Search found 36 matches

by tbearzhang
Mon Nov 07, 2016 7:12 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #14
Replies: 2
Views: 3070

Re: Loci Immutati #14

comitibus non consecutis is ablative absolute and not the agent of the action datus est . If that were the case, it would not have been ablative absolute but ablative with a/ab . With this in mind, it should make sense to you. Thank you! Yeah, I actually thought about the ablative absolute as I was...
by tbearzhang
Mon Nov 07, 2016 4:24 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #14
Replies: 2
Views: 3070

Loci Immutati #14

Original Sentence: Nec esuriens Ptolemaeus ederat, cui cum peragranti Aegyptum, comitibus non consecutis cibarius in casa panis datus esset, nihil visum est illo pane iucundius. My translation: And Ptolemaeus had not eaten being hungry, to whom when wandering through Egypt, ordinary (coarse) bread h...
by tbearzhang
Fri Nov 04, 2016 5:42 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #13
Replies: 8
Views: 5358

Re: Loci Immutati #13

Yes the punctuation could be a bit confusing: a comma would be better than a colon before Diogenes’ reply. But it’s normal for Latin to put inquit after the first few words of direct speech rather than preceding it. (It’s the same with Greek ἔφη.) So it’s all one sentence, and inquit is the one and...
by tbearzhang
Thu Nov 03, 2016 7:57 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #13
Replies: 8
Views: 5358

Re: Loci Immutati #13

Hmm... I haven't thought about it that way. Then do. I tend to think that "diceret" is the main verb of the first sentence. Then why is it imperfect subjunctive, and why is there an ut in front of it? How do you tend to explain that? I was a bit confused by the punctuation, since in English the mai...
by tbearzhang
Wed Nov 02, 2016 6:12 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #13
Replies: 8
Views: 5358

Re: Loci Immutati #13

Alex was asking him to say if he needed anything—roganti ut diceret (lit. "asking that he say"). There’s no “said” in the sentence so far. We haven’t yet reached the main verb, which I presume is something like respondit—hence the dative Alexandro. Diogenes’ reply explains liberius (comparative) ut...
by tbearzhang
Wed Nov 02, 2016 6:10 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #13
Replies: 8
Views: 5358

Re: Loci Immutati #13

1. Correct! Dative. But it is possible that you may have missed the nuance. 2. The second ut is there because the verb "rogare" asks for a ut. Rogo ut mihi panem des. Etc. This remains the case even if rogare is a participle, even a participle in the dative, as is the case here. At vero Diogenes li...
by tbearzhang
Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:37 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #13
Replies: 8
Views: 5358

Loci Immutati #13

Original Sentence: At vero Diogenes liberius, ut Cynicus, Alexandro roganti ut diceret si quid opus esset ... My translation: But, however, Diogenes, as a Cynic, boldly said to Alexander asking if he needed anything ... Question: 1. What is the case of "Alexandro roganti"? I think it's in the DATIVE...
by tbearzhang
Mon Oct 31, 2016 8:16 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #11
Replies: 2
Views: 2774

Re: Loci Immutati #11

Thank you anphph! Your explanation was very clear and helpful. If you feel like you are translating to make sure you get the text, then stick to more verbal constructions. Then, later, and if you want, touch them up, but don't feel like you have to do both. Thank you for the translation advice, too....
by tbearzhang
Mon Oct 31, 2016 2:39 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Immutati #11
Replies: 2
Views: 2774

Loci Immutati #11

The first sentence: L. Paulus consul iternum, cum ei bellum ut cum rege Perse gereret obtigisset, ut ea ipsa die domum ad vesperum rediit, filiolam suam Tertiam, quae tum erat admodum parva, osculans animadvertit tristiculam. My translation: Lucius Paulus consul a second time, when to wage war with ...
by tbearzhang
Wed Oct 05, 2016 8:34 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: New member!
Replies: 2
Views: 1827

Re: New member!

