Search found 140 matches

by mraig
Thu Oct 12, 2006 3:15 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: V: consonantal 'u' — new evidence
Replies: 13
Views: 4436

An interesting observation - the level of diversity preserved in local Italian dialects is, it seems, remarkable and fascinating. But can we really use this as evidence for the pronunciation of Latin 'v'? You say that this village's language has "more in common with Latin than modern Italian". I'm r...
by mraig
Fri Sep 29, 2006 6:36 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: omission of direct object from relative clause
Replies: 27
Views: 7261

The commentary I was referring to is a recent Cambridge, so it wouldn't be online as far as I know. And although the gen. of toutos is indeed omitted, the normal grammatically sound rule is for the relative pronoun's case to be dictated by its function within the relative clause -- we would expect a...
by mraig
Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:43 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: omission of direct object from relative clause
Replies: 27
Views: 7261

1. The issue of whether this is a genitive of cause or not doesn't change the fact that what's going on is attraction, though -- maybe I'm mistaken, but it seems as though this has been presented as an alternate explanation rather than attraction. It's got to be attraction, no matter what we do with...
by mraig
Thu Sep 21, 2006 6:41 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: consecutive clause
Replies: 27
Views: 8079

Perhaps the label of 'consecutive' is more fitting to analogous substantive clauses which are more clearly results: paries facit ut iungamur - this substantive 'ut' clause might be analyzed as a result: The wall makes it so that we are joined or as an object clause, in which the whole 'ut' clause is...
by mraig
Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:21 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Greek prepositions: Why are they so strange ?
Replies: 9
Views: 4199

Technically, in "turn the light on" and "that girl turns me on", 'on' is used as an adverb, not a preposition. 'On' can also be an adjective in the predicate position "The light is on", though it is rarely used in the attributive position (one rarely says in English "The on light is bright"). Which...
by mraig
Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:37 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Greek prepositions: Why are they so strange ?
Replies: 9
Views: 4199

Re: Greek prepositions: Why are they so strange ?

Hello to everybody, I'm still learning Greek and gradually things go right, but since I started to learn, I asked myself: Why greek prepositions are so strage ? They don't have just one meaning, but always several ones and I don't see the basic idea behind the word like direction etc. They seem to ...
by mraig
Sat Sep 09, 2006 5:40 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Purpose clauses
Replies: 17
Views: 4897

BellumPaxque: My grammar books back up everything you say BUT please someone explain to me why … … in my 1967 edition of Horace’s Odes published by Macmillan (1st edition 1883) edited by T.E. Page, Mr (Professor?) Page states in his Notes on this poem: “nunc est bibendum … The general mea...
by mraig
Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Purpose clauses
Replies: 17
Views: 4897

I have been reading A & G, but just when I want more, they stop with this: 533b. The Gerund and Gerundive constructions of purpose are usually limited to short expressions, where the literal translation, though not the English idiom, is nevertheless not harsh or strange. But just what exactly are t...
by mraig
Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:33 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Eumenides Translation
Replies: 5
Views: 1757

I think part of what makes the translation, especially of the end part, sound awkward, is that English is more comfortable making its points with a series of finite verbs one after the other, where Greek is more likely to subordinate one or more of a series of events with a participle. So the point ...
by mraig
Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:22 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Augustinus
Replies: 5
Views: 2069

Fascinating usage (although I imagine it would have sounded like a bit of a poetic stretch to Horace's audience. Then again, maybe not -- 'fore ut' is not uncommon). As you say, this is clearly the same thing: the 'ut' + subjunctive boxes up the entire clause and allows it to act as a noun, the subj...
by mraig
Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:14 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wordsworth's Daffodils in Latin
Replies: 17
Views: 5424

Quae volat in alto supra valles et colles? it seems that the relative clause has no verb stated or implied. What's volat , then? -David It's what he added after I called his original composition: nubes, Quae in summo volante supra valles et colles) into question. Hey, I didn't intend to make a big ...
by mraig
Thu Aug 31, 2006 11:37 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wordsworth's Daffodils in Latin
Replies: 17
Views: 5424

Quae in summo volante supra valles et colles, ? Well, I was trying to put the Wordsworth poem into Latin... I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing ...
by mraig
Thu Aug 31, 2006 5:09 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Wordsworth's Daffodils in Latin
Replies: 17
Views: 5424

