Search found 18 matches

by Tom L.
Wed Mar 03, 2004 2:29 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with very late Latin
Replies: 0
Views: 961

Help with very late Latin

All, This is an inscription found on the monument of a renown 17th Century fencing Master by the name of Salvator Fabris, professor at the court of the King of Denmark. The passage, although intelligible logically and verbally, gives me trouble from a grammatical standpoint. Any and all help in this...
by Tom L.
Fri Feb 27, 2004 2:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Episcopus wrote:semper conor bene eloqui
Hoc plane videtur, Episcope. Semper eleganter scribes, et multa cum Virgiliana venustate.
by Tom L.
Thu Feb 26, 2004 10:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Numquam plurimis uvae generibus vimum bibo, solum uno cui nomen est Barbera :wink:

Nonne dixisti puellam in effigiem "Rachel Blanchard" appellatam esse?
by Tom L.
Thu Feb 26, 2004 8:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Episcope, Episcope, Quamquam absurdum hoc esset, verum nomen puellae ego, non tu, novi. Haec scaenica Alicia profecto est Silverstonia - si vis, ipse hoc expiscari potes hic: http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/1781/alicia.html . Deinde, "effigiarum porticula" elige, ac ipsa effigies quam tu habes in tert...
by Tom L.
Thu Feb 26, 2004 8:21 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How/why do people pronuance Caesar
Replies: 10
Views: 5825

Re: How/why do people pronuance Caesar

The Italians will look at the same name and say something like "CHAY-zar", No, I don't think so. In Italian, - at least in the modern Roman dialect, c is pronounced "s" when it is before "i" and "e". Otherwise it's a hard c. Caesar would be something like "ka-ey'-zar", accent on the pentultimate. -...
by Tom L.
Thu Feb 26, 2004 4:19 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How/why do people pronuance Caesar
Replies: 10
Views: 5825

It depends on whether you pronounce the classical way or the medieval/ecclesiastical way. According to the former, you would pronounce the C as a K, and you would sound every letter as written. (Ka - es - ar) The ecclesiastical way, instead, calls for the C as an English "ch" (as in cheese) and the ...
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 25, 2004 9:50 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ablative use confusion
Replies: 6
Views: 2857

I agree with Benissimus (and in turn with Yvonne).

The subject of the ut clause is Jupiter - thus "se" in this case would mean that the two heros are petitioning the deity to inflict punishment on himself.

Tom
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 25, 2004 9:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2767

Ulpianus, your explanation is very clear. I owe you.
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 25, 2004 9:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2767

Ulpianus, So, what you are saying is that unless suus was connected to the subject, using eius is more grammatically correct? Thus, would these sentences all be correct? Puellam ad litus adhibui ut mihi suam pulchram faciem ostenderet. (Puella subj. of the ut clause). Puella mecum ad litus venit ut ...
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 25, 2004 8:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2767

Hmm...

Can faciem mirari mean to admire [someone's] form - although, as Benissimus points out, facies can also mean face? Does the dep. verb mirari take the accusative?
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 25, 2004 2:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Use of possessive
Replies: 6
Views: 2767

Use of possessive

Is there a definite rule about the use of "suus" Vs. "eius/eorum"? I must admit that these possessives confuse me somewhat. Let me give you an example.

Is it better to say:

Puellam ad litus adhibui ut suam pulchram faciem mirarer.

Or

Puellam ad litus adhibui ut eius pulchram faciem mirarer?
by Tom L.
Tue Feb 24, 2004 6:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

:( Ut plane videre potes, mea acroamatum cognitio minimast.
by Tom L.
Tue Feb 24, 2004 5:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Aha! Post brevem cogitationem puellam tuam Aliciam Silverstoniam esse agnovi. :wink:
by Tom L.
Tue Feb 24, 2004 2:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ablative use confusion
Replies: 6
Views: 2857

Yvonne, Adficio used with the accusative (eos) and the ablative (pari calamitate) means treating or punishing someone (acc) with something (abl.). Thus the way I would translate your sentence is: Since they could not live in such solitude, they begged Jove that he would either give them people or af...
by Tom L.
Mon Feb 23, 2004 10:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Benissime, Episcope, perbono auxilio multas vobis gratias ago. Eheu, sentio eruditionem, maxume quando non exercitam, bonum caducum et facile exolescente esse. Sed mea secunda fortuna hoc inveni forum, igitur dehinc saepius id frequentabo, et cum spe magna paulo in tempore mea aerugo dissipabitur. B...
by Tom L.
Mon Feb 23, 2004 5:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help With Phrase Please
Replies: 4
Views: 1876

John, I defer to those here like Benissimus or Episcopus who know a lot more than I do ~ but there are a couple expressions that come to mind: Iter facere or ambulare (especially the second if you are looking for a single word) can be decent ways to translate "to travel". If you add the adverbs "ben...
by Tom L.
Thu Feb 19, 2004 10:21 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rusty Latin - Please help me review this
Replies: 18
Views: 6369

Rusty Latin - Please help me review this

Hello! I have been away from the beauteous Language for over ten years (shame on me), and I am only now returning to it. Please help me check this passage that will be posted on another forum as the sticky for the Latin section of a fencing forum. Thank you all in advance for the kindness and help. ...
by Tom L.
Wed Feb 18, 2004 3:42 pm
Forum: The Agora
Topic: Animalia
Replies: 28
Views: 24216

Quintus Sertorius wrote:ita cogito, quid in lingua Latina est "standard poodle"?
Bonum puto esse nomen "canis barbatus medius"; nam in Italica lingua hic canis vocatur "barbone". Ceteri duo canes barbati possunt vocari "canis barbatus maior" et "minor", utrum vis "barbatellus".