct 08, 2004 10:13 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Latin Study Group using Wheelock
Replies: 12
Views: 8034

Excuse me for intruding on hallowed Wheelock territory :oops: but if you’re not going to form any other group, what about a small Horace study group? The syllabus would consist quite simply of 5 well-known odes (numbers 1.4, 1.5, 1.9, 1.11 (the carpe diem one) and 4.7. Objective: to get to know them...
by Interaxus
Wed Oct 06, 2004 3:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: We'll see each other on thursday?
Replies: 8
Views: 2438

See you on Thursday!

Here are some picture-strip balloon texts from Latin for Beginners, Usborne Language Guides. The unit is called ‘Arranging things’: Tennis A: ludemusne teniludio? B: quando? Die Martis? C: optime. usque ad diem Martis. Swimming A: natabimusne die Mercurii? B: bene! Post meridiem? A: optime! Tertia h...
by Interaxus
Wed Oct 06, 2004 4:32 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The cinematographic Latin sentence
Replies: 6
Views: 1727

The cinematographic Latin sentence

Heres my latest (still close-to-the-text) version: (Do I see a pattern in the Latin? Subject CUM clause / PAST PARTICIPLE clause CUM clause / PAST PARTICIPLE clause Main Verb) Volsc exiguam spem in arms / ali undique abscis / CUM TEMPTSSENT, praeter ctera adversa / loc quoque iniqu ad pgnam CONGRESS...
by Interaxus
Tue Oct 05, 2004 6:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The cinematographic Latin sentence
Replies: 6
Views: 1727

Thanks Benissimus, that was brill! I cannot say how impressed I am by your skills - and your generosity with your time. You've really given me something to think about. I need a little time to digest everything so I'll get back to you later with comments. :D

Cheers,
Int
by Interaxus
Tue Oct 05, 2004 2:04 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The cinematographic Latin sentence
Replies: 6
Views: 1727

The cinematographic Latin sentence

Can anyone can help me? In Paragraph 601 of the Allen & Greenough New Latin Grammar, the authors use a passage from Livys Ab urbe condita to demonstrate long-sentence verb-at-the-end structure. Its about what happened to the Volscians when they tangled with the Romans. Someone wrote that Latin sente...
by Interaxus
Sun Oct 03, 2004 7:16 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Bello Gallico
Replies: 24
Views: 6384

Caesar

A correction: I misread the map. Caesar set out from the Boulogne area on his first trip to England. His major effort the following year (54BC) started out from the Calais area. I know this doesn't affect the problem under discussion but sorry anyway.

Int :oops:
by Interaxus
Sun Oct 03, 2004 4:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Bello Gallico
Replies: 24
Views: 6384

I checked up in various sources and came up with the following notes for what they are worth. Legati ex magna parte Morinorum ad eum veniunt: (Lieut.'s from a large part of the Morini come to him:) C. is about to cross the English channel from what is today Calais. He’s in potentially hostile territ...
by Interaxus
Sat Oct 02, 2004 2:47 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Bello Gallico
Replies: 24
Views: 6384

Caesar's prepositions

Hi, I'm new here. My level is sort of crazy intermediate. Thanks for a stimulating problem. It took me a moment or two to realize/remember that 'superioris temporis' were both GENITIVE SINGULAR (and not ablative plural!), but after that everything fell into place. In this case, Latin seems to functi...