Quae in summo volante supra valles et colles,
?
by mraig
Tue Aug 29, 2006 3:06 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Augustinus
Replies: 5
Views: 2069

Re: Augustinus

Hello friends, I am reading a bit of Augustinus. I am a bit puzzled about the following sentence: Itane, domine deus meus, est quicquam in me, quod capiat te? The meaning is clear, but why the ‘meus’ and not ‘mi’? He is clearly using the modus uocatiuus here, is he not? I imagine that becau...
by mraig
Sat Aug 19, 2006 1:03 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Single word, many answers
Replies: 8
Views: 1947

I agree with LE: there is generally no need for a separate word "as" in these cases (you could say something like "ut" or "sicut", but that would have a different shade of meaning: "tibi hoc (sic)ut donum do" would seem to me to mean something like "I give you this as if it were a gift (when, in fac...
by mraig
Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Carmen Catulli 61
Replies: 15
Views: 4814


by mraig
Thu Aug 17, 2006 3:13 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: that you will learn
Replies: 7
Views: 1891

What is the context of this phrase? In certain circumstances, the present subjunctive has future implications: doceo ut discas -- I teach so that you will learn. (Stuffy 19th c. translation: "...so that you may learn.") Other than that BPq's circumlocution is a good way to do it, and you seem to rea...
by mraig
Thu Aug 17, 2006 3:06 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Ludus
Replies: 3
Views: 1017

I believe the primary and original meaning of 'ludus' is "organized sport" -- a "game" in the sense of a spectacle put on for other people (like in modern English: "a football game") From there, it seems the meaning expanded to include any activity where a group of young people got together and trai...
by mraig
Thu Aug 17, 2006 3:01 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Carmen Catulli 61
Replies: 15
Views: 4814

'te' is definitely reflexive with 'abstinere', a common construction with 'abstineo' -- to keep (teneo) yourself (te) away (abs) from something. Interaxus, this isn't working like your examples, which are active. In the sentence "you say that you are reading a book", the second "you" must be represe...
by mraig
Sun Aug 13, 2006 6:23 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Word for "forever"
Replies: 5
Views: 1702

'perpetuo', as well as 'in perpetuum' means 'forever' and is used in the down-to-earth dialogue of Plautus and Terence's comedies. Or you could just reword the phrase; instead of "vanish forever" you could say "never be seen again". The English expression "vanish forever" seems a tad idiomatic, in t...
by mraig
Sun Aug 13, 2006 6:30 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Short book in Latin?
Replies: 12
Views: 3312

What did you hate about Martial?

I think Ovid is an absolute joy to read, and is one of the easiest poetry authors. If you want something you can finish, try some of his love poetry - a book of the Ars Amatoria or Amores should fit the length requirement.
by mraig
Wed Aug 09, 2006 4:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Easiest/Most Interesting Latin Texts?
Replies: 19
Views: 7199

You could probably have fun with it, but Plautus is a pretty difficult author - and his early date makes his Latin somewhat different from what you learn in first-year textbooks. I think it might be easy to get discouraged. If you are set against Caesar (and I think Caesar gets dumped on unneccessar...
by mraig
Wed Aug 09, 2006 4:46 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Where da verb at?
Replies: 17
Views: 4739


by mraig
Tue Aug 08, 2006 1:40 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Looking up vocabulary
Replies: 7
Views: 1982

Well, on the one hand, I can't imagine looking a word up in the dictionary without, on some level, making an educated guess as to what it might mean. I mean, don't you just naturally speculate about a word's meaning the moment you see it, whether based on the context of the sentence or on whatever r...
by mraig
Mon Aug 07, 2006 3:57 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: verbal adjectives
Replies: 13
Views: 4953

There is a third use of the -εος verbal adj. - they are sometimes used impersonally, but still with an active sense. Therefore you might see διαβατέος ? πόταμος for 'the river must be crossed' (with the adj. agreeing with the noun in case/number/gender), but you might also see the verbal adj. in the...
by mraig
Mon Aug 07, 2006 6:11 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Plato Help
Replies: 7
Views: 2109

OH I SEE! The main clause of the conditional is the part made 'indirect' and the participal construction works conditionally. Right! Participles in Greek often imply a lot more than the simple English translation '____ing' or 'having _____ed'. The presence of ἄν in the main clause is often a clue t...
by mraig
Sun Aug 06, 2006 4:41 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Plato Help
Replies: 7
Views: 2109


by mraig
Fri Aug 04, 2006 7:04 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: one of the greatest
Replies: 8
Views: 2126

