Search found 156 matches

by Craig_Thomas
Sun Sep 02, 2018 9:16 pm
Forum: The Agora
Topic: De variis latinis graecisque colloquendi formulis
Replies: 20
Views: 22758

Re: De variis latinis graecisque colloquendi formulis

Ad hanc in tabula octava pertinens:

If you do that, you will be punished. Hoc si egeris, non feres in tacitum. Εἰ τοῦτο ποιήσεις, οὐκ ἀτιμώρητος ἔσῃ.

Debet scribi "non feres tacitum", quod Ciceronis dictum est. Nusquam exemplum dicti "in tacitum" invenio.
by Craig_Thomas
Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:59 pm
Forum: The Agora
Topic: Colloquendi formulae: Tabula septima
Replies: 2
Views: 4246

Re: Colloquendi formulae: Tabula septima

Toto caelo erratur in hac locutione: To shout something from the rooftops. Sub diem (aliquid) rapere. Πανταχοῦ τι διαγγέλειν. Quod sciam, verba latina ex sententia quae dicitur a Quintiliano scripta esse oriuntur, "eam parasitus sub diem comitiorum rapuit", quod sibi vult "non multo ante diem quo co...
by Craig_Thomas
Fri Nov 21, 2014 9:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Bellum Gallicum 5. 44. 4 — Help!!!
Replies: 3
Views: 2098

Re: Bellum Gallicum 5. 44. 4 — Help!!!

The Loeb has quaque , so do Perseus (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0002%3Abook%3D5%3Achapter%3D44%3Asection%3D4) and PHI (http://latin.packhum.org/loc/448/1/0#105). The full Lewis and Short (http://athirdway.com/glossa/?s=irrumpo) does mention qua with irrumpo...
by Craig_Thomas
Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:45 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: ops, opis
Replies: 2
Views: 1652

Re: ops, opis

'Help' is certainly one of the word's meanings. If Orberg is suggesting that it's so in the genitive and ablative, above the other cases, I'd be curious to know on what basis he does so. This may not be helpful, but here's a funny little thing from one of Cicero's letters to Atticus, in which he not...
by Craig_Thomas
Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:17 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: your pronunciation of ii, iit, ierunt, etc.
Replies: 24
Views: 15235

Re: your pronunciation of ii, iit, ierunt, etc.

Would these, with 'exiit', satisfy? 'iit', it turns out, is quite a rare form! Verg., Georgics 2.81: exiit ad caelum ramis felicibus arbos, Verg., Aeneid 2.497 exiit oppositasque euicit gurgite moles, Someone might argue that 'i' could still be a consonant in 'jit', but made a vowel in the compound ...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Jul 03, 2013 5:53 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Caesura
Replies: 3
Views: 2707

Re: Caesura

Usually, you can tell where the pause is without scanning the line, as it falls where there's a clear break in the sense, such as at punctuation or before a conjunction. Where there's no obvious break such as this, it is most logical to take your breath about halfway along the line, usually in the t...
by Craig_Thomas
Fri May 31, 2013 2:01 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oath of the Night's Watch
Replies: 28
Views: 17059

Re: Oath of the Night's Watch

dum morior means "while I am dying". dum moriar (the subjunctive) would be "until I die".
by Craig_Thomas
Sun May 26, 2013 2:41 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oath of the Night's Watch
Replies: 28
Views: 17059

Re: Oath of the Night's Watch

in statione is better because he could not reasonably be thought to be at anyone else's station; meam mortem remains because his watch could plausibly end upon another's death. That said, I share Scribo's suspicion about the construction usque meam mortem, and would prefer something with dum or donec.
by Craig_Thomas
Sun May 26, 2013 10:48 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Oath of the Night's Watch
Replies: 28
Views: 17059

Re: Oath of the Night's Watch

There are some pronouns and possessive adjectives there that are redundant in Latin. I would erase ea from the second line, mea from in mea statione, and every ego.
by Craig_Thomas
Sun May 26, 2013 9:55 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Nulli viro
Replies: 4
Views: 2262

Re: Nulli viro

Nūllus is one of the few adjectives which follow the pronominal declension, that is to say, it mostly follows the first and second declensions but has a genitive singular ending in -īus and a dative singular ending in -ī . Ūllus is, as you would guess, another one. Tōtus, ūnus, sōlus, uter, neuter,...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed May 15, 2013 12:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Online reading/translation group, with Skype?
Replies: 3
Views: 2144

Re: Online reading/translation group, with Skype?

You might be interested in this free online mediaeval Latin reading group that starts in June:

http://blogs.dickinson.edu/dcc/2013/05/ ... ne-course/

It will take place on Google Plus, as I understand it, and the videos will apparently end up on YouTube.
by Craig_Thomas
Fri May 03, 2013 7:08 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: similis + dat?
Replies: 1
Views: 1332

Re: similis + dat?

