Search found 99 matches

by vastor
Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

In a clear sense j IS i in latin. j may have been orthographically and even phonetically derived from consonantal i , but it was still an artificial construction in medieval latin; most likely coming from german use. The Romans used y in Greek words where earlier they had used u in them I was under...
by vastor
Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

Of course, the English j is just that: English. To, for example, a German student, the use of the letter j in Latin would in no way seem strange or dubious, since the German pronunciation of the letter is exactly as in Latin, a consonantical i . And therein lies the problem, the phonetics of j are ...
by vastor
Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

That's too much, vastor. Why would someone write "j" in latin because it was pronounced in English in a certain way? The letter is completely arbitrary. It may as well have been a z for all the good it does. At least vocalic v (u) has a case for its usage, because phonetically, it's similar to most...
by vastor
Thu Mar 18, 2010 1:04 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

ptolemyauletes wrote: Lastly, the Romans didn't use 'j', so why the hell would we?
The ironic thing is, it isn't even pronounced like an english j, so Its function is dubious.
by vastor
Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:12 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

I have to admit, I'm so used to reading without j that when I do encounter it, it stops me dead in my tracks. In an ideal world, I think both i and v should have been used to represent their respective consonantal and vocalic sounds, rather than the strange situation we have today where it's most of...
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question
Replies: 14
Views: 4661

Re: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question

That seems to make better sense now, thanks Damoetas.
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Progress and next step
Replies: 11
Views: 2654

Re: Progress and next step

Thanks for the explanations guys.
Gratias vobis, Adriano Damoetique ago.
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 6:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical latin alphabet.
Replies: 47
Views: 18592

Re: Classical latin alphabet.

I agree. It would be nice to see some consistency. We are expected to implicitly differentiate phonetically, consonantal i (j) from vocalic i , yet consonantal u (v) and vocalic u distinctions are explicitly denoted in texts. Personally I would prefer the puritanistic approach of single characters f...
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 6:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question
Replies: 14
Views: 4661

Re: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question

Qua re impetrata - This looks like the ablative absolute construction, where qua is an interrogative adjectival modifier of re , and the attendant circumstance appears to be temporal in nature: After what matter had been entreated, they who have been commanded to surrender (their) arms, do. Thanks ...
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 6:08 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question
Replies: 14
Views: 4661

Re: Loeb's Caesar The Gallic War question

"Qua re impetrata arma tradere iussi faciunt." An interesting sentence. I would break down the structure of it as follows: Qua re impetrata - This looks like the ablative absolute construction, where qua is an interrogative adjectival modifier of re , and the attendant circumstance appears to be te...
by vastor
Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Progress and next step
Replies: 11
Views: 2654

Re: Progress and next step

Eutropius is another traditional beginner text. I often see the prepositional phrase ab urbe condita in the writings of historians, and although the meaning is clear, the grammar eludes me, for isn't condita a participle, used here for a purpose which is surely better suited to a gerund/gerundive, ...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

Would you ever say in English though // Dicabisne unquam haec "The consuls proceeded by means of offensive army" (of means/ instrumentalis ) or "The consuls proceeded as an offensive force" (of manner/ modi ) rather than // ante hoc "The consuls proceeded with an offensive army" (of accompaniment /...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 6:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

I. 28.-"cum <omnibus> copiis: in military expressions, accompaniment. is commonly expressed by the ablative without a preposition". This is really inexcusable, for careful statements in regard to the usage have long been available. cum is always found with verbs of contention, with definite numbers...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 6:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

Consules exercitu infesto in agrum Sabinum profecti cum ita uastatione, dein proelio adflixissent opes hostium, ut diu nihil inde rebellionis timeri posset. After the consules had set out into the sabine field with (their) hostile army, and since having weakened the resources of the enemy thus by r...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:15 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

Where was the note on frequency, by the way? Ubi obiter erat commentarium de frequentatione? The classical weekly vol 9, no 6, pp 45-47. Review of books I and II of caesar's de bello gallico. There are 68 military expressions of accompaniment that have cum and six that do not. In all six the noun i...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 4:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student
Replies: 12
Views: 5775

