Search found 121 matches

by Twpsyn
Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:53 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: MEUS/MI Nominative/Vocative Rules
Replies: 20
Views: 6571

Re: MEUS/MI Nominative/Vocative Rules

O, MEA AMPULLA (nom.)(fem) O, MEUS GLADIUS (nom.)(masc) If you say O , then you generally are using the vocative, not the nominative. But those are the nominative forms, yes. O, MEA AMPULLA (voc.)(fem) O, MEUS GLADIUS (voc.)(masc) O, MI GLADIUS (voc.)(masc) The vocative singular of gladius would be...
by Twpsyn
Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:44 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Genitive gerund of esse?
Replies: 15
Views: 6634

Re: Genitive gerund of esse?

Civitate limitare (or finitionare < finitionaris, -is, -a < finitio, finitionis) historialiter fuit, ... That is not a good use of the ablative absolute. First of all, since the purpose of the construction is usually to get rid of an extra clause and its verb, having the word fuit is no good. I mys...
by Twpsyn
Tue Jun 30, 2009 4:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Lingua Latina Recordings?
Replies: 3
Views: 1570

Re: Lingua Latina Recordings?

On the version of the CD I have, he records almost all of the chapters ... he only leaves off half a dozen or so at the end, if memory serves.
by Twpsyn
Tue Jun 30, 2009 4:10 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: using two languages to learn A.G.
Replies: 7
Views: 2857

Re: using two languages to learn A.G.

Time spent translating the target language into an extra native language is time not spent looking at the target language. And since as a language learner your primary directive is to spend as much time as possible looking at, reading, understanding, and in general being surrounded by your target la...
by Twpsyn
Sun Oct 19, 2008 3:49 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Am i missing the point: Adj are always Adj
Replies: 2
Views: 1012

I have been observing your posts for some time, blutoonwithcarrotandnail, and I believe I have diagnosed your problem with Latin: you are thinking about it too much . Please, spare yourself the agony of grappling with these slippery grammar concepts, find yourself a copy of Lingua Latina or anything...
by Twpsyn
Mon Sep 29, 2008 1:06 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Plural of unus
Replies: 11
Views: 5058

Lewis and Short says:
voc. une, Plaut. ap. Prisc. p. 673 P.; Cat. 37, 17; cf. Varr. L. L. 8, § 63 Müll.; Aug. Conf. 1, 7
In other words, yes there is a vocative. It is both regularly formed and quite rare, so I am not surprised a basic textbook would omit it.
by Twpsyn
Sun Sep 28, 2008 11:17 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: New technology
Replies: 14
Views: 3816

I was given a mobile phone. I never use it, and it languishes, powerless and forgot, in a corner of my bedroom.
by Twpsyn
Sun Sep 28, 2008 11:15 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Dictionary Discrepancies
Replies: 4
Views: 1429

There is always overlap. You mustn't get pinned down by the particular English word one source or the other uses to define the Latin.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 20, 2008 6:37 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Reading matter page 222
Replies: 2
Views: 3920

Pharsalus is feminine.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:27 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Demonstratives
Replies: 12
Views: 2567

Perhaps they mean that there is no word that corresponds directly to English 'he, she, it'. The closest thing is, of course, using is , ea , id , as 'he, she it', but you can also use it as a demonstrative more or less equivalent to ille or hic . And sometimes those words themselves are used with li...
by Twpsyn
Wed Sep 17, 2008 4:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need a little LL love...
Replies: 7
Views: 3316

I would say their womanly fear has been overcome by their misfortunes. The implication being that now they are able to lob projectiles without swooning, &c. So it is ablative of cause or agent, taken with victo.
by Twpsyn
Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:50 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Best Textbook for Autodidact?
Replies: 12
Views: 5071

Get as many textbooks as you can and use them simultaneously.
by Twpsyn
Mon Sep 15, 2008 1:28 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Two sentences from Lingua Latina
Replies: 5
Views: 1769

Re: Two sentences from Lingua Latina

1. Feminae gemmis et margaritis anulisque ornantur. (Cap. VIII) Here "et" and "que" are combined. I think "gemmis et margaritis et anulis" must also be right, but is there any difference (in style etc.) between the two? Not really. The first one sounds better because et ... et ... et gets repetitiv...
by Twpsyn
Sun Sep 14, 2008 5:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Labialization of qu
Replies: 8
Views: 4727