The genitive is more usual, especially with people, but the dative is fine.

I think a more natural way to express this in Latin would be to say "facies eius in Ascanii faciem mutata/versa/conversa erat."
by Craig_Thomas
Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:49 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Gerundive or Gerund
Replies: 9
Views: 4770

Re: Gerundive or Gerund

The gerund is an active verbal noun. It's like an infinitive, except it has genitive, dative, and ablative forms, whereas an infinitive can only be nominative or accusative. The gerundive is a passive verbal adjective. You can think of it as another participle, a future passive participle. The gerun...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Mar 26, 2013 9:20 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: vocative case
Replies: 3
Views: 4930

Re: vocative case

It seems to be very unusual in prose, at least if you don't count exclamations. For instance, the word "iudices" occurs 491 times in Cicero's works (according to a search of the PHI database), and almost always in the vocative (according to my brief scan), but in the only three sentences where it is...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Mar 26, 2013 1:12 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Cur 'ali'?
Replies: 3
Views: 1862

Re: Cur 'ali'?

Intellegimus "aliquis" pro "quis" ubi horum unum verborum sequitur: si, nisi, ne, num.
by Craig_Thomas
Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Hae sententia designata difficiles sunt
Replies: 2
Views: 1504

Re: Hae sententia designata difficiles sunt

Aliis verbis dicatur:

"Si autem Aeneas mortuus est, hoc unum facite: dimitte nos in Siciliam, ab qua insula ad hoc litus advecti sumus, ut ad regem Acesten redeamus."

unde = ab quo loco, i.e., Sicilia
huc = ad hunc locum, i.e., Karthaginem

Estne tibi utile?
by Craig_Thomas
Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:58 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Two questions from Orberg LLPSI XXXVIII
Replies: 2
Views: 1611

Re: Two questions from Orberg LLPSI XXXVIII

postquam is a conjunction and praetereā an adverb, so it can't be "after which things" and "besides this one thing" as they would be respectively rendered with prepositions: post quae/haec and praeter hoc unum . postquam goes with the verb: "After he had said these [words/things] ..." Your first tr...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Protegimus. Persistimus.
Replies: 2
Views: 1640

Re: Protegimus. Persistimus.

I'm not sure that protego can be used without an object. It's a bit like writing in English "we cover" -- cover what? the reader is left asking. But then for all I know such things may be allowed in mottoes for the sake of brevity. Personally, I would read nos protegimus as 'we protect ourselves'. I...
by Craig_Thomas
Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:00 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Meaning of Lapis
Replies: 5
Views: 4708

Re: Meaning of Lapis

Lapis cannot itself be used as an adjective, unless you think of a noun's genitive as adjectival, which in a sense it is. One common way of making nouns into adjectives, when talking about the material of which something is made, is with the addition of -eus -ea -eum . So, lāneus means 'woolen' (fr...
by Craig_Thomas
Sat Jan 12, 2013 10:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: cuidam hosti ademerat
Replies: 3
Views: 2051

Re: cuidam hosti ademerat

Aeneas had taken the clipeus from a certain enemy. The enemy is in the dative because what the dative case essentially tells you is that the thing in the dative case in some way interested in or affected by the action described by the verb or the clause. Thus, it is not only used in clauses like "He...
by Craig_Thomas
Sun Dec 30, 2012 3:13 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: cuncta
Replies: 6
Views: 3184

Re: cuncta

Classis et cuncta sunt in casu nominativo.
by Craig_Thomas
Thu Dec 27, 2012 10:47 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: cuncta
Replies: 6
Views: 3184

Re: cuncta

"The whole fleet" is the subject.
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Dec 11, 2012 8:07 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: res futuras praedicenti
Replies: 2
Views: 1858

Re: res futuras praedicenti

Cassandrae is dative after credebat, and res futuras is the object of praedicenti: they didn't believe Cassandra when she spoke of things to come.
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Oct 09, 2012 10:02 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Soloecismi mendaque?
Replies: 6
Views: 3782

Re: Soloecismi mendaque?

INDĀGŌ
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:57 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Subjunctive Perfect vs Imperfect
Replies: 7
Views: 4150

Re: Subjunctive Perfect vs Imperfect

With result clauses, the verb goes in the tense that seems most appropriate to the sense. In other words, you use the tenses much as you would if the verb were in the indicative. Here, we're not saying that the enemies were taking the city or that the tree was falling , but that they have taken the ...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:04 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Soloecismi mendaque?
Replies: 6
Views: 3782

Re: Soloecismi mendaque?

