Search found 121 matches

by Elucubrator
Wed Sep 24, 2003 9:01 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Apple iSight webcam iChat AV, anyone?
Replies: 3
Views: 1571

Apple iSight webcam iChat AV, anyone?

Well, I just got one of these in the mail, and was wondering whether there were any Textkitters that have both an Apple computer, an iSight camera, iChat AV, and an AIM account who would like to video chat?<br /><br />Apparently, the software is still developmental and there is no compatibility yet ...
by Elucubrator
Wed Aug 27, 2003 7:25 pm
Forum: M&F's Latin: An Intensive Course
Topic: M&F Unit 1 Pg35 #19
Replies: 5
Views: 6927

Re:M&F Unit 1 Pg35 #19

<br /> <br />Feminae est forma, fama nautae; feminis est forma, fama nautis.<br /><br /> <br /> <br /><br />Remember that in Latin, est can also mean "there is" , hence:<br /><br />For the woman there is beauty, for the sailor fame; for the women there is beauty, for the sailors fame. <br /><br />T...
by Elucubrator
Tue Aug 26, 2003 8:05 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Inscription "ANDG" at Jesuit school
Replies: 10
Views: 4856

Hyperbaton

[quote author=klewlis link=board=3;threadid=526;start=0#4945 date=1061904986]<br />if it is "greater glory" (which makes sense because of the cases) then why is dei plunked right between those? wouldn't it make more sense to put maiorem gloriam together?<br />[/quote]<br /><br /><br />This is a real...
by Elucubrator
Sun Aug 24, 2003 12:11 am
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: The Third Declension
Replies: 31
Views: 18960

Re:The Beautiful Third Declension

Sorry, I couldn't vote because no choice was given in the poll to categorise the beautiful third declension. Just because something is difficult doesn't make it evil. Personally, I love the variety of stems that exist in the third declension and the consequent variety in sounds that it makes possibl...
by Elucubrator
Sun Jul 06, 2003 10:36 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Are undergrads supposed to memorise vowel length and accents
Replies: 1
Views: 2893

Re:Are undergrads supposed to memorise vowel length and acce

Hi Chris:<br /><br />First of all don't worry; although knowing such things as vowel quantities and accentuation are a great help (Frankly, I don't know how people get by without it.) it is still not something that will hold you back from switching over to a Classics focused department. In truth, sa...
by Elucubrator
Fri Jul 04, 2003 2:45 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Traditional Greek Costume
Replies: 2
Views: 2919

Traditional Greek Costume

This post is really a response to the one called Avatars by Jeff on the Forum Guidelines board; those are always locked messages. <br /><br />Anyway, the traditional male Greek costume is..... no costume at all. Some brilliant quotes from Oscar Wilde are a propos here:<br /> <br /> To be truly medie...
by Elucubrator
Fri Jul 04, 2003 4:26 am
Forum: Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry
Topic: Accents in Homer
Replies: 5
Views: 8820

