Search found 29 matches

by Silenus
Sun Feb 24, 2008 1:48 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Double Negatives
Replies: 10
Views: 6554

Lucus Eques wrote:Double negatives are always positive in Classical Latin. Like proper English.

Like improper English, however, the Romance languages fell from this grammatical grace and established double negatives as negative.

... Modern Greek too.
What is grammatically graceful about this?
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 3:09 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

Forgive me for having been snippy. I'm not in the best of moods at the moment. Could we agree to start over more civilly?

I'll try to respond later.
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 2:34 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

edonnelly wrote: But not all communication is English. Two people speaking Spanish to each other are not speaking in English, therefore English must have some set of rules that defines it -- it can't be entirely subjective.
But why is there only one English?
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 1:42 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

This guy sounds like someone I had in my IRC chat once. Since language is subjective, you either standardize it, or you let it have free reign, since anything in the middle is special pleading. This talk of "true mistakes" v. "dialectal differences" is a load of garbage. People communicate, and tha...
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 1:41 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

There are true mistakes? Please elaborate with examples. Sounds ghastly elitist to me. Pray tell, how will I distinguish "true mistakes" from "non-standard dialect?" Can an adult native-speaker of English make a "true mistake?" I already explained. A true mistake will be unique to the child and wil...
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 3:40 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

Yes there are different dialects but I am not convinced that this is a case of different uses in different dialects. (Not convinced is not the same as convinced of the opposite.) My fault. I misinterpreted what you meant. Even in different dialects, there are differences between speech and writing....
by Silenus
Sun Jan 20, 2008 3:39 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

Yes, if the belief that there is a difference between correct and incorrect English makes me an elitist then I confess that I am guilty as charged. By the way, on what day does the language of my children convert from that of a child to that of a "non-standard dialect?" Is it on their 18th birthday...
by Silenus
Sat Jan 19, 2008 5:28 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

No. As I said above, my kids are native English speakers and their usage and/or understanding of the language does not define what is or not grammatically correct. My younger daughter frequently uses 'her' as the subject of a sentence ('her went to the store'). To compare an adult speaker of a non-...
by Silenus
Sat Jan 19, 2008 3:26 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

Do you have a reference that would support that position? Under the interpretation of "than" as a preposition, "than I" would be ungrammatical. As to whether or not the "am" can optionally be dropped in most dialects of English, I was probably hasty to assume that in some dialects it could not (the...
by Silenus
Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:11 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: English Grammar Question
Replies: 62
Views: 15828

It's not that in colloquial speech, grammatical rules aren't followed; it's that different grammatical rules are used. In many (most?) colloquial dialects of English, "I am taller than he" is at best highly elevated (and atypical) speech, and at worst ungrammatical.
by Silenus
Thu Feb 22, 2007 3:41 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Resources for historical/indo-european linguistics?
Replies: 3
Views: 1263

I haven't seen Trask's book, but I've seen other fine works of his. I would assume that his text on historical linguistics would not be an exception. I second the other two recommendations. Both include a number of fairly useful exercises, as well as detailed explanations. And both are a joy to read...
by Silenus
Sat Dec 16, 2006 2:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Classical Pronounciation of "Lucrece"
Replies: 5
Views: 8002

The Roman name is Lucretia, which you may find easier to pronounce "classically." I don't believe that Lucrece is actually a classical name, but rather a more modern variant. This would explain why the classical pronunciation sounds unnatural.

The modern pronunciation of Lucrece is "Loo-crease."
by Silenus
Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:06 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: US bank note.
Replies: 11
Views: 2658

It's the one-dollar bill. The Wikipedia article has an explanation of the symbol (this link goes directly to that section).
by Silenus
Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Prosody and syllable stress
Replies: 153
Views: 78911

Hi, Silene, I'll try to find the Dixon-Aikenvald book because that sounds intriguing. And what you say about parsing could be right, but the identification of the 'ae' bit is the problem, plus the disambiguation. With "puellae, of the girl" I deconstruct 'of' = OK > 'o+f' = NOT OK, 'the' = OK > 'th...
by Silenus
Tue Oct 17, 2006 12:11 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Prosody and syllable stress
Replies: 153
Views: 78911

Re: Parsing with divisions is faster

Unfortunately, when it come to parsing words using computer techniques, it is much slower to do it in Latin than in English, and that's because of the junction between stem and inflection. One thing to keep in mind here is that English orthography is somewhat far removed from the actual linguistics...
by Silenus
Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:17 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Question about answer key...
Replies: 4
Views: 5346

