Search found 54 matches

by quickly
Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:07 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Catullus 11 ("omnia haec" at l. 13)
Replies: 10
Views: 4037

Re: Catullus 11 ("omnia haec" at l. 13)

That's right: omnia haec (referring to the places visited) is the object of temptare, and parati refers to Furius and Aurelius, the addressees who are the subject of nuntiate. The object of nuntiate is pauca ... non bona dicta. The problem with your other analysis is that it would leave either temp...
by quickly
Thu Mar 11, 2010 3:34 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Catullus 11 ("omnia haec" at l. 13)
Replies: 10
Views: 4037

Catullus 11 ("omnia haec" at l. 13)

In carmina XI, Catullus writes: Furi et Aureli comites Catulli ... omnia haec, quaecumque feret voluntas caelitum, temptare simul parati, pauca nuntiate meae puellae non bona dicta. Now, is omnia haec to be construed the object of temptare , with the subject of the participle parati Furius and Aurel...
by quickly
Wed Mar 10, 2010 11:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Grinch Stole Xmas -- Difficult Level
Replies: 6
Views: 2569

Re: Grinch Stole Xmas -- Difficult Level

Lingua Latina is formatted such that the student won't require a glossary. The extent to which Orberg accomplished this can be questioned, but I found Familia Romana generally accessible with little recourse to a dictionary. If you worked through Familia Romana as intended, I doubt that the sequel ...
by quickly
Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:38 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: A few troubling words...
Replies: 6
Views: 3035

Re: A few troubling words...

Adrianus, thank you for your help. I am convinced by Damoetas, however, that my interests are better served by sending a letter in English. As he (or she) said, it could come off as "over earnest," and although I would like to think that previous letters sent to previous instructors in Latin had som...
by quickly
Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:32 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Dictionary noun descriptions
Replies: 12
Views: 3539

Re: Dictionary noun descriptions

I'm no Latin "expert," but I think you're referring to, e.g., the following: 1. copia, -ae , f.: "plenty, abundance" (sg.); "troops" (pl.) 2. littera, -ae , f.: "letter (of alphabet)"; "literature, epistle" (pl.) where the noun in the singular has a different meaning than the noun in the plural? For...
by quickly
Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:16 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: A few troubling words...
Replies: 6
Views: 3035

Re: A few troubling words...

Bretonus, There are no regularly offered Latin courses at my college. However, the school uses "Independent Learning Contracts" in order to allow students to pursue interests apart from regularly offered courses. The professor I usually contract for Latin is leaving for Greece and Italy with a group...
by quickly
Sun Mar 07, 2010 3:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: A few troubling words...
Replies: 6
Views: 3035

A few troubling words...

Hi, I am looking for possible ways to translate the following words or phrases: (1) quarter , as in "Spring quarter," "Fall quarter," or "two quarters." (2) course , as in "...took a Latin course at...". (3) sponsor and contract , as in "my sponsor for these contracts," or "would you sponsor these c...
by quickly
Fri Feb 19, 2010 9:22 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ars Amatoria Liber I lines 5-6 and 15-16
Replies: 6
Views: 2728

Re: Ars Amatoria Liber I lines 5-6 and 15-16

"which [hands] Hector would come to experience, he [the person mentioned earlier] offered [his] hands [as] ordered, the teacher having demanded, for slaps [i.e., he held out his hands to be slapped when the teacher demanded it, the same hands that would be laid on Hector] " Adrianus' explanation is...
by quickly
Thu Feb 18, 2010 8:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ars Amatoria Liber I lines 5-6 and 15-16
Replies: 6
Views: 2728

Ars Amatoria Liber I lines 5-6 and 15-16

Salve, I am having trouble with Ovid's Ars Amatoria lines 5-6 and 15-16. We just finished Wheelock's in class (over the course of 2.5-3 quarters), and are assigning ourselves "real Latin." So, for this week we chose Ars Amatoria Liber I 1-262 and Metamorphoses 1-252. The Metamorphoses is fine - perh...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What type of clause is this?
Replies: 9
Views: 3004

Re: What type of clause is this?

That makes sense: I am happy, having received your letter , that you...[x]. = ablative absolute usage, [x] was in the letter, but was not the cause of the happiness. I am happy, because I received your letter , and to hear [x] = cum-causal would have to include the contents of the letter. I am happy...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What type of clause is this?
Replies: 9
Views: 3004

Re: What type of clause is this?

futur o because the neuter would be the correct form, or because futurus, -i is a masculine noun? My dictionary doesn't list a nominal form, so I assume the ablative is neuter by default, then. Also: you wrote: "litteris tuis acceptis, quod...id mihi placet" Is there a reason to prefer the ablative...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What type of clause is this?
Replies: 9
Views: 3004

Re: What type of clause is this?