General discussion on accents & pronunciation

Such a beautiful topic, the latent music of Greek verse. Perhaps the arrangement of words in the lines of verse took into account (as well as the metre) the pitch accent of the words, so that by word choice and proper arrangement the poet could choose between one melody and another. I have often thought about that and have experimented much with it. <br /><br />The best place for information on the pronunciation of ancient Greek is the book Vox Graeca, by W. Sidney Allen, which as far as these matters go is insuperable. From it you will learn how much of the ancient pronunciation can be accurately reconstructed, and what areas remain in the shade for you to experiment with and decide for yourself what was most likely and then debate it with others.<br /><br />Beside the indications known to us all, viz. that the acute represented a rise in the musical pitch, the circumflex a rise followed by a drop in the musical pitch on the same syllable, and the grave a drop or no change at all in pitch. I can add the following elucidations and suggestions. <br /><br />(1) Not every accent is necessarily written on a Greek word. Every single acute accent implies a drop in pitch on the following syllable. If all the accents were to be written the word for man would then look like this:<br /><br />[size=150]ἄνθρὼπος<br /><br />but since this is unnecessary as it is obvious to everyone that once the pitch goes up it must come down, it is not in fact written. Knowing this will help one to understand the circumflex accent better.<br /><br />(2) the circumflex accent represents a rise in pitch, marked thus: / , followed by a drop back to the base pitch on the same syllable, marked like this: \ . When the two separate symbols representing the rise and fall were written on the same syllable, over the same vowel, they looked like this: /\ , and now you see where the circumflex gets its shape. Later it gets stylised into the perhaps more familiar squiggle ~ .<br /><br />(3) As for the grave accent, most books tell you that it indicates a drop in pitch or, a substitution of a steady for a raised pitch. I am inclined to agree with William that it indicates no change, for as a sign marking the drop of a musical pitch it is only traceable in writing as the second part of the stroke in the circumflex accent, and as we saw in number (1) the Greeks never saw a need to write the grave accent on a syllable following an acute where the drop was indicated. <br /><br />The rules tell us that the grave accent appears only on the ultima (final syllable of a word) and only appears when it replaces an acute accent when a word follows without pause. This indicates that the rise in pitch marked by the acute accent when it appears on the ultima is only pronounced when there is a pause which follows, as at the end of a sentence.<br /><br />That rise in the pitch on the ultima of a word would be one of the signs to a speaker of the language that a thought had come to its formal completion, though it could never have been the only sign, and the ancient Greek would not have had to depend on that to know this, since obviously a sentence may end with a paroxytone (fancy term that indicates a Greek word with an acute accent on the penultimate syllable). Such a sentence would end with the drop back to the base level indicated by that invisible grave accent. A sentence could also end with a perispomenon (this term indicates a word bearing a circumflex accent on its ultima), and as such will also close a thought on a drop in pitch. There are other possibilities as well, but still the fact that the grave accent has no other use than to keep one from raising the pitch at the end of a word when there is no pause suggests that it didn't sound right to a Greek to pronounce a word with a drop in pitch on its first syllable. (Note that enclitics do not count as they modified the sense or meaning of a preceding word and were treated as part of that same word).<br /><br />To say that the grave indicates a drop in musical pitch would be granting it a role that it does not exhibit elsewhere (ignoring its traces in the circumflex which we have seen in number (2) above), and which in no way affects the meaning of a word as the acute and circumflex elsewhere can. For these reasons I have chosen to represent it in speech as a steady pitch on the base level, where the rise in pitch apparently interrupts the rhythm and steady flow of the Greek sentence.<br /><br />Ok, so at this point we know that the acute marks a rise in pitch, and a circumflex a rise and a drop. Now comes the question of how high a rise in pitch. I have also heard (somewhere) that the acute indicated the interval of a musical fifth, but I don't remember where I heard this. At any rate, it's conceivable that the interval of a fifth may have expressed the maximum interval realised, which might have been employed as William suggested in formal situations. But the fact is that there are multiple things that will change the way the language is sounded. The mood of the speaker, for instance, will come into play. An angry or excited person will speak much faster and much louder. A person mocking another may in fact exaggerate the pitches and speak in a whiny tone. In relaxed conversation the pitches may have been less pronounced. In debate or for strong emphasis of a particular point the pitch may get sharpened, but probably never above a fifth as it is really hard to do for the voice to realise without either shifting from speech to song or sounding entirely contrived.<br /><br />I read in one of the Latin authors that there were people in Rome who affected a pitch accent when speaking Latin (which did not have these) in order to emulate the Greeks. Perhaps this is how the pitch accent in Italian and Argentine Spanish (through its italian influence) has its origin, and it may be that the pitches in modern italian speech still bear a trace of the ancient Greek pitch accent. It's worth noting that in these modern languages the pitches are used for emphasis but aren't necessary, and though they are somewhat variable in their range, there is a certain limit above which the voice cannot climb in pitch, without sounding unnatural in the language. I suspect that it may have been the same with the ancient Greek pitch accents.<br /><br />As for vowel quantities and rhythm of speech. In all the textbooks it is stated that a long vowel has two morae and a short has one. Given the fact that a foreign language always sounds much faster to non-native speakers who are trying to keep up with what someone is saying, I prefer to restate the rule for vowele quantity in the following fashion: a long vowel = one mora, and a short vowel = half a mora. It should sound fast to us if it is to sound accurate. Nobody ever said when listening to native speakers carrying on in a foreign language, "God, you speak so slow", and all the traveller's phrase books include the line for the helpful request "could you please speak more slowly?" But for the native speakers, they weren't speaking fast, and if they were to demonstrate what speaking fast was like to prove it to you, you wouldn't catch a single word. :)<br /><br />Of course, all the same elements which may have affected the pronunciation will also come into play here, as mood of the speaker and so forth. There can in fact never be an exact formula or one exact pronunciation.<br /><br />In how many meaningful yet different manners of pronunciation can you perform the following English sentence?<br /><br /> I don't know what happened.<br /><br />Is the person being defensive, perhaps answering an accusation? Is it one of the American kids in disbelief in the locker room after having defeated the Russian red army team in the gold medal olympic ice hockey match of the mid eighties? Is it someone coming to, being questioned by paramedics at the scene of an accident? Is it perhaps someone who has been announced as the winner of a a raffle for a new car, someone who had not purchased a ticket? <br /><br />Which of these ways or any of the other ways that you can come up with to read the sentence should we call the correct way of pronouncing it?<br /><br />Well, I am not sure if I have helped matters or muddled them. At any rate it is great to be talking about this and thinking about the possibilities, and realising that the rules given were probable not completely inflexible. <br /><br />By the way of an afterthought, Allen discusses how there was a stress accent as well in ancient Greek, and how, the stress also occurs on the syllable that carries the pitch.<br /><br />Sebastian
by Elucubrator
Fri Jun 13, 2003 1:28 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: The C
Replies: 3
Views: 4331

