Search found 1027 matches

by Barry Hofstetter
Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:44 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Unit 21, Part II
Replies: 5
Views: 140

Re: Unit 21, Part II

It doesn't matter when it takes place for you. It matters when it takes place in the context of the sentence. That's what determines your sequence of tenses. Yes, you would used the future infinitive here, as your answer key correctly does.
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:51 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Unit 21, Part II
Replies: 5
Views: 140

Re: Unit 21, Part II

Lukas, as others have observed, many of the difficulties you have would be solved if you memorized your paradigms and reviewed them regularly. Build in a cycle of review: every time you start a new section, go back and review an old one. Start at the beginning and spend 5 minutes with the paradigms ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 16, 2019 4:39 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Secular uses of εις.
Replies: 24
Views: 646

Re: Secular uses of εις.

Interesting. I don't think the Greek preposition narrows it down anymore than the English "for." "Unto" is not helpful -- it's simply an archaism for "to" and occasionally "until." This is one of those places where NT Greek students learn that reference to "the Greek" is not going to be as helpful a...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:45 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Secular uses of εις.
Replies: 24
Views: 646

Re: Secular uses of εις.

Hylander wrote:
Wed Oct 16, 2019 3:58 am
So what does the Greek really mean? I'm at a loss.
ἐγὼ μὲν ὑμᾶς βαπτίζω ἐν ὕδατι εἰς μετάνοιαν...

I've always taken it in the very broad sense of "with regard to." Most EV's use "for" which itself can be read in more than one way.
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 15, 2019 2:21 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Unemphatic v. Emphatic
Replies: 5
Views: 204

Re: Unemphatic v. Emphatic

OK, so it sounds like emphasis. Perhaps it is similar to italics in English? I went to the store -- unemphatic. I went to the store -- emphatic Actually, not so much. Usually it has to do with some sort of of contrast, an "unexpected" shift in subject or object, or the like, and when the pronoun is...
by Barry Hofstetter
Mon Oct 14, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Secular uses of εις.
Replies: 24
Views: 646

Re: Secular uses of εις.

I am likely too prejudiced against anyone who commits the error of dividing Greek between "secular" and the NT. But the introduction to this topic felt far too internet-debatey to me, given his reluctance to bring up what he was actually asking about, though it was obvious enough from the start to ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Mon Oct 14, 2019 12:02 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Secular uses of εις.
Replies: 24
Views: 646

Re: Secular uses of εις.

I suggest trying something like "I found claim X in source Y, anything to it?" instead of playing a forum version of 20 questions. Just do me the favor of deleting my account. Deutsch Well, Deutsch, you may not be around to read this, but this is the sort of question that can be answered by the lex...
by Barry Hofstetter
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More help with long passages in colebourne
Replies: 3
Views: 183

Re: help with long passages in colebourne

Just in general, I don't have Colebourne, but I assume he doesn't give exercises without having first covered the syntax you are supposed to be using in your composition? 1. Theseus king of the Atheniens Rex Atheniensium not rex Athenarum king of Athens I believe this rule, using the genitive of the...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Oct 10, 2019 4:59 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: iota subscript
Replies: 10
Views: 309

Re: iota subscript

There's actually been quite a bit of discussion on this lately, more in NT Greek circles than in Classics. I would say that up until recently Erasmean pronunciation has been the rule, but not altogether (when I was an undergrad way back in the 20th century I had a professor who used a "modified hist...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:21 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What Latin words could I use or make up to mean "pan-causal temporal loop"
Replies: 9
Views: 377

Re: What Latin words could I use or make up to mean "pan-causal temporal loop"

In Greek, I would say something like ὃ ἐν πᾶσι κόσμοις ἑαυτὸ κινεῖ to refer to a self-caused event in every world, which sounds Aristotelian and makes more sense than the original English. Someone else can change that to Latin, since mine isn't good enough. A fun exercise is to take a translation o...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 09, 2019 2:35 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What Latin words could I use or make up to mean "pan-causal temporal loop"
Replies: 9
Views: 377