Re: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student

Damoetas wrote: It's under "Miscellany > Dares the Phrygian" (for some reason it's not in the drop-down menu at the top).
Many thanks.
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 8:25 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student
Replies: 12
Views: 5775

Re: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student

Salve Damoetas, That trojan account sounds interesting, where is that one located? And i'm always on the lookout for simple latin texts with enjoyable stories ;) Unfortunately, many of the books at the latin library are too advanced for me, or the vocabulary is completely unknown. But i'll keep look...
by vastor
Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

I was just proposing it as a possibility. Maybe it's not correct, vastor. Id nihilo proposui secùs quàm possibile. Fortassè, vastor, falsum est. Livy II,9,4-5: Porsinna, cum regem esse Romae tum Etruscae gentis regem amplum Tuscis ratus, Romam infesto exercitu venit. You misunderstand me. I wasn't ...
by vastor
Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:29 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

ablative of accompaniment without cum for military matters (L&S 413a) From what I can discern from de bello gallico , use of the preposition is much more common even with military expressions. Which explains why I never encountered it. I did find an interesting note on its frequency though; It appe...
by vastor
Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:43 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: More questions from Romae Viri
Replies: 15
Views: 3579

Re: More questions from Romae Viri

In a story about Horatius Cocles: Porsena, rēx Etruscōrum, ad restituendōs in rēgnum Tarquiniōs īnfestō exercitū Rōmam vēnit. Porsena, the king of the Etruscans, to restore the Tarquins to power, came to Rome ... It can't be just with his aggressive army, or it would be cum īnfestō exercitū, wouldn...
by vastor
Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:10 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student
Replies: 12
Views: 5775

Re: Help with learning vocabulary and becoming a better student

I'm still a beginner myself, but I find that reading texts with a simplified grammar allows me to enjoy the stories and absorb the vocabulary rather than transverbalising/transliterating each sentence. I switch between these simple texts and more complex ones in order to retain knowledge of the adva...
by vastor
Sun Feb 21, 2010 12:28 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: LATINE DISCE: a web for learning Latin vocabulary
Replies: 5
Views: 1718

Re: LVDVS: a web for learning Latin vocabulary

Looks wonderful cattus. I'm writing a program in ncurses along similar lines to help me practise vocabulary, paradigms, and idioms from latin for beginners. And this will no doubt aid me greatly. Many thanks for your hard work.
by vastor
Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:28 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: LXX. THE RIVAL CENTURIONS
Replies: 2
Views: 3485

Re: LXX. THE RIVAL CENTURIONS

Thank you bedwere, that makes perfect sense now. For some reason I had convinced myself that eius was a possessive adjective, however now that I see your translation, it's clear it can only be a personal pronoun.
by vastor
Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:53 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: LXX. THE RIVAL CENTURIONS
Replies: 2
Views: 3485

LXX. THE RIVAL CENTURIONS

Salvete omnes, I'm trying to translate this latin: Hic casus vaginam avertit et dextram manus eius gladium educere conatis moratur. I translated the first sentence as: That accident/calamity disturbed the (his Sword's?) sheath/scabbard. Then we come to the second with its unspecified subject which I...
by vastor
Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The importance of audio
Replies: 29
Views: 14169

Re: The importance of audio

I for one find latinum an indispensable tool for my autodidactic studies. Thank you evan.
by vastor
Thu Oct 29, 2009 5:02 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Leading a Latin group
Replies: 14
Views: 3730

Re: Leading a Latin group

I'd be interested in a learning group, however I don't own nor have I read wheelock. Perhaps choosing a course that is freely available would prove more popular?
by vastor
Sat Oct 24, 2009 12:53 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Just checking on Prep
Replies: 21
Views: 6866

Re: Just checking on Prep

Sorry, but it's not clear to me what you mean by "that was just a general grammar" or what the connection of the examples is. Me paenitet, non clarum est quod significat "modò grammatica generalis erat" vel cur talia exempla pares. I will attempt to elaborate. The the dative relation, and the infin...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 4:16 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Very short translation
Replies: 18
Views: 4841

Re: Very short translation

Certainly "hostis" should be singular for "an enemy". See L&S and OLD. Secundum L&S et OLD dictionaria, certè "hostis" singulariter inimicus significat vel denotat. Salve adrianum, L&S notes no difference between the singular and plural as far as I can see. But most other dictionaries carefully not...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 3:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Just checking on Prep
Replies: 21
Views: 6866

