Search found 278 matches

by Alatius
Sun Apr 07, 2019 12:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Stress in denique
Replies: 3
Views: 600

Re: Stress in denique

Yes, stress on the first syllable, but I also want to add that the finale e is short: dēnĭquĕ. Lewis & Short erroneously mark it and many other instances of final -ĕ as long: cf. https://www.jstor.org/stable/641434
by Alatius
Mon Dec 18, 2017 4:43 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: New edition of Ad Alpes: a Tale of Roman Life
Replies: 1
Views: 1310

New edition of Ad Alpes: a Tale of Roman Life

I'm crossposting this advert for a book I have helped publish, I hope you don't mind? In cooperation with my friend Daniel Pettersson, the founder of http://latinitium.com, I have prepared a new edition of a quite interesting text book, Ad Alpes: a Tale of Roman Life by H. C. Nutting. A lot of thing...
by Alatius
Mon Dec 18, 2017 4:30 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Fully digitized version of Smith & Hall
Replies: 2
Views: 1892

Re: Fully digitized version of Smith & Hall

Congratulations! Are you planning to do also A copious phraseological English-Greek lexicon ? Aha, interesting! It is not my first priority, mainly because my Greek is very poor, so I wouldn't get much use out of it personally. But the very clear typesetting and the very high quality of the scan th...
by Alatius
Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:00 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Dictionary of Latin synonyms?
Replies: 5
Views: 5428

Re: Dictionary of Latin synonyms?

Here is a pretty exhaustive compilation of books on Latin synonyms, with short extracts from each. The list includes those already mentioned here, as well as some other gems: https://www.latinitium.com/blog/latinsynonyms The work by Ogelvie, for example, is pretty interesting, especially if you are ...
by Alatius
Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:26 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: what does eī refer to? orberg text
Replies: 7
Views: 2897

Re: what does eī refer to? orberg text

Hm, if we should label this usage of the dative, I would definitely go with dative of reference . Dative of possession refers to constructions such as "mihi est frater", but that is not what we are dealing with here. But, in any case, whatever we call it, to understand the usage here I would concent...
by Alatius
Thu Oct 12, 2017 12:35 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Fully digitized version of Smith & Hall
Replies: 2
Views: 1892

Fully digitized version of Smith & Hall

Most of you are probably familiar with the great English-Latin dictionary of Smith & Hall. I am happy to be able to announce to you that there is now a fully digitized version of it available at https://www.latinitium.com/smithhall As you will see, the text, which was proofread by yours truly, has b...
by Alatius
Sun Feb 07, 2016 9:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Online: Plato's Apology of Socrates in Latin
Replies: 3
Views: 2122

Re: Online: Plato's Apology of Socrates in Latin

That's great, thank you! I really like the preservation efforts you undertake.

Some years ago I transcribed another translation, by Marsilio Ficino, which I put on Wikisource. It might be interesting to compare the two versions.
by Alatius
Sat Feb 06, 2016 1:07 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Source code of Whitaker's WORDS
Replies: 4
Views: 2163

Re: Source code of Whitaker's WORDS

There has been some efforts done to clean up the code and develop the program further. Check out http://mk270.github.io/whitakers-words/
There hasn't been much activity the last couple of months, though, but it is a promising initiative.
by Alatius
Thu Jun 25, 2015 7:32 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Yet another Macronizer
Replies: 4
Views: 3503

Yet another Macronizer

I invite everyone to test my latest creation, a new Latin Macronizer: http://stp.lingfil.uu.se/~jowi4905/macronizer/ Apart from marking long vowels, it also has the ability to convert the orthography to use v and/or j, if so desired. This project was at least partly inspired by Felipe Vogel's Māccer...
by Alatius
Sat Mar 14, 2015 2:32 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: rettuli vs. retuli
Replies: 3
Views: 1891