Re: What Latin words could I use or make up to mean "pan-causal temporal loop"

Zionswasd wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:10 am
Here I can clear it up for you, it means a causal or temporal loop in all worldlines, as opposed to just one worldline.
Somehow I don't think that will really answer Seneca's question :lol:
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 08, 2019 7:59 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Hdt 3.14
Replies: 3
Views: 200

Re: Hdt 3.14

Hi! I have a question about Herodotus 3.14, and it’s where Psammenitus is watching his daughter go into slavery. The words which puzzled me are the following (underlined): στείλας αὐτοῦ τὴν θυγατέρα ἐσθῆτι δουληίῃ ἐξέπεμπε ἐπ᾽ ὕδωρ ἔχουσαν ὑδρήιον, συνέπεμπε δὲ καὶ ἄλλας παρθένους ἀπολέξας ἀνδρῶν τ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 08, 2019 1:46 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ..., ὁ δὲ σοφόν τι ἐζήτει καὶ ἐλθεῖν οὐκ ἤθελεν.
Replies: 5
Views: 218

Re: ..., ὁ δὲ σοφόν τι ἐζήτει καὶ ἐλθεῖν οὐκ ἤθελεν.

"A distant memory..." :) Here's a trick: every time you sit down to do the next section in your text, review a previous section (unit, chapter, whatever they call it). Not the exercises again, simply read through the explanations and examples. Start with chapter 1 doing one section each time, until ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:59 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: δέ
Replies: 7
Views: 373

Re: δέ

Using more recent meta-language, δέ is a discourse marker controlling the readers understanding of clauses/sentences in the flow of writing. Can't this be said of any word traditionally identified as a particle or conjunction? Actually, no. At least γέ can function as emphasizing a particular word,...
by Barry Hofstetter
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:39 pm
Forum: Civilization and Culture of the Greeks and Romans
Topic: Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze
Replies: 9
Views: 572

Re: Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze

Be sure to see the Piaggio machine, used to unroll the Herculaneum papyri. I never know what people can and can't access on the BBC outside of the UK but Inside Science yesterday had a very interesting item interviewing the team working on the X-ray CT scanning and 'virtual unrolling' of the papyri...
by Barry Hofstetter
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:37 pm
Forum: Civilization and Culture of the Greeks and Romans
Topic: Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze
Replies: 9
Views: 572

Re: Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze

Be sure to see the Piaggio machine, used to unroll the Herculaneum papyri. I'll pm you a piece of mine on the Francois vase. Florence wowed me from the moment I saw it, and it is still my favourite city in the world. The crowds will still be bad but a bit less so at the end of the month. I shall no...
by Barry Hofstetter
Fri Oct 04, 2019 11:28 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: δέ
Replies: 7
Views: 373

Re: δέ

I should explain that the quote from me at the head of this thread was what I wrote in response to a beginner’s asking how to translate δέ (a question no-one had answered for him). It is not what I would say about the function of δέ. You were mainly cited to give context to Joel's comments. I’m not...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Oct 03, 2019 1:53 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: δέ
Replies: 7
Views: 373

δέ

δέ can be translated by “and” or by “but” or (often best) by nothing at all, according to the context. Often it’s just a nondescript sentence connective, as in this passage. I was thinking of starting a thread on this, but didn't get to it before your comment. I feel like the importance of δέ in Gr...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 02, 2019 5:08 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ετρεψα or ετραπον
Replies: 15
Views: 506

Re: ετρεψα or ετραπον

M. is saying that the strong aorist is poetic and intransitive (although Barry has an example he thinks is transitive in Pindar). Thinks? It's clearly transitive. Thanks Joel. It’s clear from the run of the sentence alone (not to mention Greek usage!) that “poetic and transitive” was meant, contras...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:46 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Reading gospel of John in Greek
Replies: 2
Views: 208

Re: Reading gospel of John in Greek

This sounds like a very good plan. Plato and GoJ at the same time... Your improvement may be incremental, but it will be real.
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:43 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ετρεψα or ετραπον
Replies: 15
Views: 506

Re: ετρεψα or ετραπον

Does Mastronarde really say that the strong aorist active ἔτραπον is intransitive in sense? That’s wrong. It’s routinely transitive. I guess that’s what he meant to say. (LSJ’s Pindar reference fastened on by Barry is not “Od.” but “O.”, the Olympians, and there’s nothing remarkable about it.) I ci...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:47 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ἐξέσται?
Replies: 7
Views: 296

Re: ἐξέσται?