Using eius in this sentence suggests that the farmer lives with someone ELSE'S daughter. What you need is the 3rd person reflexive pronoun, namely, suus-a-um. So, agricola cum sua filia in casa habitat. Ah, you're right! More than just suggesting, I can't think of any case where it wouldn't mean th...
by Silenus
Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:52 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: Question about answer key...
Replies: 4
Views: 5346

Context makes it pretty clear that it is the farmer's daughter being spoken about. Latin frequently leaves out the "his/her/its" that is usually explicit in English. This is just one of many words that you will need to insert when translating into English. If you wanted to make the "his" explicit, "...
by Silenus
Mon Oct 02, 2006 6:08 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Je viens d'obtenir dix-sept ans
Replies: 18
Views: 5263

Re: Je viens d'obtenir dix-sept ans

GlottalGreekGeek wrote:It has been exactly one year since this original post. Guess what?
Your birthday is still October 2nd? Happy birthday!
by Silenus
Mon Oct 02, 2006 12:35 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Classicist or Romanticist
Replies: 30
Views: 7414

I agree with annis and Silenus that English is not any worse a language now than it was then (I wonder why I did not make this clear in a previous post, but maybe I thought you could all read my mind or something). Ah, sorry. I did not read that in your posts, and I apologize if my reference to you...
by Silenus
Mon Oct 02, 2006 2:25 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Classicist or Romanticist
Replies: 30
Views: 7414

The relative pronoun has become a joke; Does one really need an -m at the end of the relative pronoun for comprehension that it is being used obliquely? some people even believe "that" and "who" are on their way to becoming purely interchangeable. They are. Collapses occur often. So do differentiat...
by Silenus
Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:52 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: English to Latin Chapter 3
Replies: 6
Views: 5616

Re: English to Latin Chapter 3

The reputation of men and women is great my friend. -Fama virorum et feminarum est magnorum amicus meus. One more thing here, "my friend" is a direct address in this sentence, and so amicus and meus should be in the vocative. I'm not sure whether or not Wheelock's mentions this early that the vocat...
by Silenus
Mon Jul 10, 2006 12:12 pm
Forum: The Agora
Topic: Prima compositio
Replies: 14
Views: 12801

Re: Prima compositio

Amadeus wrote:Amor vitae meae est scientia aut potius philosophia, regina omium scientiarum.
Alludisne proclationi Caroli Friderici Gauss de mathematica, non philosophia?
by Silenus
Fri Jun 23, 2006 9:32 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Roman calendar
Replies: 23
Views: 6477

I voted as if it said, will you buy one, although I actually do think it would sell.

Also, I think a more authentic version would be cooler than a Gregorian one.
by Silenus
Fri Jun 09, 2006 6:39 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Grinchus
Replies: 3
Views: 1358

I haven't actually read it, but my Latin teacher claims it's quite bad. Just look at the title, even that is overly wordy. The Cat in the Hat is supposed to be much better, as is Green Eggs and Ham (which has pretty good rhythm, although it loses the alternating rhythm effect of the rhythm), so if y...
by Silenus
Fri Jun 02, 2006 11:58 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Stress on words ending with enclitics
Replies: 5
Views: 1627

Stress on words ending with enclitics

Salve,

When an enclitic such as -que or -ve is attached to a word, does the stress remain where it would be if no enclitic were attached, or does the enclitic "count" as a syllable, thus potentially shifting the stress?
by Silenus
Thu Jun 01, 2006 12:11 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Vocative case
Replies: 29
Views: 8043

Um... on closer inspection I seem to have put my foot in my mouth. I didn't quite read the thread thoroughly and thought you were saying that in God saves the queen the 'saves' is indicative, not subjunctive. I now see you did not. My apologies. :oops: No problem, I figured that's what it was. I do...
by Silenus
Wed May 31, 2006 11:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Vocative case
Replies: 29
Views: 8043

Kasper wrote:
I think that is a matter of interpretation. Personally I agree with Lucus.
I'm confused...where do I interpret something differently from Lucus? (or am I just misunderstanding you?)
by Silenus
Wed May 31, 2006 5:06 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Vocative case
Replies: 29
Views: 8043

What makes that statement different from ''God is saving the Queen'' or ''God saves the Queen''? Thanks. servo, servare is a first conjugation verb, so "God is saving/saves the Queen" would be a present indicative, which would have the form "servat". Servet is in the subjunctive mood, making it a "...
by Silenus
Tue May 30, 2006 11:16 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: What gender is a verb?
Replies: 10
Views: 11127

nostos wrote:
'suiscum' is because you can attach pronouns to 'cum'.
Isn't suis an adjective and therefore not able to attach to the cum?