Search found 148 matches

by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jul 14, 2012 8:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero
Replies: 36
Views: 11209

Re: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero

I can't perform delicate search operations from my phone, but I can refer you to Wikipedia. Find angle brackets in the usage section, where it discusses the mathematical and linguistic uses of the punctuation, and specifically addresses the issue of replacing them with inequality symbols.
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jul 14, 2012 2:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero
Replies: 36
Views: 11209

Re: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero

Closing quotes have always been inverted commas as have apostrophes, but chevrons are not and never have been inequality symbols. They are represented by them in computing for convenience, but not, as you say, in traditional typography. What you are arguing is if these two glyphs are unique, then al...
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri Jul 13, 2012 8:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero
Replies: 36
Views: 11209

Re: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero

What do you mean, exactly? Apostrophes and closing single quotes are identical in form and digital real estate, whereas chevrons and greater than symbols are not. If there were two torrent Unicode designations for the apostrophe and single double quote, they would probably be used accordingly as a m...
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero
Replies: 36
Views: 11209

Re: acc. as subject of substantivated inf? Cicero

By this principle taken as universal, one should ideally use a symbol for the apostrophe which were different from that for the closing single quotation mark. When the symbols differ, professional typesetters prefer to use the proper symbols. A professional publishing company would not print someth...
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jul 03, 2012 12:31 pm
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Pronunciation of words
Replies: 18
Views: 24514

Re: Pronunciation of words

Also, -gn- is pronounced like the -ngn- in "hangnail" "eius" as "ejjus" It is worth noting that Anthony isn't listing eius as an exceptional case - all intervocalic consonantal I s are doubled: huius is huijus , peior is peijor , and so on. The most significant consequence of this is that all syllab...
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jul 02, 2012 12:42 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: abs. abl. in Cicero
Replies: 3
Views: 2444

Re: abs. abl. in Cicero

Not habetis (a verb) but habitis (a participle). "With all other things considered to be of no value".
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jul 02, 2012 12:37 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Search has been disabled?
Replies: 23
Views: 11386

Re: Search has been disabled?

Adelheid wrote:I have been away for a month, so missed that repair of the forum. What was that about?
For several days, threads were not viewable - there was an SQL error of some sort.
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:09 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: figura?
Replies: 5
Views: 1989

Re: figura?

This: I’m wondering whether the phrase . . . involves some kind of rhetorical figure of speech. Begging the question, like many logical fallacies, is an effective rhetorical device when not caught. Otherwise, I do not understand the question. This "he" mentioned is reasoning from a baseless assumpti...
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: figura?
Replies: 5
Views: 1989

Re: figura?

"To beg the question" has a very different meaning in debates than in common parlance. It refers to a logical fallacy when used correctly. See here: http://begthequestion.info/
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor
Replies: 4
Views: 2563

Re: Titanic - Pervivet Pro Te Hoc Cor

I noticed that the song routinely pronounces the word "sapio" = "I know" as two syllables "sapjo". This pronunciation seems to have been routine in spoken Late Latin (as shown by its outcomes in the derivative Romance languages); but it does not show in Latin hexameter verse. It's not entirely with...
by Sceptra Tenens
Wed Jun 27, 2012 3:17 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Search has been disabled?
Replies: 23
Views: 11386

Search has been disabled?

Since the forum has been repaired, all search functions have disappeared. Is this intentional?
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ant. rectus
Replies: 3
Views: 1521

Re: ant. rectus

He is asking for the antonym of rectus. There isn't one word that stands as an antonym to all of its senses. When it means "straight" or "nominative", the opposite would be obliquus. When it means "good", it would be improbus. When it means "correct", it would be falsus.
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jun 26, 2012 10:42 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Autotranslaters
Replies: 7
Views: 3841

Re: Autotranslaters

Google Translate is dubious even with modern languages. It can come close, but there are almost always mistakes.
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jun 19, 2012 9:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: captum iri vel capturus esse?
Replies: 8
Views: 3297

Re: captum iri vel capturus esse?

bedwere wrote:Puto fures a me captos iri
Num fas est "captos iri" dicere? Doctus sum infinitivum futurum passivum fuisse supinum cum iri.
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: captum iri vel capturus esse?
Replies: 8
Views: 3297

Re: captum iri vel capturus esse?

