Search found 231 matches

by Damoetas
Sun Jan 24, 2016 6:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin poetry translation: verse or prose?
Replies: 3
Views: 1514

Re: Latin poetry translation: verse or prose?

It depends on the purpose. I would use a prose translation, like those found in the Loebs, if I am skimming a text quickly to get an idea of what it says; then I would read it more closely in the original. Prose translations are also helpful to find out how the translator has interpreted a particula...
by Damoetas
Sun Jan 24, 2016 5:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Word Order: A Glimpse into the Vaults
Replies: 11
Views: 3498

Re: Latin Word Order: A Glimpse into the Vaults

For those who are interested in a modern linguistic treatment of this problem, see Olga Spevak, Constituent Order in Classical Latin Prose (Benjamins, 2010). The Bryn Mawr review online has a helpful summary: http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2011/2011-06-30.html.
by Damoetas
Mon Nov 30, 2015 5:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "ipse . . . is" as intensifiers for 1st person
Replies: 4
Views: 1603

Re: "ipse . . . is" as intensifiers for 1st person

Your translation is correct, but just to be extra clear: īs in this sentence is equal to eīs - i.e., dative plural of is, ea, id . It has no connection to the first person subject of the sentence. It's the dative object of persuāsī , and is in turn modified by quī : "I persuaded those ( īs ) who ( q...
by Damoetas
Sat Sep 12, 2015 8:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Question of Ecclesiastical Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 2279

Re: Question of Ecclesiastical Latin

Thanks, @ÓBuadhaigh, that's very interesting!
by Damoetas
Sat Sep 12, 2015 3:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Question of Ecclesiastical Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 2279

Re: Question of Ecclesiastical Latin

Greetings, The English translation that you quoted is very different from the Latin text. Perhaps the Vietnamese text is more of a summary or paraphrase than a translation - the meaning is similar, but does not match word for word or even sentence for sentence. (Or perhaps it comes from a different ...
by Damoetas
Thu Aug 27, 2015 2:48 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: BC/AD vs BCE/CE
Replies: 31
Views: 11721

Re: BC/AD vs BCE/CE

You know, I entered this discussion not caring about it very strongly either way. But after hearing the type of arguments made by @calvinist, @mwh, and @jedsaith.... I'm sure you all are very nice people, and we can talk about Greek and Latin amicably on other threads. But you strengthen my resolve ...
by Damoetas
Thu Aug 27, 2015 1:01 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: BC/AD vs BCE/CE
Replies: 31
Views: 11721

Re: BC/AD vs BCE/CE

Interesting points all around.... I think this discussion highlights the two ways of looking at it: You can say, "If we change one thing in X direction, we should logically do every other more extreme thing in that direction, ad absurdum . Therefore, it would be stupid to change anything." Or you ca...
by Damoetas
Wed Aug 26, 2015 9:43 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: BC/AD vs BCE/CE
Replies: 31
Views: 11721

Re: BC/AD vs BCE/CE

If you're asking me, no, I don't think it's Orwellian (for the reasons I mentioned above). Doublespeak is something quite different.
jeidsath wrote:So I take it that BC/AD -> BCE/CE is doubleplus good and goodthinkful?
by Damoetas
Wed Aug 26, 2015 4:36 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: BC/AD vs BCE/CE
Replies: 31
Views: 11721

Re: BC/AD vs BCE/CE

Since I am currently procrastinating from something else I should be writing, I will offer some thoughts on the subject. The argument against BC/AD is not exactly that it "'forces' religion or religious beliefs" on anyone, in the sense of forcing them to convert or whatever. The argument is that it ...
by Damoetas
Tue Aug 25, 2015 3:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: translation difficulty
Replies: 2
Views: 1268

Re: translation difficulty

That's right. Another way to think about it is, qui pueros ferebant is a relative clause, and you don't normally see negators or other important words from the main clause shifted inside the relative clause. Whenever you see a relative clause (or any subordinate clause, for that matter), it helps to...
by Damoetas
Sat Aug 22, 2015 1:37 pm
Forum: Civilization and Culture of the Greeks and Romans
Topic: Is Caesar "Boring"?
Replies: 12
Views: 7812

Re: Is Caesar "Boring"?

A great book on this topic is Andrew Riggsby, Caesar in Gaul and Rome: War in Words (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006). Here's the link to a Bryn Mawr review: http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2006/2006-09-32.html
by Damoetas
Sun Nov 30, 2014 10:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: History of Classical Languages Pedagogy
Replies: 10
Views: 4045

Re: History of Classical Languages Pedagogy

I think we still use a lot of pre-WWII language pedagogy, and this is not necessarily a good thing!
by Damoetas
Wed Nov 26, 2014 8:42 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation question: agreement of cases
Replies: 2
Views: 1119

Re: Translation question: agreement of cases

This doesn't deal with your specific grammatical questions, but I wonder if you are trying to make the sentence too "dense" - i.e. keeping it as one long period, with so many subordinate clauses and appositions. If I were tackling this, I might start by breaking it into four or five completely indep...
by Damoetas
Tue Nov 18, 2014 7:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: indici
Replies: 2
Views: 1244