ευχαριστώ! I took German about 30 years ago and forgot almost all of it. One thing I remember in grammar classes is that sometimes things are a certain way just because that is the way it is. :) Yes, and at the beginning level it's sometimes better to take it on faith, and worry about the "why" of ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 01, 2019 2:57 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Future of σπένδω?
Replies: 26
Views: 699

Re: Future of σπένδω?

"Irregular verbs don't really exist" is right up there with "Deponents don't really exist." Really? But for pragmatic reasons I also rejoice that a number of resources have lists of these "non-existent" verbs, and I will continue to talk about deponents because it's handy to explain why certain verb...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:46 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ετρεψα or ετραπον
Replies: 15
Views: 506

Re: ετρεψα or ετραπον

M. p 134 "The strong aorist active ἔτραπον, from τρέπω, is poetic and intransitive in sense, but the middle, ἐτραπόμην, is used in Attic with the intransitive meaning turn." This is not to contradict anyone but to show that the answers to questions can often be found in M.'s text itself. No harm in...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 01, 2019 1:29 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

Here is another fun example of the "inter-linear" nature of the LXX in 2 Kingdoms: 20:17 καὶ προσήγγισεν πρὸς αὐτήν, καὶ εἶπεν ἡ γυνή Εἰ σὺ εἶ Ἰωάβ; ὁ δὲ εἶπεν Ἐγώ. εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ Ἄκουσον τοὺς λόγους τῆς δούλης σου· καὶ εἶπεν Ἰωάβ Ἀκούω ἐγώ εἰμι. Ἀκούω ἐγώ εἰμι, very good Greek not, but a very wooden...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:29 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ετρεψα or ετραπον
Replies: 15
Views: 506

Re: ετρεψα or ετραπον

τρέπω, Il.8.399, etc.: fut. τρέψω 15.261, etc.: aor. 1 ἔτρεψα 18.469, etc., Ep. τρέψα 16.645: besides aor. 1 Hom. has aor. 2 ἔτρᾰπον, Od.4.294, al., also Pi.O.10(11).15 (sts. also intr., v. περιτρέπω II and perh. Il.16.657, cf. III fin.): Aeol. aor. ἔτροπον Liddell, H. G., Scott, R., Jones, H. S., &...
by Barry Hofstetter
Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:39 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Getting μέλλω
Replies: 6
Views: 338

Re: Getting μέλλω

I should have written, "He was about to die." That is my guess. Yes, I am reading what you say, but sometimes I still ask questions. Do not get after me for that. I ask a lot of questions. Don't feel bad about asking questions, but I think his point is that with a little more effort you might have ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Sep 26, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Query on Theognis
Replies: 9
Views: 424

Re: Query on Theognis

I'll let someone else comment on your composition, but concerning the relative clause in Theognis, I see how you are trying to read it, as though it should be something like <τούτοις> οἳ πάρησαν "a boor to those who are present" with the pronoun attracted into the case of the presumed antecedent. We...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Sep 25, 2019 11:39 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Unit 17 Trouble Translating
Replies: 3
Views: 198

Re: Unit 17 Trouble Translating

I am having trouble translating parts of sentences 2 & 3 of Unit 17, Part II. With Χάλον ὄνομα, I guessed Χάλον is the name of a river. ὄνομα is in the accusative. The answer book translates it as "Xalon by name." Isn't "by" supposed to be translated with a dative if there is no preposition? How di...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Sep 24, 2019 3:04 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: ἡγεμόσι τισί(ν)
Replies: 3
Views: 199

Re: ἡγεμόσι τισί(ν)

Lukas wrote:
Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:58 pm
Ευχαριστώ!