Re:The C

The C is the sigma. Because of its shape it is called the lunate sigma and in texts where it is used it is employed equally at the end of words and in all other positions as well.<br /><br />Sebastian
by Elucubrator
Tue Jun 03, 2003 6:14 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Which Accusative is the Object
Replies: 2
Views: 3828

Re:Which Accusative is the Object

Hi Bert,<br /><br />try reading from left to right, as a Greek would be hearing the spoken words. When you get to "tov stpathgov pempeiv", you know already that you are in an accusative and infinitive construction, and the "general" could be subject or object, but as soon as you hear the verb "ekele...
by Elucubrator
Tue Jun 03, 2003 3:49 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Original Manuscripts?
Replies: 11
Views: 9214

Re:Original Manuscripts?

[quote author=Milito link=board=6;threadid=125;start=0#673 date=1054569178]<br />(Chapters/Indigo lists a book by William A Johnson, University of Toronto Press, called Bookrolls and Scribes in Oxyrhynchus , and says that it's to be published in December 2003. Is this the one you were meaning?)<br /...
by Elucubrator
Mon Jun 02, 2003 2:24 pm
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Rant against Wheelock's Latin
Replies: 68
Views: 74620

Re:Rant against Wheelock's Latin

Hey Kiwi, :)<br /><br />The Moreland and Fleischer text makes for a great reference as well; the appendix has a complete grammar and syntax of Latin (though obviously much simpler than the specialised grammars of Gildersleeve & Lodge, or Allen & Greenough).<br /><br />The explanations in the units o...
by Elucubrator
Sun Jun 01, 2003 4:23 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: SPIonic 'incomprehensible' on my machine
Replies: 7
Views: 7317

Unwanted Spaces - Solution

You could write everything in Capital letters without the accents, and to be really authentic you wouldn't even have to use the space-bar. ;D<br /><br />Can you read this:<br /><br />[size=150] ’αμαδετηῑημεραισυνελθοντες σορυκιτο’νοζαμυαθειογηταρτς ουτεαλλονπεμποισημανουντᾱο οτιονιαφσοτυαετυονιειοπηρχιτ εδοξενουναυτοισσυσκευασαμε σωε’νεθσορποτσιειανειορπσιον κυρωισυμιξειαν<br /><br />How does that work? ;D<br /><br />It's from Xenophon's Anabasis (II.1.2)<br /><br />Have fun, and watch the wrap. ;)<br /><br /><br />Sebastian
by Elucubrator
Sun Jun 01, 2003 5:40 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Original Manuscripts?
Replies: 11
Views: 9214

Re:Original Manuscripts?