"captum iri" passivum est, sed "capturus esse" activum.
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jun 18, 2012 6:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27001

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Pardon my typo - "mortuus sit" is the perfect, not "mortuus fit". I still hesitate before producing the active pluperfect and future perfect tenses, myself.
by Sceptra Tenens
Sun Jun 17, 2012 2:03 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27001

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

Moreretur is fine, but not mortuus fuerit. But, the perfect subjunctive, mortuus sit, is also fine - Adler would say that it referred to something that recently happened. "He has (just recently) been so hurt that he has died".

Edit - changed "fit" to "sit"
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jun 16, 2012 2:26 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Subject and Predicate: telling apart
Replies: 4
Views: 3298

Re: Subject and Predicate: telling apart

It might help to say that iracundum esse is the subject, not just esse. They convey a single unified idea, just like homo iracundus. But, the difference between subject and predicate in sentences like this isn't very significant.
by Sceptra Tenens
Thu Jun 14, 2012 11:09 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Rendering into Greek
Replies: 5
Views: 2518

Re: Rendering into Greek

Aha, got it. Thank you.
by Sceptra Tenens
Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:31 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Rendering into Greek
Replies: 5
Views: 2518

Re: Rendering into Greek

That sounds good to me, but maybe you can change the dual to singular without preposition, as in the beginning of the Anabasis by Xenophon: Δαρείου καὶ Παρυσάτιδος γίγνονται παῖδες δύο... I'm not sure what you are saying - the only dual I see is δυοῖν, which should maybe be plural instead, but it d...
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue Jun 12, 2012 11:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help scanning a hexameter
Replies: 5
Views: 2550

Re: Help scanning a hexameter

No, elision is a feature of the language that is capitalized on in poetry to force meters to work. If a line had to scan even without elision, then Vergil would have to have been drunk when he wrote litora multum ille et terris iactatus et alto.
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help scanning a hexameter
Replies: 5
Views: 2550

Re: Help scanning a hexameter

It would have scanned even it were neo; the O would have been elided like this:

Ver-gi-li / um vī / dī tan / tum ne'a / mā-ra Ti- / bul-lō
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:51 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: di-vido
Replies: 2
Views: 1391

Re: di-vido

No, di- simply gives the notion of separation, as in diripio, differo, dilacero, dilabor , which are "I loot, I scatter, I tear to shreds, I fall apart" respectively. It is clearly shown that this word has no notion of two in Caesar's De Bello Gallico 1.1.1: Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres , ...
by Sceptra Tenens
Mon Jun 11, 2012 2:16 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin terms for weather, geography, plants, etc.
Replies: 4
Views: 2916

Re: Latin terms for weather, geography, plants, etc.

You're very welcome! The Internet has a wealth of these resources, but many of them are well hidden.
by Sceptra Tenens
Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:48 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: the word possum
Replies: 1
Views: 4190

Re: the word possum

The differences between poteram and potui will be much the same as those between eram and fui , so far as temporal aspect goes. For more particular differences, here are a couple of examples: Relinquebatur una per Sequanos via, qua Sequanis invitis propter angustias ire non poterant. "There was left...
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jun 09, 2012 5:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin terms for weather, geography, plants, etc.
Replies: 4
Views: 2916

Re: Latin terms for weather, geography, plants, etc.

One Mr. Ripman has created a topical dictionary that, I think, should suit your needs to some degree. Click the second-to-last link in this page.
by Sceptra Tenens
Wed Jun 06, 2012 9:35 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: word order
Replies: 2
Views: 5270

Re: word order

Probably right before the verb, by the conventional belief in a proper word order. But, I disagree with the idea - there is no "unusual emphasis" in "Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres", and yet the verb is the second word. Then, look to the next sentence, "quarum unum incolunt Belgae". That isn...
by Sceptra Tenens
Sun Jun 03, 2012 4:53 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Setting up the Vulgate
Replies: 4
Views: 2331