Re: Just checking on Prep

I love to use ... amo uti Unless I'm mistaken, you don't say "amo uti". Using an infinitive like a noun in the accusative is rare in Latin (A&S §453) and "amo" is not a verb that takes a complementary infinitive (A&S 456-458). Rather, you have to say "id uti mihi in studio est", "id uti mihi amicum...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 8:32 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Just checking on Prep
Replies: 21
Views: 6866

Re: Just checking on Prep

I just realised you might be trying to employ a complementary infinitive. however the actual sentence would look like this: I like to use 'I' is the subject 'To' is the preposition 'Use' is the verb Correct? If that is what you are trying to do then, I like (latin: amo ) is the main verb, to use (la...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 7:29 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Just checking on Prep
Replies: 21
Views: 6866

Re: Just checking on Prep

Salvete blutoonwithcarrotandnail Adriumque, 'Like' + Dat (Like is a word in Roman which uses Dat) (an example in Roman with a different verb: locus idoneus templo) That's correct, but it's not a verb , it's an adjective. There are certain latin adjectives that are accompanied by a noun in the dative...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 4:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Very short translation
Replies: 18
Views: 4841

Re: Very short translation

Thank you for your reply. Salve TheProphet, You're welcome. Could someone please give me each of the translations for the above so i can work out which would be the most appropraite? I can try, although you have to bear in mind that each person can translate things slightly differently. These are m...
by vastor
Fri Oct 23, 2009 3:38 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Very short translation
Replies: 18
Views: 4841

Re: Very short translation

Salve ptolemyauletes, Vastor, Not sure why you use hostes pessimi. These are plurals. In my dictionary it states that the plural of hostis means the enemy , and the singular means enemy of the state . This is why I used the plural. I think 'inimicus' is the best adjective to use. A hostis is more of...
by vastor
Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Very short translation
Replies: 18
Views: 4841

Re: Very short translation

I would probably go with something that's not likely to be mistranslated. That is, something simpler. mei hostes pessimi sum. Or perhaps something less literal: omnium virorum hostes pessimi mei sum. Of all men, I am the worst enemy of myself. I don't think it's necessary to include an intensive pro...
by vastor
Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: latinum
Replies: 1
Views: 870

Re: latinum

It seems to be ok for me. Perhaps it's a dns routing problem. This often affects regions differently.
by vastor
Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:01 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Pensum 382.
Replies: 3
Views: 4050

Re: Pensum 382.

the dictionary entry for "impero" there are a number of attested constructions. I suppose having legio in the nominative makes sense if it's the subject of the substantive clause of purpose. Thanks. This has confused me in the past as well. The thing is that Latin is much stricter about the relativ...
by vastor
Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:47 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Pensum 382.
Replies: 3
Views: 4050

Re: Pensum 382.

I seem to be having more problems with the same exercise. This time regarding the english to latin translation: Cæsar, when he heard the rumor (the rumor having been heard), commanded (imperâre) the legions to advance more quickly. Now, my first thought was the ablative absolute because of the hinti...
by vastor
Sun Oct 18, 2009 12:04 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Pensum 382.
Replies: 3
Views: 4050

Pensum 382.

Salvete omnes, I'm not sure if the following translation is correct: Labôribus cônfectîs, mîlitês â Caesare quaerêbant ut sibi praemia daret. With the labours completed / When-after(attendant circumstance of time) the labours were completed, the soldiers were seeking from caesar to get prizes/reward...
by vastor
Tue Feb 03, 2009 1:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: adaptive software question
Replies: 13
Views: 1867

Re: adaptive software question

Damascena,

Here is the html version I use (I made a shortened url in case you wish to copy the link):
http://tinyurl.com/b9mlpc

You can save the link in your browser's bookmarks, or save the file to disk and open later with a browser.
by vastor
Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:31 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: adaptive software question
Replies: 13
Views: 1867

Re: adaptive software question

I use the html version from the gutenberg site. It's much nicer reading it in a browser. In addition, I want to endorse the latinum podcast site which is excellent for all who desire to hear spoken latin.