Re: indici

It's from indico, indicere, indixi, indictus, "to declare publicly, to proclaim, publish, announce, to appoint" (http://logeion.uchicago.edu/index.html#indico)
by Damoetas
Tue Nov 04, 2014 2:26 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Mastonade difficult exercise sentence
Replies: 24
Views: 6797

Re: Mastonade difficult exercise sentence

Here's a few hints: θεῶν τις = "one of the gods" (not from θεάομαι, so nothing to do with seeing). τούτου = "this man," who is further identified by the relative clause beginning with ὃς. The relative clause has two parts, describing what the man was 1) "saying" (ἔλεγε) and 2) "doing" (ἐποίει). Note...
by Damoetas
Tue Oct 14, 2014 10:26 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Bina tantum spolia opima...
Replies: 4
Views: 2132

Re: Bina tantum spolia opima...

"... so rare was the fortune [of seizing this honor]."
by Damoetas
Sun Oct 05, 2014 4:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "Quote ... end quote" in Latin?
Replies: 3
Views: 1783

Re: "Quote ... end quote" in Latin?

As I see it, you have three options: 1) Introduce the quotation with something like, Haec scripsit: Then when you're done, make a summarizing statement: Haec igitur dicit in libro suo... 2) Similarly to the previous, use in introductory formula, and then parenthetic inquit within the quotation. Cice...
by Damoetas
Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:12 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: how to translate "board games"
Replies: 2
Views: 1513

Re: how to translate "board games"

Ludi tabulares But, like all translations of things that didn't exist in ancient Rome (or existed, but not in the specific form they do today), it is helpful to add an explanatory gloss. So, use the translation, and then add a paraphrase in Latin explaining what it is. This is both good practice fo...
by Damoetas
Wed Sep 24, 2014 3:07 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: πλησιάζει ὁ ἥλιος - perihelion or mid-summer? (so for πόρρω)
Replies: 17
Views: 3885

Re: πλησιάζει ὁ ἥλιος - perihelion or mid-summer? (so for πό

Great discussion everyone! And, I don't want to belabor it, but I think we can still get an even clearer picture of what Aristotle was describing: Aristotle probably didn't think he was "expressing it in layman's terms." He was using normal terminology based on his mental picture of the universe. Th...
by Damoetas
Wed Sep 24, 2014 3:49 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: πλησιάζει ὁ ἥλιος - perihelion or mid-summer? (so for πόρρω)
Replies: 17
Views: 3885

Re: πλησιάζει ὁ ἥλιος - perihelion or mid-summer? (so for πό

To me it seems almost certain that when Aristotle talks about the sun being "near" and "far," he simply means summer and winter. From the northern hemisphere perspective, the sun is "near" (πλησιάζει) in summer (i.e. nearly overhead), and "far away" in the winter (i.e., low on the southern horizon)....
by Damoetas
Tue Sep 23, 2014 10:15 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: translating
Replies: 4
Views: 1439

Re: translating

Without any context, there's no reason to prefer one or the other. But yes, it's worth pointing out that σῴζομαι can mean either "I am saved" (repeatedly, or as a general statement) or "I am being saved" (as a current, ongoing process). Would you not prefer the present continuous in English? "I am b...
by Damoetas
Tue Sep 23, 2014 9:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Book after Caesar?
Replies: 9
Views: 3319

Re: Book after Caesar?

That sounds good - I second the recommendation of De Senectute and De Amicitia . Student editions at this level don't contain excerpts or abridgments. They contain the actual text, a commentary at the back (designed to explain grammar and difficult vocabulary, rather than to give very "scholarly" in...
by Damoetas
Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:25 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: translating
Replies: 4
Views: 1439

Re: translating

This looks like a sentence from a beginning grammar of New Testament Greek. It means, "I am saved by the brother" (or: "by my brother").

Are you enrolled in a beginning Greek class? We can help more if you tell us a little more about your situation, your current level, and what your goals are.
by Damoetas
Wed Sep 17, 2014 4:01 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How do you memorize all those Latin noun and verb endings?
Replies: 18
Views: 13974

Re: How do you memorize all those Latin noun and verb ending

I suspect part of the problem may be that you're thinking of the endings as things to be memorized, all by themselves, in isolation. Instead, the goal should be to associate them with meaning , and meaning requires a context. So I echo what Shenoute suggested, that you should supplement the rote mem...
by Damoetas
Wed Jul 30, 2014 4:50 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: to spirit or not to spirit?
Replies: 3
Views: 1431

Re: to spirit or not to spirit?