Re: Setting up the Vulgate

If you have an iPhone or iPod Touch, download "Holy Bible" by Paul Avery. It allows you to view English on once side, and Latin on the other (after you have downloaded the Vulgate via the app, of course).
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat Jun 02, 2012 5:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "To his death in 1675"
Replies: 14
Views: 5095

Re: "To his death in 1675"

It may be worth noting that this ambiguity actually exists in the English, even in this very phrase. "He ruled from 1665 until his death in 1675." This could theoretically be taken to mean "In 1675, he ruled from 1665 until his death". Practically, though, this could only be an issue for the least s...
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "To his death in 1675"
Replies: 14
Views: 5095

Re: "To his death in 1675"

I thought that an ablative (anno 1675) could not be used to modify a noun (mortem). hi adrian, can you please explain why you believe that the ANNO ablative phrase of time in the formulation in your post unambiguously modifies the noun MORTEM and not the verb? i would naturally take the ablative ph...
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat May 26, 2012 1:49 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin to be published 13 Sep 2012
Replies: 4
Views: 3972

Re: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin to be published 13 Sep 2

If it helps, I still might give it a go. I am just irritated by the title :p
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri May 25, 2012 11:08 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Small translation help needed
Replies: 6
Views: 2546

Re: Small translation help needed

Here's a tip - filii is nominative.
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri May 25, 2012 1:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Small translation help needed
Replies: 6
Views: 2546

Re: Small translation help needed

Castra sunt in agro and boni sunt filii amicorum are two very different cases. For the castra one: Castrae does not exist. The singular form of castra is castrum , but then it doesn't mean "camp" anymore. There are plenty of times when sunt should be translated as "is", and when "are" should be tra...
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri May 25, 2012 12:52 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin to be published 13 Sep 2012
Replies: 4
Views: 3972

Re: Tolkien's "The Hobbit" in Latin to be published 13 Sep 2

It irritates me to no end to see "the" so needlessly translated - first "Winnie ille Pu", now "Hobbitus Ille". Sure, the translation of the article may have some place somewhere, but surely not here. It sounds even less Latin than Winnie, Pu and Hobbitus in this context. If they were so determined t...
by Sceptra Tenens
Thu May 24, 2012 11:22 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: heelock workbook caput 29
Replies: 1
Views: 3561

Re: heelock workbook caput 29

Not really. Wheelock just put the infinitive nearer to the accusative that it governs.

Don't get too hung up on word order. Trying to find explanations for everything that doesn't follow the textbook "rule" will only lead to confusion.
by Sceptra Tenens
Tue May 22, 2012 9:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: .
Replies: 10
Views: 3725

Re: .

Good point.
by Sceptra Tenens
Fri May 18, 2012 8:43 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27001

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

28. At my house. Domī meī. // In domō/domū meō. // Apud meum. Apud me , not meum . Also, domus is feminine - meae and mea . 30. About terms of peace. Dē conditiōnibus pācis. condi c iōnibus 32. Round about the city. Circum orbem. urbem 33. On this side of the mountain. In hōc latere montis. Cis mon...
by Sceptra Tenens
Thu May 17, 2012 5:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: splendeo
Replies: 12
Views: 4151

Re: splendeo

In Richerus as well, also used impersonally.
Pro parte tamen ei fautum est, pro parte vero suppressum; ita tamen, ut et regi injuria non fieret, et operi nefario dux non consentiens pareret.
Not that he counts.
by Sceptra Tenens
Thu May 17, 2012 3:00 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: splendeo
Replies: 12
Views: 4151

Re: splendeo

Adrianus, I didn't think about that - of course it's the same perfect morpheme. Those darn v's always trick me. But is it really pedagogical to group splendeo and faveo together considering how differently their roots are affected by the morpheme? Perhaps not. I would never tell anyone that the per...
by Sceptra Tenens
Sat May 05, 2012 2:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: dep. in English?
Replies: 11
Views: 4413

Re: dep. in English?

You will go far astray if you try to use Greek and Latin grammatical categories to describe English. Fair enough. I found myself getting carried away with terms like "dative" and "ablative" after beginning Latin, when the cases don't fit well in English. Synonyma exacta "getting" vocabuli anglici /...