Search found 63 matches

by MickeyV
Fri Apr 08, 2005 12:54 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: English-Latin translation check
Replies: 4
Views: 1374

As to "advenire" taking the accusative, there exists an interesting difference from the German language, where verbs of arriving, on account of a difference in perspective, as a rule take the dative (for lack of an ablative). Such verbs therefore take in German an adverbial complement of location, w...
by MickeyV
Thu Sep 23, 2004 12:18 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Meat is Murder translation please?
Replies: 14
Views: 4796

I think not! :cry: Yet, whether or not the presence of the copula is desirable with a view to apportioning that "oomph" to the little sentence, we may leave to the judgement of the topicstarter. I didn't intend to prejudice on the aesthetic merits of omitting the copula, but merely sought to point o...
by MickeyV
Wed Sep 22, 2004 12:19 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Meat is Murder translation please?
Replies: 14
Views: 4796

One may even omit the copula "est", to attain that charming compactness characteristic of Latin. :D
by MickeyV
Mon May 17, 2004 2:36 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 'Quod'
Replies: 17
Views: 8238

That is actually incorrect, I'm afraid. Evidently, the quod-clause in this example ("In eo itinere, persuadet Castico, Sequano, cuius pater regnum in Sequanis moltos annos obtinuerat et a senatu 'populi Romani amicus' appellatus erat, ut regnum in civititate sua occuparet quod pater habuerat") does...
by MickeyV
Sun May 16, 2004 8:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 'Quod'
Replies: 17
Views: 8238

hi thucydides, i think that habuerat would be in the subjunctive , rather than indicative, if quod meant because , since it would be a causal clause where the reason given is on the authority of Orgetorix, not of Caesar the author (in which case it'd be indicative as it is here). see A&G s 540: htt...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 9:34 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentences confirmation 2
Replies: 6
Views: 2422

Quite right.
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 9:33 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The ~-sign
Replies: 7
Views: 3440

Is that so? That might very well be the case. If the ~ would indeed be a separate, relevant, Greek character, I should expect to be able to find it in Smyth's grammar, but I cannot. This sheds a favourable light on your point of view, benissimus. :)
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:57 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentences confirmation 2
Replies: 6
Views: 2422

#8 exper i entia (just a typo I suspect) #12 I think that sapientia should be accusative, as it is the object of the imperative. Also, me should be dative, as it is the indirect object. #13 tibi is dative, what you're trying to do here is describe the name, so I think you should use the adjective f...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translate this for me please
Replies: 1
Views: 1124

Somewhere along the line of "in te refugium invenio".
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:46 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: need help...! i really need to translate this..
Replies: 3
Views: 1977

benissime dictum. :D
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:43 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentences confirmation
Replies: 5
Views: 2443

Hmm, I'm having second thoughts on "ipsa". Although what I said about contrasting holds good, it would, in this case, be more aptly expressed, not by "ipsa", but simply by "ego". -> "ego me doceo". Why? Because the contrast consists in, not so much, that Arachne teaches herself all by herself, of he...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:20 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentences confirmation
Replies: 5
Views: 2443

Another: in 1, you should preferably use "est" only once. -> "Case parva, sed pulchra est." In fact, you may drop "est" altogether. When a form of "esse" in the indicative functions as a copula, it is often omitted. -> casa parva, sed pulchra. in 6 you should make some changes: it should be -> "mea ...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:10 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: sentences confirmation
Replies: 5
Views: 2443

And in 5 you should drop the prep. "in" in "in forma". Add.: you may wonder why. Herefore, that, "in the form of a woman" indicates a vague sense of manner in which (how, in what fashion, by what faculty does she walk? ) Thus, an instrumental ablative should be employed, which suffers no preposition...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 5:07 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The ~-sign
Replies: 7
Views: 3440

I'm afraid I don't quite follow you. Does this ~ equal a circumflex, and does it therefore function as an accent? Or is this ~ called a macron? And, if a macron makes an alpha, iota or upsilon long, how would that compare with the circumflex, as it does the same thing? I hope not to burden you with ...
by MickeyV
Sun May 02, 2004 2:16 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The ~-sign
Replies: 7
Views: 3440

The ~-sign

I have a minor question concerning Greek. What does the ~-sign that is sometimes positioned over a letter (e. g.: ã) indicate?