I think your second option is better: " litteras tuas acceptis, laetus sum quoniam ..." At least, I think it better approximates the sense of the original. 1. Laetus sum, cum litteras tuas acceperim, ut hanc rem futura suscipiam was intended to translate as: "I am glad, since I have received your le...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:59 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Re: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

No problem. I think you are correct, however (as always, it appears!). Are there any cases in which the different explanations might lead to misunderstanding, or do you think that the context is enough to clarify? I am under the impression that I was interpreting "circumstances" in a different way t...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:56 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: (Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III
Replies: 5
Views: 1968

Re: (Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III

Sorry for being so late. adrianus : as always, your answer is spectacular. I practically copied verbatim your notes next to the Martial piece: the poem is far clearer knowing the exact reference of these phrases. When I was reading, I assumed that the cedar-oil must have been a ritual practice of so...
by quickly
Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:49 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: What type of clause is this?
Replies: 9
Views: 3004

What type of clause is this?

I'm confused about the types of clauses which would express a statement like: "I am happy that I have received your letter." I can't use indirect discourse, because I would end up with something like: "I am happy because I received your letter" or "Since I have received your letter, I am happy," whi...
by quickly
Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:02 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Caesar for the Absolute Beginner
Replies: 2
Views: 1743

Caesar for the Absolute Beginner

As I am discovering, and as I am finishing the last Wheelock's chapters, merging translation - which is often slow going - with reading is the hardest task. Poetry becomes easier than prose, because your mind has been trained to approach Latin as a crossword puzzle ( 2 down: participle beginning wit...
by quickly
Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:37 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Words Pivot around
Replies: 4
Views: 1385

Re: Words Pivot around

The only thing that comes to mind here - and the entire post sounds odd - is Lakoff's model theory in cognitive linguistics.
by quickly
Sat Aug 29, 2009 12:36 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Wheelock Chapter 30
Replies: 4
Views: 5966

Re: Wheelock Chapter 30

Sorry, I meant to post this sooner. Here is what Wheelock's says on ( cog ) noscere : " [pp. 205] There are two common and quite logical exceptions to the rules for sequence of tenses: a historical present main verb (i.e., a present tense used for the vivid narration of past events) will often take ...
by quickly
Fri Aug 28, 2009 11:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: (Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III
Replies: 5
Views: 1968

Re: (Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III

Damoetes: I never doubted that Martial (or even this particular piece!) was fun; he is probably the most entertaining classical author I've read so far - and far more than Ceasar's infinitely tedious, but occasionally entertaining, de Bello Gallico , which reads in parts like somebody spliced an int...
by quickly
Fri Aug 28, 2009 12:42 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: (Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III
Replies: 5
Views: 1968

(Quite a few) Questions on Martial, Bk. III

I'm having some trouble with Martial III.2 (unfortunately, no the juicy Martial we know and love). Most of the problems start on line 5, and I'm sure they're easy to clear up. I realize the material is beyond my reading level, but I enjoy it anyways. 3.2 Cuius vis fieri, libelle, munus? festina tibi...
by quickly
Wed Aug 26, 2009 6:23 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: more questions from Lingua Latina.
Replies: 4
Views: 1465

Re: more questions from Lingua Latina.

My two cents: For 1., I would translate medico as dative: "...shows his tongue to the doctor ." I'm not sure when the ablative can indicate that an action can be done on the behalf of another person or thing; someone else will have to clear that up. For 2., it looks like you're dealing with an indir...
by quickly
Mon Aug 24, 2009 10:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Re: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

That makes sense. We understand both clause types in English by "when" - therefore, we understand both clauses as identical (we require supplemental information to differentiate the relations). As well, I assume the difference is minimal in Latin. Are you saying that the difference is non-consequent...
by quickly
Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Re: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

My apologies - I assumed the excerpted text was taken from an earlier edition of Wheelock's. The latest edition has all of the following relevant exposition: [pp. 211] Sometimes the verb in a cum clause is indicative, especially when describing the precise time of an action. In these so-called " cum...
by quickly
Mon Aug 24, 2009 7:00 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Re: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

What I mean to say is this: by simplifying their grammatical explanation, I think Wheelock's Ed. 6 has left room for error. Because the temporal clause designates the specific time at which the main verb occurs, and the circumstantial clause designates the conditions under which the action of the ma...
by quickly
Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:22 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Re: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

That's interesting. Looking at the link you provided, my only conclusion is that Wheelock's has simplified their grammatical explanations somewhat in Ed. 6. I understand what they are trying to say (especially after seeing the explanation from an older edition), but I believe that the sixth edition ...
by quickly
Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:19 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Lingua Latina
Replies: 4
Views: 2074

Re: Lingua Latina

My Wheelock's class is just now ending, and I've been looking at Lingua Latina for some time. After working through the first ten chapters, I feel that it has helped concretize much of the early grammar I learned - so that I am responding more quickly to the various cases and constructions. Apparent...
by quickly
Sat Aug 22, 2009 1:23 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses
Replies: 11
Views: 4288

Wheelock/M&F on circumstantial cum clauses

I noticed a discrepancy between Wheelock and M&F's description of indicative or subjunctive verb use in cum-circumstantial clauses. Wheelock's states that: [pp. 211] Very often...the verb of the cum clause is in the subjunctive mood, especially when it describes either the general circumstances (rat...
by quickly
Fri Aug 21, 2009 9:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: question regarding the preposition "in"
Replies: 8
Views: 2217