Or maybe Caesar qui fortissimus miles habetur... David The problem with this, I think, is that it's a bit stronger than the English, which, by saying "ONE OF the bravest", softens the superlative a bit. Of course the Latin superlative, as you say, can have the sense of "really really brave" rather ...
by mraig
Thu Aug 03, 2006 9:52 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: one of the greatest
Replies: 8
Views: 2126

I wonder if there is any need to use a word for "one" at all. I would think that if you wanted to say "Caesar is one of the strongest soldiers", you would probably just say, "Caesar est inter fortissimos milites" - literally "Caesar is among the strongest soldiers", which sounds more Latin to me tha...
by mraig
Thu Aug 03, 2006 9:41 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: α?τός & idiom
Replies: 2
Views: 1123

Each of the 'autos's is doing something different, and they are both necessary. The second one, 'hauton' (he + auton), is the REFLEXIVE pronoun - it means that the person of the direct object is the same person as the person of the subject. (tickle himself, rather than tickle him, someone else). The...
by mraig
Tue Aug 01, 2006 2:10 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: translation/syntax question
Replies: 21
Views: 5142

Thanks!
by mraig
Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:22 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: translation/syntax question
Replies: 21
Views: 5142

Here is a very interesting piece on the difference between hunting and pecking through a sentence for subject/verb (on the one hand) and reading in the order the words come (one the other) - long, but worth a read: http://www.bu.edu/mahoa/hale_art.html It's about Latin, not Greek, but there's no rea...
by mraig
Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:11 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Carmen Catulli 39
Replies: 3
Views: 1126

To answer the question about translation, monendum est te mihi would be something like: "I must warn you" (more literally, if a literal rendition into English is in any way possible, "there must be a warning you by me" or "it must be warned you by me").
by mraig
Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:02 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Negative passive periphrastics
Replies: 13
Views: 5032

L.E. - I agree that in all of the examples I posted, "Not to be ____ed" gets the meaning across - but I don't see how that makes the more idiomatic translations (which I have tried to supply) inaccurate. In fact, in the first example from the Cicero 'in Catilinam' passage: Superiora illa, quamquam f...
by mraig
Thu Jul 27, 2006 6:05 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Negative passive periphrastics
Replies: 13
Views: 5032

From a very very quick survey of some examples, it seems that the meaning is closer to "must not be..." than "doesn't have to be..." Some examples: Aeneid 3.169-70 surge age et haec laetus longaeuo dicta parenti haud dubitanda refer. the "dicta... haud dubitanda" seems to be "words... which must not...
by mraig
Sat Jul 22, 2006 11:58 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Phonetic spelling of greek words...
Replies: 17
Views: 12680

I find it really puzzling that what seem to be simple, uncontroversial statements by Lucus are being treated as if shocking or offensive. As I understand it, he is simply saying: (1) The way that we, in English, pronounce Greek loan-words has nothing to do with any actual Greek pronunciation, but is...
by mraig
Sat Jul 15, 2006 4:46 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: From a history of Rome
Replies: 1
Views: 913

1. the 'erat' applies equally to both clauses: Romana res (erat) firma, et...

2. 'res' here perhaps roughly equals 'state' (cf. res publica)

3. 'par' takes the dative (equal to...) and the ablative (with respect to...)
by mraig
Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:43 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: participle of εἰμί
Replies: 39
Views: 13674


by mraig
Mon Jun 26, 2006 1:26 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone
Replies: 4
Views: 2009

annis wrote:
mraig wrote: (also keep in mind that there are no commentaries to help you with Harry Potter)
That's not quite true: Greek Harry Potter, from the translator himself. The vocabulary list is especially useful.
Neat!
by mraig
Sun Jun 25, 2006 7:14 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Quiet as a grave
Replies: 1
Views: 734

Re: Quiet as a grave

Here's the next sentence in our saga: Silensiosus tanquam sepulcrum erat et quidqam indicia virgines non erant usquam et eae convivium parantes fuerint. It was as quiet as a grave and there was no sign of the maidens anywhere and they were to be preparing a banquet. Comments would be appreciated. D...