I looked at the wrong chart. I should have looked on the page you mentioned. Plus I was not sure if I should
start with the genitive or nominative.
The genitive regularly supplies the stem for the oblique forms.
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

Barry, What is your point? And why do you add “with no prior exposure to the LXX”? No-one’s disputing that readers (or auditors) would have found the LXX obscure in places. They dealt with it. The Greek was all a bit weird, after all, but as I said, ”It was understood (or not) without the Hebrew.” ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Tue Sep 24, 2019 1:50 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

Here is another example (and there are more than a few) where a Greek reader with no prior exposure to the LXX might find the Greek a bit obscure, 2 Kgdms 17:19.

καὶ ἔλαβεν ἡ γυνὴ καὶ διεπέτασεν τὸ ἐπικάλυμμα ἐπὶ πρόσωπον τοῦ λάκκου καὶ ἔψυξεν ἐπʼ αὐτῷ ἀραφώθ, καὶ οὐκ ἐγνώσθη ῥῆμα...
by Barry Hofstetter
Mon Sep 23, 2019 3:20 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Supter with acc
Replies: 9
Views: 1221

Re: Supter with acc

I find it more rewarding to read Latin than grammars. supter: I think not only of Lucretius’ proemium but also of Catullus’ pathetic poem on the death of his brother, Cat.66: Troia Rhoeteo quem supter litore tellus, a line that Vergil would have been proud of. There supter is no different from sub,...
by Barry Hofstetter
Sat Sep 21, 2019 2:16 pm
Forum: Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry
Topic: The Blind Poet and the Blind Reader
Replies: 45
Views: 1706

Re: The Blind Poet and the Blind Reader

I find it fascinating that people are bringing up precisely the same sort of hermeneutical issues with regard to Homer as are often brought up with biblical interpretation. That says something about the value we place on Homer, I should think. As for authorial intent and perspective, well we can say...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Sep 19, 2019 5:55 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: adjective noun agreement
Replies: 4
Views: 245

Re: adjective noun agreement

(like leviter armātī, which I doubt ever occurs) On the contrary, I am sure it does. Perfectly sound classical Latin. Well, I couldn't let that go so I did a search to prove you wrong, and I ended up proving me wrong. I found it once in Seneca's De Beneficiis, and 18 times in Curtius' Alexander. Yo...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Sep 19, 2019 12:17 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: adjective noun agreement
Replies: 4
Views: 245

Re: adjective noun agreement

levis is genitive and goes with armaturae. It's the armor that is light, not the soldiers. Here is a good example where the Latin construction is different from what one would expect from the English expression and the translations. Armatūra is a noun, meaning "armament." The English would lead us ...
by Barry Hofstetter
Thu Sep 19, 2019 6:33 am
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Book Notice
Replies: 5
Views: 393

Re: Book Notice

This is simply an "as is" book notice. Read the descriptions and the blurbs, and draw your own conclusions. I think the endorsement from Horrocks suggests it might be worthwhile, but any questions about the book and its content are best answered by the book itself.
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:04 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

Barry, thanks for the links, but do you not realize that Joel was correcting you? Examples like this don’t compromise the “assumption” (as you strangely termed it) that the Greek was self-standing. Certainly it was a bit weird, but It was understood (or not) without the Hebrew, from which it had be...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Sep 18, 2019 6:21 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

I would think that ταῖς ἁβαρκηνείν is some Hebrew name for flora/fauna/landscape of the desert and physically suited for metaphorical threshing. From Barry's link, In rare cases they left words withouttranslation, representing them with Greek characters, for example barqanim (briers?)represented as...
by Barry Hofstetter
Wed Sep 18, 2019 4:33 pm
Forum: Koine and Biblical and Medieval Greek
Topic: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX
Replies: 20
Views: 1050

Re: Psalm 92: 3-4 LXX

Nice introduction to the LXX by Emanuel Tov:

http://www.accordancefiles1.com/products/introlxx1.pdf