Your novel sounds quite interesting, what is its title and where can it be found?
by tbearzhang
Wed Oct 05, 2016 8:22 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #8
Replies: 7
Views: 4471

Re: Locī Immūtātī #8

I see. Many thanks!
by tbearzhang
Wed Oct 05, 2016 4:09 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #8
Replies: 7
Views: 4471

Re: Locī Immūtātī #8

But I am not clear on the grammatical structure of the sentence. As I understand it, "mens cuiusque" and "is" are both subjects of the verb "est"? But why are we using the masculine form "is" instead of "ea", since "mens" is feminine?
by tbearzhang
Tue Oct 04, 2016 8:19 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #8
Replies: 7
Views: 4471

Re: Locī Immūtātī #8

So I looked up the original text on the Latin Library: Et ille: 'Tu vero ... sic habeto, non esse te mortalem, sed corpus hoc; nec enim tu is es, quem forma ista declarat, sed mens cuiusque is est quisque, non ea figura, quae digito demonstrari potest. ...' Compared to the textbook, " tuis " becomes...
by tbearzhang
Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:46 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #8
Replies: 7
Views: 4471

Re: Locī Immūtātī #8

There are a couple of errors I can see in your reading and/or transcription of the passage: " tuis " and " cuisque ". Clearly cuisque should be cuique but have you realised yet what tuis should be? Understanding the latter correctly may help you to make much better sense of the passage. Yeah, I was...
by tbearzhang
Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:18 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Chapter 5 Martial help
Replies: 2
Views: 3448

Re: Chapter 5 Martial help

Looks right to me, for what that's worth...
by tbearzhang
Tue Oct 04, 2016 6:13 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #8
Replies: 7
Views: 4471

Locī Immūtātī #8

Hi, I haven't posted here in a while. Been pretty busy in the past few months. I try to spend a few nights per week to work on the Locī Immūtātī, but progress has been slow (just plowed through two excerpts from Cicero's In Catilīnam Ōrātiō , and boy does he have a lot to write about our friend Cati...
by tbearzhang
Fri Jul 22, 2016 9:12 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #1
Replies: 4
Views: 4032

Re: Locī Immūtātī #1

es ūnus Ītalōrum is taken together. So maybe "you are (the one) alone (the first) amongst the Italians". Unus may have to be translated as an english adverb. I dont quite follow what you say about sum plus adjectives but I dont think what you say is right. For example, in line 5, is "ausus es" take...
by tbearzhang
Fri Jul 22, 2016 6:23 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Locī Immūtātī #1
Replies: 4
Views: 4032

Locī Immūtātī #1

Lines 3-7, a very long sentence... Original text: 3. Cornēlī, tibi, namque tū solēbās 4. meās esse aliquid putāre nūgās, 5. iam tum cum ausus es ūnus Ītalōrum 6. omne aevum tribus explicāre chartīs, 7. doctīs--Iuppiter!--et labōriōsīs. Questions: 1. How is "ūnus" in line 5 translated? (I think it is...
by tbearzhang
Sun Jul 10, 2016 8:05 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #10
Replies: 6
Views: 4761

Re: Loci Antiqui #10

Gratias tibi ago
by tbearzhang
Sun Jul 10, 2016 6:40 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #10
Replies: 6
Views: 4761

Re: Loci Antiqui #10

So the English translation would be: A country mouse, having been persuaded by a city mouse, left (his) countryside home for (the) city so that, (a) harsh life having been left behind, (the) happy (mouse) lived among happy things with that (city mouse). Correct? beatus is being used predicatively, ...
by tbearzhang
Sat Jul 09, 2016 9:17 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #10
Replies: 6
Views: 4761

Re: Loci Antiqui #10

Beatus is an adjective describing the subject of in rēbus iūcundīs cum illō vīveret, which is mus rusticus, of course. It wouldn't be wrong to use an adverb as you suggest, but it's perfectly fine as is. So the English translation would be: A country mouse, having been persuaded by a city mouse, le...
by tbearzhang
Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:37 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #10
Replies: 6
Views: 4761

Loci Antiqui #10

Original Sentence:

Mūs rūsticus, impulsus ab urbānō mūre, domō rūsticā ad urbem abiit ut, dūrā vītā relictā, in rēbus iūcundīs cum illō vīveret beātus.

Question:

What is "beātus" describing? Shouldn't it be "beātē", "happily", or "beātius", "more happily"?