Thank you. :)
by MickeyV
Sat Apr 24, 2004 9:52 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Participles: which case do I use?
Replies: 6
Views: 2488

I suppose my own reply isn't the best example of brevity either. :D
by MickeyV
Sat Apr 24, 2004 9:50 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Participles: which case do I use?
Replies: 6
Views: 2488

Yvonne, unless I misunderstand you, I would think that you're still not entirely correct. In one thing you are, however: the answer to your question is, indeed, quite simple, however much Episcopus' lenghty dissertation concerning the object of your question might lead one to suspect otherwise. 8) R...
by MickeyV
Wed Mar 31, 2004 7:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Huysman's attack on Golden Age Latin authors
Replies: 1
Views: 1274

Haha. Quite funny indeed. :D
by MickeyV
Mon Mar 29, 2004 9:25 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin for the Brave
Replies: 11
Views: 4571

Ave, alauda, I would concur that Caesar, probably, wasn't the friendliest of persons according to our standards, and that his account of his own wars, manifestly, is only correct up to a point. Nonetheless I cannot subscribe to the view that Caesar was a destroyer, a madman, a brute, or whatever oth...
by MickeyV
Sun Mar 28, 2004 11:03 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin for the Brave
Replies: 11
Views: 4571

Salve, alauda. :) Quite right on all aspects. Save perhaps for one: I don't believe Caesar's chief works (de bello gallico and de bello civili) were written by anyone but he himself. Quite likely that he didn't write them in the physical sense (I think I've read somewhere that Caesar dictated the wo...
by MickeyV
Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:27 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin for the Brave
Replies: 11
Views: 4571

With the above I'm not implying, by the way, that poetry would be easier to read than prose. In my experience quite the contrary is true, which may be perhaps accounted for by my innate disinclination towards poetry. :)
by MickeyV
Sun Mar 28, 2004 12:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin for the Brave
Replies: 11
Views: 4571

Rule 2 is quite incorrect, I'm afraid. It may suffice for reading poetry, but the extended narrative of, say, Sallustius, requires that the reader not only know and understand the grammatical terminology so as to find his way in the dictionary, it also requires, and I would say it in particular requ...
by MickeyV
Tue Mar 09, 2004 1:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: About Roman history
Replies: 7
Views: 3319

Gratias. :)
by MickeyV
Sat Mar 06, 2004 9:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: About Roman history
Replies: 7
Views: 3319

by MickeyV
Sat Mar 06, 2004 9:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: About Roman history
Replies: 7
Views: 3319

Thanks, chad. About Gibbon: after some cursory investigation, your esteem of his work appears to be confirmed. However, it also appears, unless I'm mistaken of course, that his work covers "only" the later period of the empire, that is to say that it focuses on the collapse only. xn: I had in mind t...
by MickeyV
Fri Mar 05, 2004 11:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: About Roman history
Replies: 7
Views: 3319

About Roman history

A question: which would be the best book containing an overview of the entire Roman history?

Gratias. :)
by MickeyV
Fri Mar 05, 2004 11:45 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Eccite Hominem?
Replies: 15
Views: 7854

I wouldn't bother. Try German instead. :D
by MickeyV
Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:58 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6428

I reiterate: it's very good, bingley. Unfortunately, the price at amazon is an odd 80 pounds, so I'll read it online. :)

Cruttwell too, I say to Ulpianus, appears to have been quite fond of Caesar. Give it a read. :D
by MickeyV
Thu Feb 19, 2004 1:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6428

That seems quite suitable. Many thanks, bingley. :)
by MickeyV
Wed Feb 18, 2004 4:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6428

Well said, Skylax.