Re: question regarding the preposition "in"

A&G gives the following (supplementary) information, also, which I think helps clarify the motion towards use (slightly modified/supplemented): With the accusative , "into" (opposed to ex ) a. Of place: as in Italiam contendit , he hastens into Italy; as in casam currit , he rushes into his house. b...
by quickly
Thu Aug 20, 2009 7:29 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Wheelock Chapter 30
Replies: 4
Views: 5966

Re: Wheelock Chapter 30

We just finished chapter thirty in class (so I may be wrong), but I would translate as follows: PR2: videbit as 3rd. Sg. of videre; fuerit as 3rd. Sg. (subj.) of sum. According to the sequence of tenses, I would translate: "He will [shall] see how great the force of those felicitous words was ." PR8...
by quickly
Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:22 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")
Replies: 13
Views: 3509

Re: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")

adrianus: I tried to use the "gratias agere" construction, but all previous examples have included a dative pronoun, as in gratias tibi ago , so I was unsure of exactly how to use it in the context. I tried modeling that phrase off Catullus 49 ( gratias tibi maximas Catullus / agit pessimus omnium p...
by quickly
Thu Aug 20, 2009 9:59 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")
Replies: 13
Views: 3509

Re: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")

Okay - your explanation of "understanding" makes sense. Wheelock's had a brief discussion of substantively used participles, so I tried to model intellegens on the example of amans , which they translated as "one loving, hence lover " - which I realize now was a mistake (i.e., I believe it would mak...
by quickly
Wed Aug 19, 2009 3:54 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")
Replies: 13
Views: 3509

Re: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")

Other changes: for the "puto colegium" clause, I used the future infinitive of praebo. For "professor," I rendered it "doctor," approximating the position. Also: potes should have been poteris. ptolemny: thank you very much. I understand the majority of your suggestions, which have been extremely he...
by quickly
Tue Aug 18, 2009 2:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")
Replies: 13
Views: 3509

Re: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")

I think many of those were attempts to soften the letter, which backfired. I italicized trouble areas, but in general, I think it is readable. Most omissions were on my part; I assume Wheelock's was standard, and since I have only been taking Latin for 6 or 7 weeks, I tried to simplify the text. But...
by quickly
Mon Aug 17, 2009 9:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")
Replies: 13
Views: 3509

Letter in Latin (imp. subj. / expressing "would")

I am currently in the last two weeks of an intensive Latin summer course. We just started learning the subjunctive, and I am attempting to write a letter to the Latin teacher at my college (which I am not attending over the summer). It is, of course, grammatically simple. What is bothering me is the...
by quickly
Thu Aug 13, 2009 4:38 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "datas esse"
Replies: 9
Views: 3807

Re: "datas esse"

I am having trouble with your explanation. The Latin participle is a type of verbal which can be used substantively, adjectivally, or verbally. Because the participle is used in compound tenses , including the perfect passive, I don't think it functions as you say. So, because the perfect passive pa...
by quickly
Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: tollere: to life up, to destroy
Replies: 3
Views: 1558

Re: tollere: to life up, to destroy

"hopefully how you use it is thought provoking or funny...I think it's maybe self-serving." I think you are correct. Your comment is probably true due to the fact that I like the verb tollere (due to its perfect passive participle, having been imbued by Hegel through someLatin-educated translator), ...
by quickly
Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:52 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Purchasing books in Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 2683

Re: Purchasing books in Latin

I tried making a lulu file from google's scan of Ethica, which wasn't accepted due to the PDF having no embedded text. I would assume the best option would be to find a text version (perseus, etc.) and format a PDF as you like it.
by quickly
Tue Aug 11, 2009 12:51 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Death of Pompey
Replies: 3
Views: 1285

Re: Death of Pompey

I am not an expert, but I agree: Ab his[Agent-ABL] liberaliter ipse [Theme-NOM] appelatus [Perf. Pass.] naviculam parvulam [ACC obj. of conscendere] conscendit cum paucis amicis [Accomp. w/ consc...] I assume that because hic is ABL PL, its implies a MASC complement; because the only NOM object is i...
by quickly
Tue Aug 11, 2009 12:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: tollere: to life up, to destroy
Replies: 3
Views: 1558

tollere: to life up, to destroy

I can use a verb such as legere, etc. to describe the act of "reading" in two separate manners. Is it possible to do something similar with a verb such as tollere, e.g.: ad caelo (1st ACC) vocem meam sustuli aspectus perterrenti causa et, nulla exauditione audiente, (X) (2nd ACC) (virum, urbem, et c...
by quickly
Mon Aug 10, 2009 4:38 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Purchasing books in Latin
Replies: 7
Views: 2683

Re: Purchasing books in Latin

Thank you both. I think that, because my university doesn't have a copy of Ethica, and I can't get it on an interlibrary loan network, lulu.com looks like my best option. Unfortunately, there isn't an annotated edition available, which would be my preference. However, the sites listed by dlb look pr...