Re: rettuli vs. retuli

I don't think we have to explain it with "red-". Rather, as I once got it explained to me, the perfect stem was originally duplicated: tetuli (cf. cecini, pepigi, etc.). The first syllable is completely lost in the plain verb (fero tuli), but a vestige remains in rettuli.
by Alatius
Mon Jun 02, 2014 5:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Rebus divinis rite factis
Replies: 9
Views: 3651

Re: Rebus divinis rite factis

May I ask, what kind of abbreviation system are you using? Some I can deduce the meaning of (pi = presens infinitive; pf3p = perfect 3rd person particip), but I am at a loss to explain what you mean with fabp, mas, fns, and nap.
by Alatius
Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Poll: Long and short syllables
Replies: 23
Views: 10841

Re: Poll: Long and short syllables

I haven't answered the poll yet, because I think it is unclear what you are asking. Do you wonder if we try to make a lengthwise distinction at all, or wether we try to time it so that the long syllables are exactly twice the length of the short?
by Alatius
Tue Dec 24, 2013 9:40 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: LLPSI Familia Romana - alternative AUDIO recordings
Replies: 14
Views: 13728

Re: LLPSI Familia Romana - alternative AUDIO recordings

Most of it is really good! There were just a couple of things I thought of when I listened to it, which I might as well mention: Have you considered reducing final -m to nasalization of the preceding vowel? To my ears at least, it sounds as if you say "Assia", with a long s. K (/ka:/) is not the thi...
by Alatius
Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: compitum
Replies: 6
Views: 3040

Re: compitum

According to Oxford Latin Dictionary, "compitum" is from "competō", which seems reasonable: a crossroad is called "compitum" because there the roads come together ("competunt").
by Alatius
Sat Jul 27, 2013 5:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: is, ea, id
Replies: 11
Views: 7153

Re: is, ea, id

I actually have to worry about it because I am working on some instructional materials. Uhuh. Well, I'm only speaking from my own perspective, but personally I would prefer consistently disyllabic forms, as beeing clearer, especially if that is how they are written. If I go with D'ooge on ii, shoul...
by Alatius
Sat Jul 27, 2013 4:12 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: is, ea, id
Replies: 11
Views: 7153

Re: is, ea, id

Sure, "ii" and "iis" can certainly be contracted into one syllable, and can indeed also be written with only one "i". But I think the question whether you always should pronounce it that way is not as straightforward to answer as D'ooge makes it seem. No one could rightly hold it against you if you ...
by Alatius
Sat Jul 27, 2013 2:35 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: is, ea, id
Replies: 11
Views: 7153

Re: is, ea, id

Even though for example "ei" can be a dipthong in Latin, it is usually not the case in this pronoun. Except for "is, id, eorum, earum", all forms are disyllabic: is e-a id ei-us ei-us ei-us e-i e-i e-i e-um e-am id e-o e-a e-o e-i (i-i) e-ae e-a e-o-rum e-a-rum e-o-rum e-is (i-is) e-is (i-is) e-is (...
by Alatius
Sat Jul 13, 2013 1:26 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Trouble scanning a line in Plautus
Replies: 2
Views: 1867

Re: Trouble scanning a line in Plautus

Hm, does this work?

quīn in e|āps(e) ae|de Dī|ānā|ī con|ditum (e)st
L S S | L L | S L | L L | L L | S L

Lewis & Short note that the i in Diana sometimes is scanned long.
by Alatius
Sun Jun 02, 2013 8:53 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Pronouncing letters in acronyms
Replies: 4
Views: 2104

Re: Pronouncing letters in acronyms

Oh, that was just a silly mistake. I have edited my original post. The principle behind the way the letter names are formed is very simple: for vowels, the name of the letter is simply the (long) vowel itself. For consonants, if it is possible to extend the basic sound of the letter (as is the case ...
by Alatius
Fri May 31, 2013 10:14 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Pronouncing letters in acronyms
Replies: 4
Views: 2104

Re: Pronouncing letters in acronyms

The Latin alphabet is:
a be ce de e ef ge ha i ca el em en o pe cu er es te u ex ypsilon zeta
The last two are Greek in origin, and so have their Greek names. If you want to distinguish between I and J, and U and V, you can call them "i/u vocalis/consonans".
by Alatius
Fri Apr 19, 2013 7:35 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Should I Learn Ancient Greek or Latin?
Replies: 7
Views: 26239

Re: Should I Learn Ancient Greek or Latin?