Thanks!
by tbearzhang
Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:28 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #9
Replies: 3
Views: 3020

Re: Loci Antiqui #9

Thanks everyone for the explanation.
by tbearzhang
Fri Jul 08, 2016 2:45 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Loci Antiqui #9
Replies: 3
Views: 3020

Loci Antiqui #9

I'm working on the Loci Antiqui, #9 (Autobiographical notes by Horace) The last sentence of the first paragraph: Hoc magnum esse duco, quod placui tibi, qui bonos a turpibus secernis non patre claro sed vita et pectore puro. My translation: I consider this (thing) to be great, the fact that I please...
by tbearzhang
Wed Jul 06, 2016 5:43 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Self introduction
Replies: 15
Views: 8385

Re: Self introduction

thanks for posting this tbearzhang. just fascinating. i will admit that as an american i find china to be largely a mystery to me. russia is sort of the same. there's just so much i don't understand. you are a fine writer. Thank you for your kind words. On the surface China and America are very dif...
by tbearzhang
Tue Jul 05, 2016 7:15 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Self introduction
Replies: 15
Views: 8385

Re: Self introduction

bThey are both very short, and contain a very high density of information (relative to the amount of space they occupy). I think Chinese poetry has the edge on brevity - and obscurity. Don't take that as an insult; I'm sure many poems become clear(er) once you've sifted them, and the rewards make t...
by tbearzhang
Tue Jul 05, 2016 5:30 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Self introduction
Replies: 15
Views: 8385

Re: Self introduction

brainout: I've recently finished all 40 chapters of Wheelock's Latin and am working on Loci Antiqui. Having some basic knowledge of Latin grammar definitely helps - I'd be completely lost if I didn't know about the various grammatical constructs of the ablatives and the gerunds. But I appreciate you...
by tbearzhang
Thu Jun 02, 2016 3:27 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 37 Question
Replies: 4
Views: 3943

Re: Ch. 37 Question

Thanks seneca2008 & anphph!
by tbearzhang
Thu Jun 02, 2016 7:10 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 37 Question
Replies: 4
Views: 3943

Ch. 37 Question

6th Ed. Revised, Chapter 37, Practice and Review #6: At nos, ispi multa mala passi, conati sumus eis iratis persuadere ut servos vinculis liberarent et ne cui nocerent. My translation: But we, ourselves having suffered/endured many evil (things), have tried to persuade the angry (people) to free (th...
by tbearzhang
Tue May 31, 2016 5:38 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Self introduction
Replies: 15
Views: 8385

Re: Self introduction

I'm bilingual - I can speak English without an accent (with an American Midwest accent, to be exact) and I speak Mandarin Chinese like a native (I'm told I have a "southerner accent" in Chinese). I'm fully proficient (reading, speaking, writing, listening) in both languages. Hylander, your post was ...
by tbearzhang
Tue May 31, 2016 5:32 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 36 HELP
Replies: 9
Views: 6458

Re: Ch. 36 HELP

Thank you! This is exactly the type of information I was hoping to get.

As a novice I do realize that I am relying too much on English to understand Latin. I will need to work on that. But at least English is better than Chinese in aiding my study of Latin :D :P
by tbearzhang
Sun May 29, 2016 10:24 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 36 HELP
Replies: 9
Views: 6458

Re: Ch. 36 HELP

The textbook doesn't really provide a whole lot of information about the verb fio, fieri, factus sum. It provides one example: "Periculum fit gravius." Which translates as "The danger is becoming greater." So I guess the hint is that "fieri" has a similar function as "esse" and can serve as a "linke...
by tbearzhang
Sun May 29, 2016 5:46 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 36 HELP
Replies: 9
Views: 6458

Re: Ch. 36 HELP

I'm still confused... Omnia fient quae fieri aequum est. My understanding is that the main clause of this sentence is "Omnia fient". So I think "quae" functions as a relative pronoun, representing "omnia" in the subordinate clause. But I'm not clear on the "quae fieri aequum est" part of the sentenc...
by tbearzhang
Sun May 29, 2016 7:38 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 36 HELP
Replies: 9
Views: 6458

Re: Ch. 36 HELP

So what is the function of the infinitive here?

Is the infinitive an indirect statement or an object of the verb fient?
by tbearzhang
Sat May 28, 2016 9:54 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 36 HELP
Replies: 9
Views: 6458

Ch. 36 HELP

I'm working on the Sententiae Antiquae for Chapter 36 (6th Ed. Revised) and am having trouble with this sentence: Omnia fient quae fieri aequum est. Could someone explain the grammatical structure to me? I have a rough idea of what it is trying to convey but am not sure how the grammar works. What i...
by tbearzhang
Sat May 28, 2016 8:04 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Self introduction
Replies: 15
Views: 8385

Self introduction

Hello, I'm a classical language enthusiast and am currently in the process of self learning Latin. I went to school in China and majored in Biology in college. It is uncommon for schools in China to offer Latin courses, but by a strange stroke of luck my school hired an instructor from the Netherlan...