You may be vastly exaggerating the mouth-shape (if your lips are like a pufferfish (!)), or something. In my experience, as I said, the two are extremely similar (after all, all it is is the difference of a fraction of a second between when you add the lip rounding). Another possibility is the diffe...
by Twpsyn
Sun Sep 14, 2008 3:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Labialization of qu
Replies: 8
Views: 4727

You could, I suppose, transcribe 'queen' as /kÊ·i:n/ (labialized k) or /kwi:n/ (k + w). I am unsure what difference you find between the two; they are almost indistinguishable, if, indeed, not identical.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Omission of IPSE vs SUI
Replies: 8
Views: 2723

The ipse adds emphasis but no 'meaning'.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:50 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The vocative of MEUS
Replies: 9
Views: 2954

You will dine well with me, my Fabullus.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:13 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Short translation for tattoo phrase
Replies: 5
Views: 2740

The other way around. I translated more or less word for word. So aude means 'dare', mori means 'to die', and vivere means 'to live'.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:58 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Short translation for tattoo phrase
Replies: 5
Views: 2740

No, I mean in the context of the sentence, is it a command form, instructing the reader to dare!, or could it be rendered ' to dare to live, to dare to die,' etc.? In the first case, the first line could be translated Aude mori; aude vivere . In the second case, it would be translated Audere mori, a...
by Twpsyn
Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:47 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Lingua Latina and what else?
Replies: 3
Views: 1320

Lingua Latina on its own teaches you grammar comprehensively and quickly (notice you are getting fairly traditional-style grammar explanations in the 'GRAMMATICA' sections, just under Latin names instead of English ones). If Lingua Latina is not a challenge for you, then that is good! It sounds like...
by Twpsyn
Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The vocative of MEUS
Replies: 9
Views: 2954

First line of Catullus 13:

Cenabis bene, mi Fabulle, apud me, ....
by Twpsyn
Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Short translation for tattoo phrase
Replies: 5
Views: 2740

Is 'dare' meant to be a command (which wants the imperative form) or just a vague idea (as in 'to dare to live', etc.)? But yes, your translation is not correct. The second line is correct, though I oftener see it spelled utrumque than utrunque ; the first line I or someone else can translate correc...
by Twpsyn
Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ANTE INTER and the accusative
Replies: 7
Views: 2736

blutoonwithcarrotandnail wrote:The cat is in the window (window is accus)
No, ablative, because in takes the ablative when it means 'in, inside'. It takes the accusative when it means 'into'.
by Twpsyn
Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ANTE INTER and the accusative
Replies: 7
Views: 2736

If you say 'in front of the window', then 'window' is accusative (in the Latin, of course). That seems to be the clearest way to explain it. A prepositional phrase is like a little 'packet' grammatically separate from the rest of the sentence: thus, whenever you say 'in front of the window', it is a...
by Twpsyn
Thu Sep 11, 2008 1:43 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Third Declension Nouns have natural gender
Replies: 6
Views: 2874

You are indeed missing the point. What case a noun happens to be or, if it happens to be in the genitive, the gender of the noun it qualifies, has nothing to do with its own gender, which (except in the case of nouns of common gender like bos) is a fixed property of that individual noun.
by Twpsyn
Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:21 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Third Declension Nouns have natural gender
Replies: 6
Views: 2874

No. Natural gender means that if a noun's meaning refers to a male 'something', then the noun is masculine, and if it refers to a female 'something', then the noun is feminine. However, not all third-declension nouns have natural gender, any more than other Latin nouns do. Sol 'sun' is masculine and...
by Twpsyn
Tue Sep 09, 2008 10:07 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Omnes domum cedite
Replies: 5
Views: 5881

It could also be the imperative cĕdo, 'give! show!' In which case the sentence would be: 'Give up all the houses!' Which is not very apt either.
by Twpsyn
Sat Sep 06, 2008 11:17 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How to use Lingua Latina
Replies: 32
Views: 23328