However, it doesn't explain why, in the other example, they pronounce the ē like 'f i t' – I think a professor in classical studies should know his Latin. Chris Francese generally knows what he is doing. (Though, of course, you shouldn't take his pronunciation as an absolute model; as with most spe...
by Alatius
Sun Mar 17, 2013 1:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Cur dextras iungere non licet ac vere colloqui?
Replies: 6
Views: 2756

Re: Cur dextras iungere non licet ac vere colloqui?

Minime; dextra est dextra manus. (Jam hoc verbum in alio capitulo legisti, nonne?)
by Alatius
Sun Mar 17, 2013 12:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Quid toties filium falsis eludis imaginibus?
Replies: 2
Views: 1473

Re: Quid toties filium falsis eludis imaginibus?

Quid can be used as a very generic interrogative pronoun: not only "what", but also "how" and, in this case, "why".
by Alatius
Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Past participles and ambiguity
Replies: 16
Views: 10089

Re: Past participles and ambiguity

Unless Adrianus, or some other list participant who knows way more Latin than myself, make me blush by pointing out some obvious fact that I'm ignoring, it looks to me that talking about perfect or past passive participle when referring to expressions such as the ones we are discussing (e.g 'captus...
by Alatius
Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Confounding use of genitive
Replies: 3
Views: 1705

Re: Confounding use of genitive

Porro si mendacium est enuntiatio falsum enuntiare volentis ut fallat. ... Or is there an implied PERSON WHO IS WILLING? This is how it is translated. Yeah, participles are often treated as if they were nouns: volens = someone who wants falsum enuntiare volens ut fallat = someone/the one who wants ...
by Alatius
Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:10 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Confounding use of genitive
Replies: 3
Views: 1705

Re: Confounding use of genitive

3) Is "dicentis" actually modified by "genus" from the preceding clause? That fits the translation best of all, perhaps. I don't know, my brain has frozen. But can a word from one clause modify a word from a subsequent clause without a relative pronoun? I think this is the correct explanation. Ther...
by Alatius
Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:00 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin: Hobbitus Ille
Replies: 48
Views: 53579

Re: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin: Hobbitus Ille

"... when large stupid folk like you and me come blundering along ..." "... quandoquidem talis ingens et stulta gens qualis tu et ego rustice errat ..." (p. xvi) I got the impression that that is not a good use of "quandoquidem". Yes, there is no question about that. I would think that the most lik...
by Alatius
Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:35 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Quam ob causam quis... ( Marcus Aurelius )
Replies: 3
Views: 2316

Re: Quam ob causam quis... ( Marcus Aurelius )

"Quam ob causam" is "for what reason" (i.e. "why?"). (You might have expected "ob quam causam", but the original word order is more elegant; in fact, it is more or less a fixed phrase.) "Quis" is short for "aliquis". "Suspectam" is not a gerund, nor a gerundive, but a perfect participle. It agrees i...
by Alatius
Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:27 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: it remains that..., it is left that...
Replies: 3
Views: 2292

Re: it remains that..., it is left that...

