Search found 19 matches

by Iulia
Sun Dec 06, 2009 7:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: how to use "because"
Replies: 10
Views: 3103

Re: how to use "because"

ptolemyauletes wrote:I am still not sure about using tarda as an adjective here. It normally means 'slow' or 'sluggish'. I still feel the adverb 'tardius' would be better.
Also, noster Ptoleme, I meant to also ask why you suggest tardius rather than simply tarde? Gratias, /Iulia
by Iulia
Sun Dec 06, 2009 6:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: how to use "because"
Replies: 10
Views: 3103

Re: how to use "because"

Quis ut Deus wrote: For example, I want to say, "She left because it was late"
Or, if you wanted to convey the idea that she left because it was late in the day/evening, would sero from serus, -a, -um be a good fit? As in,

Discessit quod sero erat.
by Iulia
Sun Dec 06, 2009 2:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: LL translations
Replies: 4
Views: 1439

Re: LL translations

Is this quoted correctly? Simul Medus anulum e manu Lydia lapsum capit I would want to see E MANU LYDI AE : Then we could translate as "At the same time Medus seizes the ring fallen out of Lydia's hand (the hand OF Lydia)." I would prefer to see it not considered ablative as supra (dropped BY LYDIA)...
by Iulia
Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin; or the Empire of the Sign.
Replies: 34
Views: 10899

Re: Latin; or the Empire of the Sign.

I think the main problems are: 1) the way Latin is taught. I don't necessarily think that inductive methods are the best, but that's just because I don't learn well from inductive methods myself. I need to have things spelled out for me to be able to learn them, when it comes to languages. But lear...
by Iulia
Sun Jul 26, 2009 6:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aug. Conf. 1.9.15
Replies: 5
Views: 2143

Re: Aug. Conf. 1.9.15

Salve, eo ludo impediebar quominus celeriter discerem litteras, quibus maior deformius luderem. It might be fruitful also to look at the verb "impedire," as it is frequently used with quominus and the subjunctive (A&G 558b). But as to the second clause that begins with "quibus," both the thought and...
by Iulia
Sat Jul 25, 2009 2:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "sicco sinu" in Tib. 2.5.70
Replies: 9
Views: 2330

Re: "sicco sinu" in Tib. 2.5.70

Salve vir litterarum, quidquid Amalthea, quidquid Marpesia dixit Herophile, Phyto Graia quod admonuit, quotque Aniena sacras Tiburs per flumina sortes portarit sicco pertuleritque sinu, haec fore dixerunt belli mala signa cometen, multus ut in terras deplueretque lapis. I also like, in this context ...
by Iulia
Fri Jul 24, 2009 5:25 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation
Replies: 6
Views: 3133

Re: Translation

Salve Einhard! I was wondering about the last part in particular though. Is "and the spirit shall be sufficent (there shall be sufficent spirit) for me to proclaim your deeds" ok? Your translation seems just fine to me. I would add only that "spiritus" in Latin often has a connotation of actual brea...
by Iulia
Wed Jul 22, 2009 1:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation
Replies: 6
Views: 3133

Re: Translation

May I ask what were your thoughts in translating "scire matrem" as "to be born"? I ask because the child is addressed as "parve puer" leading me to suspect that a translation conveying the idea of growing up rather than of being born might work a bit better here. That might fit the overall sense of ...
by Iulia
Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: MEUS/MI Nominative/Vocative Rules
Replies: 20
Views: 7354

Re: MEUS/MI Nominative/Vocative Rules

As i said in the quote above it says that the vocative of meus can be meus. what does this mean? it implies the following: 1) MEUS + Voc or Nom (masc) Apparently (as it is discussed in the grammar books), there are Classical Latin sentences in our manuscripts which use MEUS as a vocative. However, ...
by Iulia
Thu Jul 09, 2009 4:32 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need feedback for this English to Latin translation
Replies: 8
Views: 2173

Re: Need feedback for this English to Latin translation

Re: 2. ut interdum commotio esset = "that every so often there is agitation" since this clause follows a main verb in the present tense [tanti momenti est ], I suspect that a verb in the Present Subjunctive (following the rule of the Sequence of Tenses) would be a bit more grammatical. tanti momenti...
by Iulia
Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Passive Prohibitions
Replies: 3
Views: 1487

Re: Passive Prohibitions

For a passive prohibition, you have several choices (though your idea of making nolle passive is not one of them as there are no passive forms for this verb, I'm sorry to report). Did your professor give you an idea of which construction he/she wanted you to use? One classical choice is ne + perfect...
by Iulia
Mon Mar 02, 2009 1:25 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun
Replies: 10
Views: 2745

Re: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun

No, as defuncto is the perfect passive participle from defungor, a deponent verb, and sepulto a perfect passive participle from sepelio, I would translate the phrase literally as: "with the one [i.e., the man we've been talking about here = Drusus"] having died and not yet having been buried." Howev...
by Iulia
Sun Mar 01, 2009 1:25 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun
Replies: 10
Views: 2745

Re: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun

Mihi dolet -- sorry if my note was unclear. Yes, it is definitely an Ablative Absolute. But (correct me if I am wrong) you were asking if a noun/pronoun should be supplied from context, and I am suggesting that "defuncto," though a participial adjective, is functioning as the noun here so there is n...
by Iulia
Sun Mar 01, 2009 3:26 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun
Replies: 10
Views: 2745

Re: Ablative absolute without a noun or pronoun

Wouldn't it perhaps be easiest to construe "defuncto" as a substantive adjective being used as a noun, to mean "the one having died"? (A&G 288) It seems to me an adjective used substantively in an Ablative Absolute is quite common -- "paucis interfectis" from Caesar springs readily to mind: "a few [...
by Iulia
Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with translation
Replies: 6
Views: 1768

Re: Help with translation

Well, Cicero might not have understood what you were trying to say ... he would have understood something more like "God spoke" or "God told" from "Deus memoravit."
by Iulia
Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:26 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Question: How do we know that EQVOS non EQVVS inter alia?
Replies: 8
Views: 2797

Re: Question: How do we know that EQVOS non EQVVS inter alia?

Loeb Classical Library has four volumes, "Remains of Old Latin," compiled by Warmington.
by Iulia
Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:56 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Grammar question please.
Replies: 14
Views: 4593

Re: Grammar question please.

To encapsulate the earlier responses, if you were required to furnish the genitive plural of 'equus,' exempli gratia, you would need to look up 'equus' in the dictionary. There, you will find its dictionary entry (which is first the nominative form, then the genitive ending, then the gender) as 'equ...
by Iulia
Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:35 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with translation
Replies: 6
Views: 1768

Re: Help with translation

Perhaps a more classical choice might be to use the verb 'meminisse.' In this case, the phrase "God remembers" would be rendered:

Deus meminit

There also seem on the web to be some references to Vulgate verses which use 'meminisse.'
by Iulia
Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Locative
Replies: 5
Views: 3013

Re: Locative

Technically, the Locative case is used only to describe the Place Where a person or event is. (Motion Towards or Motion From are different constructions.) The Locative is used in just a few cases --with the names of cities, towns, small islands, and the two nouns, domus (as described above) and rus....