I imagine the spirit of the original poster's suggestion was to be reading some connected and unaltered Latin text, even before one is able to understand it fully without the English help, so as to be exposed to the rhythm and cadence of the period and the 'feel' of Latin idiom, & c.: a suggestion I...
by Twpsyn
Thu Sep 04, 2008 10:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation of "fortitudo iuvenum"
Replies: 9
Views: 2516

Difference betwen III declension and III-i declension is only in genitive plural ending. No, there are other differences: full i-stems have m/f plural nom-acc in Ä«s , singular acc in im , and singular abl in Ä« . Full i-stems with these endings are rare, but even mixed i-stems have neuter plural n...
by Twpsyn
Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:22 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: ex 447 question 3
Replies: 3
Views: 3768

Quo is regularly used to introduce clauses of purpose that contain a comparative (in this case facilius). You can think of it as 'he strengthened the friendship the faster to make war.'
by Twpsyn
Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneid Recitation
Replies: 8
Views: 4023

Re: Aeneid Recitation

yee0890 wrote:Also, is the technique used in this video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoD0vjQi ... re=related
one of the closest restored classical reading on the web?
I like it because of its rhythmic quality but I'm not sure if that's the 'right' way.
Yes.
by Twpsyn
Tue Sep 02, 2008 1:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: S-O-V
Replies: 6
Views: 2234

OK, so I just need more exposure to the language..... I knew that Latin word order was freer than other languages, but I have also been told that unusual word order was utilized to place emphasis on certain words. which I don't want to do. So I was anxious to get the standard word order down. But m...
by Twpsyn
Sun Aug 31, 2008 2:55 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Cassel's Latin Dictionary
Replies: 4
Views: 1589

It's sometimes too tempting to think of a language as a collection of grids and rules. Languages are steaming morasses of inconsistency, which is what (to my eyes) makes them so beautiful! Whatever 'throws you for a loop', take that and run with it and revel in it!
by Twpsyn
Sun Aug 31, 2008 2:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: How in the world do you pronounce this?
Replies: 8
Views: 3447

Re: How in the world do you pronounce this?

Especially his pronunciation of the nasal vowel in "-um" is way off, and as a result of that, the advice on how to pronounce short "u" is outright bizzare: "[o] as in [pʰʊt]: [tɔ̃], [sɔ̃]" It sounds like he says '[ʊ] as in [pʊt]' to me (but that first vowel is quite smudged), but his tum an...
by Twpsyn
Sat Aug 30, 2008 3:12 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: What's the interrogative for numerical order?
Replies: 7
Views: 2992

In English you can say 'which in order', though that sounds stilted. 'Which' works too, I guess. There is no word that fills the gap precisely. I don't know about Greek.
by Twpsyn
Sat Aug 30, 2008 3:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Cassel's Latin Dictionary
Replies: 4
Views: 1589

There are some verbs, however, whose third or fourth principal parts do not exist, either because the verb is not used in the passive or because they are simply unattested. If you're only on the first lesson of Wheelock's, you probably don't need to worry about that, but it is good to keep it in min...
by Twpsyn
Thu Aug 28, 2008 7:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Verb defendo question
Replies: 4
Views: 1466

If you don't know from the context, then it's ambiguous.
by Twpsyn
Wed Aug 27, 2008 6:19 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Ch. 9 - Help Remembering the Demonstratives
Replies: 4
Views: 4753

Get a reading course like Lingua Latina, which does an excellent job of gradually introducing pronouns from the start, and see the pronouns in use rather than in sterile example sentences. While I have nothing against Lingua Latina, I don't imagine that the best way to deal with the dawg's problem ...
by Twpsyn
Wed Aug 27, 2008 6:13 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Per circuitum
Replies: 11
Views: 3245

No. The third declension consonant-stem ablative singular is short e. Kasper's scansion is correct.
by Twpsyn
Tue Aug 26, 2008 7:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Lingua Latina, Familia Romana. p 11
Replies: 2
Views: 1319

Multi and pauci are in italics; the sentence is talking about the words Multi and pauci, referring to them as examples of vocabul_ Latin_. Think of them with quotation marks, if that makes more sense. Also cf. line 71 of the text.