I think the question is about Modern Greek. The answer is that Modern Greek does not use the "spiritus" (breathing marks) at all, because the "h" sound is no longer pronounced. Also, there is only one form of accent, the acute (΄), where Ancient Greek had three kinds. Thus, σ'αγαπώ in Ancient Greek ...
by Damoetas
Thu Jun 05, 2014 2:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: recommend some very detailed grammars to me
Replies: 15
Views: 4677

Re: recommend some very detailed grammars to me

Here are two recent monographs on specific grammatical topics: Spevak, Olga. Constituent Order in Classical Latin Prose . John Benjamins, 2010. (https://benjamins.com/#catalog/books/slcs.117/main) ---. The Noun Phrase in Classical Latin Prose . Brill, 2014. (http://www.brill.com/products/book/noun-p...
by Damoetas
Sat May 03, 2014 3:00 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Writings about a high-school Latin course.
Replies: 20
Views: 6911

Re: Writings about a high-school Latin course.

"Celebration of knowledge," great! I'll be sure to use that on one of my classes....
by Damoetas
Sat Apr 19, 2014 4:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Writings about a high-school Latin course.
Replies: 20
Views: 6911

Re: Writings about a high-school Latin course.

Can you tell us what country you are in? It will be interesting to compare the different systems and methods that are used in various places.
by Damoetas
Wed Apr 02, 2014 4:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Writings about a high-school Latin course.
Replies: 20
Views: 6911

Re: Writings about a high-school Latin course.

Yes, stay on this thread, but with a new post each time. If you just make edits in your first post, it will get confusing as people respond to it, and it won't be clear which edit or entry they're referring to.
by Damoetas
Fri Mar 28, 2014 10:26 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Writings about a high-school Latin course.
Replies: 20
Views: 6911

Re: Writings about a high-school Latin course.

Yes, that would be good. I suggest writing new posts each time instead of editing the original post.
by Damoetas
Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:41 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: case with ou
Replies: 32
Views: 8697

Re: case with ou

Edited: If your interpretation is true, then Matthew did not know how to write Greek very clearly, because everyone who has read that passage for thousands of years has taken it to mean the exact opposite of what you think it means.
by Damoetas
Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:34 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo (adv?)
Replies: 12
Views: 3860

Re: quo (adv?)

Actually no: if someone says that in Latin - naves ferebantur ad eum locum ubi ventus ibat - it means, "The ships were being carried toward that place in which the wind was blowing [but it was not blowing across the intervening distance]." That's quite different from "The ships were being carried to...
by Damoetas
Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:52 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: quo (adv?)
Replies: 12
Views: 3860

Re: quo (adv?)

Good point, Interaxus, I was thinking the same thing.... Although, if the point of this exercise is to paraphrase quo , it helps if quo doesn't occur in the paraphrase! So we would have to go one step further and say: Naves ferebantur ad eum locum ad quem ventus ibat. But now this doesn't sound very...
by Damoetas
Sun Mar 23, 2014 7:35 pm
Forum: Composition Board
Topic: Puer qui numeravit stellas
Replies: 1
Views: 1963

Puer qui numeravit stellas

Here is my translation into Latin of a traditional story from Chiapas, Mexico. The original is in the Tzeltal language, published along with a Spanish translation in Leyendas y cuentos Tzeltales (Mexico City, 1983). My translation is based on the Spanish, which I can also post if anyone is intereste...
by Damoetas
Mon Mar 18, 2013 8:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: translation help
Replies: 1
Views: 1201

Re: translation help

It means: "What do I want? To live three meters [ten feet] above the clouds." Looks correct, although others might have small suggestions.
by Damoetas
Tue Oct 30, 2012 8:51 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Where to find Doric declensions?
Replies: 12
Views: 6387

Re: Where to find Doric declensions?

Most reference works don't list full paradigms for the other dialects besides Attic (and sometimes Homeric); they tell you the Attic forms, and then list how the other ones are different. There are good articles about dialects on the Aoidoi site: http://aoidoi.org/articles/
by Damoetas
Fri Aug 31, 2012 5:17 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translating the “4th class conditional”
Replies: 49
Views: 18248

Re: Translating the “4th class conditional”

The morpholigcal search also found it to be aor. opt. mid. but in the Epic and Ionic dialect. Again, 2nd aorist mid. according to Smyth is -ωλόμην with part. ὀλόμενος. 2nd aor. opt. mid. 3rd pl. then would be ὄλοιντο as above. Yes, epic forms are common in tragedy. Homer often has -οίατο for -οιντο...
by Damoetas
Fri Aug 31, 2012 2:45 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translating the “4th class conditional”
Replies: 49
Views: 18248

Re: Translating the “4th class conditional”

Why do you say ὀλοίατο is future optative? It looks aorist to me.
by Damoetas
Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:55 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translating the “4th class conditional”
Replies: 49
Views: 18248

Re: Translating the “4th class conditional”

Hey C. S., Wow, thanks for assembling all those quotations, looks like a lot of work! At several places in your posts, I see that you made comments like, "At first glance, none of these renderings appear to highlight the distinctive character of the optative in the protasis." Or, "He underlines the ...
by Damoetas
Tue Aug 21, 2012 2:18 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Translating the “4th class conditional”
Replies: 49
Views: 18248

Re: Translating the “4th class conditional”

If your focus is on the English words used to translate it: it's worth considering that English has changed a lot since Smyth and these other grammar books were written. "Should/would" was the standard phraseology at that time; these days, most people express the same idea by saying, "If I did X" or...