Search found 23 matches

by galen697
Wed May 27, 2009 5:13 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Strange helping verbs in Latin
Replies: 3
Views: 1244

Re: Strange helping verbs in Latin

I like the last one- nice and concise, and on a level that my 10th graders can grasp. They've been reading fragments of Vergil to get them ready for AP Latin next year, and for their last project of the year they're choosing one of the many unresolved scenes from the Aeneid and composing a 15-25 lin...
by galen697
Wed May 27, 2009 3:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Strange helping verbs in Latin
Replies: 3
Views: 1244

Strange helping verbs in Latin

How would one say "intended", as in "The house looked like it was intended to be left alone"? Gratias

"Domus videtur quasi... reliqui"
by galen697
Tue May 19, 2009 3:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Modern sports terms in Latin?
Replies: 2
Views: 1903

Modern sports terms in Latin?

Is there any reference for modern sports terms in Latin? I have a student who's attempting to translate a baseball game recap article into Latin and we're a bit stumped on words for things like "innings", "home run", etc
by galen697
Mon May 11, 2009 4:51 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ScorpioMartianus.com is back!
Replies: 4
Views: 1155

Re: ScorpioMartianus.com is back!

Looks great!

How often do you plan on updating?
by galen697
Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:26 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Longest Latin word?
Replies: 3
Views: 4393

Re: Longest Latin word?

I forgot my favourite in English, which is an 18th-century, Latin-based joke word, and properly latin! It means the habit of estimating things as worthless. It certainly is still in use in English because I use it every chance I get. I'll now start in Latin! Desiderium meum anglicè, jocosum saeculi...
by galen697
Mon Apr 20, 2009 2:27 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Longest Latin word?
Replies: 3
Views: 4393

Longest Latin word?

What is the longest word in Latin (using the 1st principal part)? Off the top of my head, I'm thinking "obstupefacio", but I'm sure there are others that surpass this.
by galen697
Mon Apr 20, 2009 2:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: olim erat puella ex nantucket!
Replies: 8
Views: 2445

Re: olim erat puella ex nantucket!

Here's proof/ Ecce indicium B. Transf. 1. To indicate the country, and, in gen., the place from or out of which any person or thing comes, from: ex Aethiopia est usque haec, Ter. Eun. 3, 2, 18 : quod erat ex eodem municipio, Cic. Clu. 17, 49 ; cf. id. ib. 5, 11.--Freq. without a verb: Philocrates e...
by galen697
Mon Apr 13, 2009 2:33 pm
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Possim Rusticum Si... (You Might Be a Redneck If...)
Replies: 4
Views: 4677

Possim Rusticum Si... (You Might Be a Redneck If...)

I was thinking about how to teach/reteach potential subjunctive over the weekend, and suddenly remembered back when I was a big Jeff Foxworthy fan. So I thought I'd start up a Roman-themed "Redneck Joke" thread. This should yield up some good things- after all, Romans had the same sort of attitude t...
by galen697
Wed Apr 08, 2009 2:44 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Musically Instrumented Textkittens
Replies: 11
Views: 3797

Re: Musically Instrumented Textkittens

I play trombone and have played baritone and tuba in the past. I also dabbled in a steel drum band for a couple semesters in college- fun stuff.
by galen697
Tue Apr 07, 2009 2:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: olim erat puella ex nantucket!
Replies: 8
Views: 2445

Re: olim erat puella ex nantucket!

Just a quick note- it should be "a Nantucket" rather than "ex"; ex connotates moving in a direction out or away from, while a/ab connotates origin/source, which is what this phrase is.
by galen697
Tue Apr 07, 2009 2:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Verbal noun phrases- gerund or participle?
Replies: 2
Views: 1425

Verbal noun phrases- gerund or participle?

I've been wondering about how to say in Latin a phrase like "Running of the Bulls", Changing of the Guard" or "Singing of the National Anthem". While a gerund would typically cover the act of doing the verb, I'm at a bit of a hitch because a nominative gerund doesn't exist. So how would I express a ...
by galen697
Thu Mar 26, 2009 2:29 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?
Replies: 8
Views: 5814

Re: CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?

