Search found 2973 matches

by mwh
Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:41 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: εἶπα in Doric
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: εἶπα in Doric

This is wildly wrong. The stem is not ιπ and dixi is not remotely cognate.
by mwh
Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: εἶπα in Doric
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: εἶπα in Doric

Yes, ἔειπα or εἶπα.
by mwh
Mon Feb 18, 2019 6:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?
Replies: 1
Views: 45

Re: Does Fugio serve as passive for Fugo?

No. Sure, fugo:fugio::iacio:iaceo, semantically speaking. The relationship is morphosyntactic, but “passive” is not involved. fugo and iacio are transitive verbs with regular passives of their own. They express actions from which fugio and iaceo result. celo is like fugo and iacio, while lateo is a ...
by mwh
Mon Feb 18, 2019 3:39 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Bowen's Advanced Greek Unseens
Replies: 73
Views: 4388

Re: Bowen's Advanced Greek Unseens

As I said, I haven’t been through either of your versions of the Dio, but in.the first sentence I see ἄλλος τοιοῦτος τυχὸν ἐμοῦ καταψευσόμενος, where τυχὸν is quasi-adverbial, “perhaps.” I expect there’s more to be put right yet. I haven’t looked at the new one. It would make life easier for your co...
by mwh
Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:50 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Bowen's Advanced Greek Unseens
Replies: 73
Views: 4388

Re: Bowen's Advanced Greek Unseens

πάλαι τοῦτον ἀμφιγνοῶν ἠπίστουν ὅμως Not “for a while now, though being unsure of this man, I nevertheless recognized him.” “I’d long been thinking maybe I knew this man but I mistrusted the identification all the same.” ἐπεὶ δὲ σαφῶς αὐτὸν ἔγνωκα “But now that I recognize him clearly, …” I haven’t ...
by mwh
Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Oxford Classics degree overhaul
Replies: 3
Views: 120

Re: Oxford Classics degree overhaul

The only thing that seems initially odd about the figures(not counting the absurdly high number of Firsts, no longer odd) is that women do proportionately better in Mods than in Finals. But Finals require more competence in both languages, so it’s extra tough for women to catch up with the “public” ...
by mwh
Sun Feb 17, 2019 3:30 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Translation of the Phrase Τυγχάνει Συντελείας
Replies: 17
Views: 341

Re: Translation of the Phrase Τυγχάνει Συντελείας

Excuse me, but this is a ridiculous thread, as all of the OP's are. (He is fixated on parousia in the NT.) His complete ignorance of both Greek and grammar means that he asks tomfool questions and cannot even begin to understand the answers he is given. And now the thread seems to have turned into a...
by mwh
Fri Feb 15, 2019 11:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 1st Catilinarian II.4
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: 1st Catilinarian II.4

They’re the direct objects of remorata est (a deponent verb). Death didn’t keep them waiting a single day, that’s to say they were executed without delay.

No follow-up questions needed I hope.
by mwh
Fri Feb 15, 2019 9:27 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Minimal pairs in aspiration
Replies: 14
Views: 324

Re: Minimal pairs in aspiration

Chommoda dicebat, si quando commoda vellet   dicere, et insidias Arrius hinsidias. et tum mirifice sperabat se esse locutum,   cum quantum poterat dixerat hinsidias. Credo, sic mater, sic liber avunculus eius,   sic maternus avus dixerat atque avia. Hoc misso in Syriam requierant omnibus aures:   au...
by mwh
Fri Feb 15, 2019 3:17 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Minimal pairs in aspiration
Replies: 14
Views: 324

Re: Minimal pairs in aspiration

To answer your question: I have no interest at all in lists of words allegedly distinguished by accent alone. Such words are all distinguished by something else as well, something more important (meaning, for one). Inexperienced readers do sometimes confuse βασίλεια and βασιλεία. But that provides a...
by mwh
Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:41 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Minimal pairs in aspiration
Replies: 14
Views: 324

Re: Minimal pairs in aspiration

ἄν and ἅν are both used in “Doric” lyric (incl. tragedy). But ἄν is short, ἅν long.
With many of the others the difference is merely orthographic or dialectal. And in context there’d be no confusion with any of them. I think this is a silly game.
by mwh
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:29 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translation or translation?
Replies: 24
Views: 899

Re: Translation or translation?