I suspect a misreading/misprint/OCR-error. Does "testantur" fit in the context? Edit: Is this the text you are reading from? http://www.aussagenlogik.org/iamblichus-de-mysteriis-aegyptiorum/ I managed to find the relevant part in Google books by searching for the first words in the sentence followin...
by Alatius
Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Tacitus: subjunctive in indirect speech
Replies: 16
Views: 6705

Re: Tacitus: subjunctive in indirect speech

through your responses I imagine you're all implying those are participles and not complemented by ('esse') to form verbs, as I said. For what it is worth (perhaps not much) I am more inclined to see it as you did, with a non-existing but understood 'esse'. I think that the fact that the naves in M...
by Alatius
Sun Jan 20, 2013 7:59 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Tacitus: subjunctive in indirect speech
Replies: 16
Views: 6705

Re: Tacitus: subjunctive in indirect speech

I suppose it might be possible to understand it both ways. In any case, I see no reason to dismiss it as _not_ being indirect speech; as we know, Tacitus is very fond of not putting out forms of "esse" when it is understood from the context. This, for example, is from Annales 2.12.1: "Caesar transgr...
by Alatius
Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:54 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneid recorded in Latin
Replies: 4
Views: 2885

Re: Aeneid recorded in Latin

Wow, impressive bass voice! I have listened to the first book, and while there are some minor mistakes, the metrical rendition as a whole is sound. In fact it is very well done, considering that you can clearly hear from the enjambment and the way he connects phrases that he understand well what he ...
by Alatius
Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Habetne famulus tuus unas scopas?
Replies: 2
Views: 1499

Re: Habetne famulus tuus unas scopas?

Yep, it is correct: when you want to count a single instance of a plurale tantum noun, you use "uni, unae, una", in the plural. Cicero for example repeatedly writes about "unae litterae", and so on. But if you have more than one letter, it seems that the usual thing to do is to use the distributive ...
by Alatius
Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:51 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: 2013 Site Changes and Improvements
Replies: 3
Views: 1975

Re: 2013 Site Changes and Improvements

Great news! Magnas gratias tibi ago! :D
by Alatius
Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:31 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Nec vero talia passus est Ulixes
Replies: 2
Views: 1747

Re: Nec vero talia passus est Ulixes

It is a deponent verb, so the sense is active even if the form is passive. Thus, "passus est" means "he allowed" (not "he was allowed"), just as "locutus est" means "he said" (not "he was said"). Clearly, Ulysses was not going to stand idly by watching his crew being masacred.
by Alatius
Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: victo tandem terrore etc...
Replies: 7
Views: 3194

Re: victo tandem terrore etc...

"... Anchises gave his own right hand in swift and generous aid, and by prompt token cheered the exile's heart, who, banishing his fears, poured forth this tale:" (Translated by Theodore C. Williams) "The good Anchises rais'd him with his hand; Who, thus encourag'd, answer'd our demand:" (Translated...
by Alatius
Fri Dec 28, 2012 3:21 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: is this a mistake?
Replies: 2
Views: 1407

Re: is this a mistake?

Perhaps he wants to make a distinction between an individual "cyclop" and the name of the people (or species if you want), namely "the cyclops". That's the only explanation I can think of.
by Alatius
Fri Dec 28, 2012 3:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Aeneas, cum a viro ipso certior fieri cuperet
Replies: 4
Views: 2891

Re: Aeneas, cum a viro ipso certior fieri cuperet

Surely it does mean "go to / towards a place"; except for that, I agree with Carolus Raeticus: "Since Aeneas wanted to hear it from Helenus himself, he set forth towards the city (after having left the fleet in the harbour)."
by Alatius
Fri Dec 28, 2012 3:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: victo tandem terrore etc...
Replies: 7
Views: 3194

Re: victo tandem terrore etc...

I beg to differ on both accounts: "victo tandem terrore" = "fear finally having been conquered". (To have "victo" in an ablative absolute referring to the subject is very inelegant; in that case it ought to be rewritten as "victus".) Why was fear conquered? Because of Anchises's friendly gesture of ...
by Alatius
Thu Dec 27, 2012 12:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Quae postquam Helenus...
Replies: 6
Views: 2785

Re: Quae postquam Helenus...

Perhaps I'm pointing out the obvious, but in case you overlooked it: "quae" is the object to the deponent verb "fatus est". So "After Helenus had said that..."