I assume then you'd be attending for Greek? Because I don't think you'd learn anything new in Latin. It would be quite a rigorous review if one had any gaps in his or her knowledge. Some people have been known to do it, even after having been Classics majors in undergrad programs. That's basically ...
by galen697
Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:00 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?
Replies: 8
Views: 5814

Re: CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?

Thanks for the information. I've studied Latin since 6th grade, majored in Classics in college and read plenty of Vergil, Lucan, Plautus, Terence and a few other authors and have taught junior high through AP in Dayton OH for the last two years.
by galen697
Tue Mar 24, 2009 2:37 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?
Replies: 8
Views: 5814

CUNY Latin/Greek Institute info?

I'm considering whether to enroll in CUNY's Latin/Greek summer institute program this year as a jump-start on my masters' work in the next year or two. It's an all-summer long intensive session held in NYC. Has anybody heard of this or participated that could give me advice or share their memories?
by galen697
Fri Mar 20, 2009 3:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: catullus
Replies: 5
Views: 1241

Re: catullus

For Rumoresque senum severiorum try: "All the gossip of rather austere old men" (senum -> senex, here used as a noun) I've generally translated "severiorum" as "more stern" old men, which I think better reflects the group of people he's describing that disapprove of Catullus' Bohemian, neoteric lif...
by galen697
Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Some really simple vocabulary questions
Replies: 6
Views: 1832

Re: Some really simple vocabulary questions

From what I've seen, quia is a common way to introduce subjunctive causal clauses, especially in early Latin. I recall Plautus using it very liberally when I read Amphitryo in college.
by galen697
Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:40 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneid 4.212
Replies: 7
Views: 1568

Re: Aeneid 4.212

fierywrath wrote: stop depending on sum! you dont need it! get it out of your head! sum es est sumus estis sunt what? who needs it??? :?:
Vergil certainly didn't. :lol:
by galen697
Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:45 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Si alius...
Replies: 7
Views: 1852

Si alius...

Something I've been wondering about lately when composing is this.

If Si aliquis is properly written as "si quis" (and the same is true for aliquid), what happens when writing "si alius"? Is that governed by the same rules regarding si, nisi, ni and ne?
by galen697
Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:32 pm
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: English to Latin
Replies: 2
Views: 2806

Re: English to Latin

This looks very well-written and authentic. Some comments I have: The word "castellum" implies a constructed fortress- not sure if this is the best word choice for "strong place" Possibly add a gerund at the "gave the signal to advance"/"signum progrediendi intulit" Since it's prose, why syncopate "...
by galen697
Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:17 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneid 4.212
Replies: 7
Views: 1568

Re: Aeneid 4.212

Imber Ranae wrote:Actually, I think §500 4 is more apposite:
It's a bit like the Greek circumstantial future participle of purpose, except it's only used with the accusative direct object of certain verbs, and it's always passive.
Reading that makes my head spin, and makes me glad to only be teaching Latin...
by galen697
Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:24 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Salvete
Replies: 2
Views: 898

Salvete

Salvete, omnes.

My name is Matt and I'm a 2nd-year Latin teacher in the Dayton OH area. Just found this board and it looks like a great resource for communication.
by galen697
Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: He doth nothing but talk of his horse.
Replies: 3
Views: 1073

Re: He doth nothing but talk of his horse.

and please give me a source to this quote it's very interesting and a Spanish King said something like "I speak Spanish to God,French to men, Italian to women,and German to my horse." help on this translation please That would go something like this: Hispanice Deo, Gallice viris/hominibus, Italice ...
by galen697
Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:17 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneid 4.212
Replies: 7
Views: 1568

Re: Aeneid 4.212

I taught this section to my AP class about two weeks ago. The line literally translates as "to whom a shore for plowing, and to whom laws of the place we gave". Arandum is not a periphrastic, but a gerundive of purpose with an elided "ad". The context is that Iarbas is complaining to Jupiter about h...