I think it goes beyond euphemism (a term I thought of using earlier but didn't—or did I?). It represents an imagined world in which amfipoloi are just that, attendants, with no necessary implication of slave status. (Rather different from the Downton Abbey world, in which hired servants are hired se...
by mwh
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:20 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Brainstorming for a dissertation in Greek
Replies: 9
Views: 303

Re: Brainstorming for a dissertation in Greek

Can’t you or your library use Interlibrary Loan services to get hold of materials? Two crucial questions: Are you sufficiently motivated and unencumbered to finish? (Most people accepted into PhD programs never finish.) Are you looking to find a job in the field when you finish? (If so, examine—and ...
by mwh
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:15 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The section on stress in Vox Graeca
Replies: 9
Views: 506

Re: The section on stress in Vox Graeca

What I do is substitute stress for pitch. That's to say, I put some stress—not more than I can help—on the accented syllables (ignoring graves), and let the intonation take care of itself. What’s paramount, at least in verse and non-koine prose, is a sense of the rhythm, which is primarily a functio...
by mwh
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

Thanks to Barry and bpk for setting me straight about the Hebrew.
by mwh
Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:02 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

Sargon (father of Sennacherib) had done the same much earlier.

My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; look on my works, ye mighty, and despair. But we do have some stupendous surviving works of Sargon.
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:18 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The section on stress in Vox Graeca
Replies: 9
Views: 506

Re: The section on stress in Vox Graeca

The practical problem is that hardly any native speaker of English is capable of divorcing pitch from stress. And if we could hear an ancient Greek speaking—which we can’t—only a highly trained phonetician would be able to tell just what was going on. We fool ourselves if we think we can reproduce a...
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

In the Hebrew Tanakh, in Ezekiel, I see that “king of kings” is simply the same word repeated (undeclined of course), differentiated from the king of Babylon, the greatest king of the time (Nebuchadnezzar, not a favorite of the Israelites!). “King king” certainly trumps “Babylon king.” It’s the same...
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:45 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

Barry, you missed my more recent post, supplementing the one you quote. The difference is more than stylistic.
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:27 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

It doesn’t have to be tied to Persian. βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων is an NT variation on the Septuagint’s βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλέων (Exekiel, also Daniel), reflective of Jesus’ non-secular status as king. There were a number of earthly rulers but the Christian claim is that the Christ is king of them all.
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:48 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;
Replies: 19
Views: 532

Re: Βασιλεὺς τῶν βασιλευόντων;

Μαρτυρεῖ δὲ ὁ μακάριος Πολύκαρπος doesn’t mean “Polycarp was martyred” but “Polycarp testifies.” The quote follows. And βασιλεύοντος δὲ εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας ⸀Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ is a genitive absolute, “in the everlasting reign of JC”, as in the regular bureaucratic dating formula ἀνθυπατεύοντος Στατίου Κοδράτ...
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:16 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Word Indentification
Replies: 7
Views: 198

Re: Word Indentification

μηδ’ Ηρακλῆς πρὸς δύω, proverbial, “not even Heracles [could prevail] against two.” (δύω would more correctly be written δύο.) The Latin translates it. Not even H. is a match for two opponents.
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:13 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: *Some savage difficulties appear while exercising greek*
Replies: 4
Views: 183

Re: *Some savage difficulties appear while exercising greek*

1. ἅμα enhances the idea of togetherness.
2. τοι adds a note of assurance to the negative.
3. “Take hold of his right hand.”
by mwh
Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: *Some savage difficulties appear while exercising greek*
Replies: 4
Views: 183

Re: *Some savage difficulties appear while exercising greek*

1. διαλλάχθητε “Be reconciled” or “Change from the previous enmity (τῆς πρόσθεν ἔχθρας) into friends, along with your mother (μητρὸς μέτα).” She’s addressing her children, and is pretending to want to patch up her quarrel with Jason who has dumped her. 2. οὔ τοι σοῖς ἀπιστήσω λόγοις “I won’t distrus...
by mwh
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:55 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Word Indentification
Replies: 7
Views: 198

Re: Word Indentification

Yes this confirms ποιητικὴ.

"Sensus nonnullos … latere didici." Won’t this mean not "I learned to conceal several senses” but “I have learnt that quite a number of meanings lie hidden beneath the surface”?

(And vocat can hardly mean “one calls”: “he calls”? vocatur, vocant?)
by mwh
Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:44 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translation or translation?
Replies: 24
Views: 899

Re: Translation or translation?

You may call me simpleminded but I don’t take quite this view of the relation between author’s text and a translation. I’d argue that the text is fixed (to use your term), even though (if we’re talking theory) its “meaning” is not. The original text has priority over the translation, and if a transl...
by mwh
Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:33 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Word Indentification
Replies: 7
Views: 198

Re: Word Indentification

Or the first might be ποιητικὴ. If you give us some context we'll probably be able to tell.
by mwh
Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:18 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translation or translation?
Replies: 24
Views: 899

Re: Translation or translation?

the question sets up a false antithesis between the author and translator There’s surely nothing false about the antithesis. Traduttori traditori. A good translator tries to minimize the gap between her translation and the original, but a gap is inevitable, and when it comes to Homer is inevitably ...
by mwh
Sat Feb 09, 2019 2:10 am
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Flagrat domus nostra
Replies: 12
Views: 240

Re: Flagrat domus nostra

sine inaequalitate augente is more English than Latin. First you have to learn how Latin says things. You are working with the words, when you should be working with the concepts. There are lots of books on Latin composition, most of them very old and unengaging. I don’t know Postgate’s Sermo Latinu...
by mwh
Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:34 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translation or translation?
Replies: 24
Views: 899

Re: Translation or translation?