I'm rather hopeless with newer Latin and with composition, so I can't offer much correction. Three things that stood out to me were loquere (a very active looking infinitive for a deponent verb like loquor ), ad exercendum artem linguae (where I'd expect the gerundive exercendam rather than a gerund...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:33 am
Forum: Latin For Beginners by D'Ooge
Topic: possessive adjectives/pronouns
Replies: 1
Views: 7257

Re: possessive adjectives/pronouns

The plural genitive forms nostrum and vestrum are used for the partitive genitive, e.g., unus nostrum , 'one of us', duo vestrum , 'two of you'. I think nostri and vestri are generally reserved for the objective genitive, e.g., amor nostri, 'love of us (i.e., 'love which is felt for us')'. Whether I...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Sep 04, 2012 3:29 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Re Orberg LLPSI Cap. XXXVII
Replies: 2
Views: 1594

Re: Re Orberg LLPSI Cap. XXXVII

1) fatum Troiae , 'the fate of Troy'. 2) a) Ita est. 2) b) quibus ille dies superus futurus erat , 'for whom that would be the final day' (or even 'was about to be' or 'was going to be'). 3) defensoribus sese adiungit , 'joined himself to the defenders'. 4) It's genitive, but an objective genitive, ...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:36 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: moriere
Replies: 3
Views: 2129

Re: moriere

-- or you will die at the same time!

The passive ending for second person singular can be -ris or -re. It is in Whitaker's: http://www.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin/word ... rd=moriere
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:06 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Can anyone deecline Aeneis, -idis (f) in full?
Replies: 2
Views: 1593

Re: Can anyone deecline Aeneis, -idis (f) in full?

The genitive tells you that the stem is Aenēid- and that it belongs to the third declension, so: Aenēis, Aenēidem, Aenēidis, Aenēidī, Aenēide. (It might also be expected to follow the Greek declension with accusative Aenēida and genitive Aenēidos.)
by Craig_Thomas
Sat Jun 16, 2012 5:57 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Subject and Predicate: telling apart
Replies: 4
Views: 3421

Re: Subject and Predicate: telling apart

I'm not sure there is any rule of word order we can use to determine subject from predicate. Most reasonably, and given the context, you take the old information as subject, and the new information as predicate, i.e., if the sentence were Augustus est princeps , you would take Augustus as subject if...
by Craig_Thomas
Sun May 27, 2012 3:24 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: periodic interpunction
Replies: 2
Views: 1517

Re: periodic interpunction

It must be some few centuries since we regularly used the colon that way in English, though I seem to remember Joyce often doing so in Ulysses . A quick flick through didn't reveal much, but there's this sort of thing in the 'Lotus-Eaters' chapter: Trams: a car of Preston's dyeworks: a widow in her ...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue May 15, 2012 9:49 pm
Forum: M&F's Latin: An Intensive Course
Topic: Quick Question, Unit 9
Replies: 1
Views: 5218

Re: Quick Question, Unit 9

I think curae here is what is called the predicative dative, meaning something like 'a source of concern': he begs that his hatred of the exiles not concern him when considering the penalty. That is ambiguous as I've translated it; presumably he's begging him to make his decision unclouded by his ha...
by Craig_Thomas
Tue May 08, 2012 1:59 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with Latin Please! "Fore decernimus"
Replies: 3
Views: 1913

Re: Help with Latin Please! "Fore decernimus"

That should be vitandos, not vintandos, and, unless gerundives work differently in Latin of this period, the last part of the sentence means "we decree that they must be shunned and punished". It refers to the future, and also has a sense of obligation.
by Craig_Thomas
Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:58 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27791

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

2. He has a garden which was given him by his friend. Eī hortus, quī eī ab amīcō suō dātus est. Hortus is the subject here, so ab amīcō suō , with the reflexive adjective, means 'by its [i.e., the garden's] own friend'. You could either alter the subordinate clause to express the possession non-ref...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:03 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help with a sentence in Bacon's Historia Henrici VII
Replies: 2
Views: 1560

Help with a sentence in Bacon's Historia Henrici VII

I'm after some help with a shamefully simple sentence in the Latin translation of Francis Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry VII . He has just been telling us how the king attracted hatred by postponing his queen's coronation: Neque enim secuta est coronatio reginae, nisi post duos annos, po...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27791

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

1. The subject is singular, and so the verb should be. 3. I wonder if possum should be in the perfect tense here. It seems logical to me. 6. 'Many things ' = neuter plural. 10. 'This' probably means they want a form of hic . 14. Better valdē than multō , I think, or the superlative of sapiēns . 18. ...
by Craig_Thomas
Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:01 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises
Replies: 52
Views: 27791

Re: N&H Prose Composition, preliminary exercises

9. Mīlitibus

19. Vēnī tibī, I think you mean, though it might more correctly be vēnī ad tē, fratrem meum or somesuch
by Craig_Thomas
Sun Apr 15, 2012 11:17 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Orberg Cap XXVIII
Replies: 5
Views: 2639

Re: Orberg Cap XXVIII

Every doctor does that.