A side note: may I ask a general, somewhat off-topic, question? Can anyone recommend a good literature reference work? I tried ordering H. L. Rose's Latin Literature, yet it was unavailable. Any alternatives at all available? Gratias. :)
by MickeyV
Fri Feb 13, 2004 7:49 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6428

Add.: as to the subjunctive, Caesar shows how it should be done: His interfectis navibus eorum occupatis, prius quam ea pars Menapiorum quae citra Rhenum erat certior fieret , flumen transierunt atque omnibus eorum aedificiis occupatis reliquam partem hiemis se eorum copiis aluerunt. And, of course,...
by MickeyV
Fri Feb 13, 2004 7:39 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Is Caesar worth reading? Is Horace?
Replies: 16
Views: 6428

That's an interesting vision, surely, Ulpianus. And, I do agree with you that the scope of matters Caesar discusses is fairly limited. The main themes may be summed up quite nicely by "war, the excellence and virtues of the Roman people and Caesar in particular, the inferiority and perfidity of the ...
by MickeyV
Fri Feb 13, 2004 3:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6516

Say, Ulpianus, do you propose that Caesar's writing is, for the modern Latinist, merely functional? :cry: I'm a fan of him myself. 8) Brilliant, impeccable Latin, and, really, not hardly as boring as some, who've perhaps read the first few lines only, make it out to be. Take, for instance, this pass...
by MickeyV
Thu Feb 12, 2004 7:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help me Start Out
Replies: 14
Views: 6516

I disagree to an extent with previous posters. Latin is, in fact, not harder -nor, granted, easier- than most contemporary languages appear to be. From the internet I know, for instance, of two British students who had more difficulty with German than with Latin. So, while conceding that Latin isn't...
by MickeyV
Sun Feb 08, 2004 12:44 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need Translation Assistance
Replies: 9
Views: 3926

Examples may be multiplied, by the way. In legal Latin, if a Roman jurist wanted to write "after the making of the testament", he would write not "post factionem testamenti" but "post testamentum factum". And perhaps the most famous example is "ab urbe condita".
by MickeyV
Sun Feb 08, 2004 12:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Need Translation Assistance
Replies: 9
Views: 3926

I agree, Evito. "divina natura" may well mean "the fact that nature is divine" = "the divinity of nature" :) But a small remark: I don't think "dominant use adjectives (I suppose "adverb" is a small confusion?)" is settled terminology for most of us. A more common reference to this construction is "...
by MickeyV
Sat Feb 07, 2004 9:19 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: "there is" translation
Replies: 9
Views: 3575

smokeyrivers wrote:It would be Est feles in fenestra with a long a at the end. Now why there's a cat in the window I'll never know...
propterea enim quod in fenestram saluit. :roll:

:D
by MickeyV
Thu Feb 05, 2004 2:28 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Quick Help
Replies: 7
Views: 3040

Perhaps Emma confuses "per" with "super"? The last one may take either +acc., in which case it means "above,etc", or +abl., in which case it means "concerning, about" (basically equivalent to "de").
by MickeyV
Thu Feb 05, 2004 2:22 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 2nd Year Latin
Replies: 8
Views: 3424

benissimus wrote:I didn't post in this thread! :lol:
Oops. :)
I meant bingley. "benissimus" appears then to be a catchy name. :lol:
by MickeyV
Wed Feb 04, 2004 2:52 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: 2nd Year Latin
Replies: 8
Views: 3424

Indeed. To the topicstarter it may be remarked, as a "pons asinorum", that a great many compounded verbs (wherewith I refer to contractions of particles with verbs), such as "con-venire", "in-haerere", etc., are used with the dative of the indirect object. Therefore, when you see such a word and a d...