Emily Wilson made a good point when she said that most Classics students are encouraged to think of what they’re doing as learning “to translate,” as opposed to learning to understand. The original text is seen as a problem to which a clunky “literal” translation is a solution and Hanink makes a sim...
by mwh
Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:11 pm
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Flagrat domus nostra
Replies: 12
Views: 240

Re: Flagrat domus nostra

"Our house is on fire. I am here to say, our house is on fire. You proffer "Flagrat domus nostra. Huc veni professum domum nostram ardere.” But it’s important not to use different words for the repeated “on fire.” And professum is a bit too fancy. Use simple Latin for simple English. E.g. "Flagrat d...
by mwh
Tue Feb 05, 2019 3:09 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Lysistrata Materials
Replies: 11
Views: 643

Re: Lysistrata Materials

I took a glance at a little bit of the dialogue of Lampito, from which I will give just one line οὔχ, ἇς πόδας κ᾽ ἔχωντι ταὶ τριήρεες, l. 173, for which there are two variants. One of them is that ἔχωντι, Doric according to LSJ, was changed from ἔχοντι in the codices. Obviously there is a good deal...
by mwh
Tue Feb 05, 2019 3:03 pm
Forum: Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry
Topic: Found this a-Musing
Replies: 4
Views: 396

Re: Found this a-Musing

As you guessed, it is indeed Hesiod, as they process to Olympus at the beginning of the Theogony. Such creatures typically come in threes (the Fates, the Hours, the Graces, …), and originally no doubt the Muses were three in number. Hesiod triples again, and characteristically makes up names for them.
by mwh
Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Mixed conditional
Replies: 7
Views: 320

Re: Mixed conditional

I really don’t know. I was just assuming. But it’s a very long book, and I don’t know how robust a paperback would be. I should probably tone down my enthusiasm. His treatment of the perfect indicative seeks to elide correspondence with the Greek aorist/perfect differentiation. And I doubt I have th...
by mwh
Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Jerome and the Lion Latin
Replies: 3
Views: 177

Re: Jerome and the Lion Latin

It’s a very old tale, probably transferred to Jerome (Geronimus) from Gerasimus, based in turn on the fable of Androcles and the lion. There must be lots of Latin versions. Check Laura Gibbs’ Aesop’s Fables.
by mwh
Wed Jan 30, 2019 9:34 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: what does "secl. ci." in a criticall apparatus mean?
Replies: 20
Views: 496

Re: what does "secl. ci." in a criticall apparatus mean?

I’d thought of asyndeton (which would want a high stop not a comma before it) but dismissed it as being too choppy. We’re already in an asyndetic sentence (επειδαν αἱ επιθυμιαι κτλ). I suppose it’s possible, but I don’t like it. It's a stylistic judgment, and you won’t find many better judges of Pla...
by mwh
Wed Jan 30, 2019 8:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Mixed conditional
Replies: 7
Views: 320

Re: Mixed conditional

Yes Pinkster will be of limited use to most of us until it's available on line (but there is an extensive google preview). And yes much of it is old hat: Latin syntax remains what it always was, with or without "modality." The bare facts are in A&G, or most of them, and people who have never used an...
by mwh
Wed Jan 30, 2019 8:10 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: what does "secl. ci." in a criticall apparatus mean?
Replies: 20
Views: 496

Re: what does "secl. ci." in a criticall apparatus mean?

To clarify. I have no wish to discourage any enquiry. My post was meant to encourage—to encourage learning how to decipher an app.crit. (since that was what the original question was about) and to encourage reading more Plato. As to whether or not ἐστι (however accented) belongs in the text: Without...
by mwh
Wed Jan 30, 2019 3:30 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Mixed conditional
Replies: 7
Views: 320

Re: Mixed conditional

Callisper, certainly it can sometimes be useful to talk in terms of modality, but with respect I’m not at all sure of the relevance of adducing Dido’s "non potui abreptum divellere corpus et undis / spargere?”, where non potui does not mean “Would I not have been able” and there’s not even an implie...
by mwh
Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Mixed conditional
Replies: 7
Views: 320

Re: Mixed conditional

It’s rhetorically stronger, that’s all. Death was to be feared, if it could keep you company. (The moral being death is not to be feared: when it comes it comes, then it’s all over. It doesn't hang around.) It reminds me of Tacitus’ snappy verdict on the Emperor Galba: capax imperii, nisi imperasset...