[quote author=William Annis link=board=6;threadid=125;start=0#646 date=1054421522]<br />Thus Callimachus,<br /><br />[size=150]μέγα βιβλίον μέγα κακόν<br /><br />"A big book is a big pain."<br />[/quote]<br /><br />Ahhh, that's what he meant. I thought he meant that a book that was too big was just boring. I would apply the quote to the LSJ, otherwise known as the muleslayer. <br /><br />I like the translation: "a big book, a big evil". :) makes much more sense when you think of the roll. Can you imagine if you dropped your book on a hill! That would be a mess. :o<br /><br />-S. ;D
by Elucubrator
Sat May 31, 2003 10:34 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Original Manuscripts?
Replies: 11
Views: 9214

Re:Original Manuscripts?

One thing I have learned about the terminology of ancient books is that the term "scroll" applies only to biblical texts, whereas all other texts receive the term "roll". <br /><br />The roll was held in both hands and read from left to right, not top to bottom, so the text had the appearance of a b...
by Elucubrator
Sat May 31, 2003 9:57 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Introduction
Replies: 3
Views: 4073

Re:Introduction

Hi Bert and welcome to the Forum. There are some new biblical Greek books that are coming up for download soon. And the next Greek newsletter will have a biblical Greek focus. <br /><br />Canadian, eh? ;)<br /><br />Sebastian
by Elucubrator
Thu May 22, 2003 4:09 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Anacreontics
Replies: 6
Views: 6836

Re:Anacreontics

[size=18=12] ιτ δεφινιτελψ σουνδς λικε αναξρεον το με συδγινγ βψ οτηερ ποεμς οφ ηις ωηιξη ι ηαvε ρεαδ. τηις ονε φιτς τηε μετριξαλ παττερν, οφ αναξρεοντιξ vερσες αλτερνατινγ ωιτη ιονιξ ονες, ανδ ιτ σπεακς οφ ωρεατηες, ροσες, διονψσυς, α λψρε, δανξινγ ωιτη τηε δεεπ βοσομεδ γιρλ.... νοω, ψουρ τεχτ ις δεφινιτελψ νοτ ριγητ. ι ξουλδ ονλψ ρεξονστρυξτ σο μυξη οφ ιτ, ανδ αμ στιλλ μισσινγ τηε λαστ ωορδ ιν τηε τηιρδ λινε. ιτ μυστ βε α ωορδ οφ τωο λονγ σψλλαβλες, ανδ ιτ μυστ βεγιν ωιτη α vοωελ. τηε ινφινιτιvε ατ τηε βεγιννινγ οφ τηε φιρστ λινε μυστ βε δεπενδινγ ον σομε ιμπερατιvε, ιφ ψου γοτ τηε λαστ τηρεε λεττερς ιν τηατ ωορδ ριγητ, αν οπτατιvε οφ ωιση περηαπς. περηαπς αλσο τηε στεφανοῦν με γοες ωιτη σομετηινγ τηατ πρεξεεδεδ τηεσε λινες, ανδ α νεω ξλαυσε βεγινς ωιτη καί, βυτ ι ηαvε σεεν οτηερ φιvε‐λινερς ιν τηις εχαξτ μετριξαλ παττερν ωριττεν βψ αναξρεον. ατ ανψ ρατε, ηερε ις τηε παρτιαλλψ ρεξονστρυξτεδ τεχτ ωιτηουτ τηατ ωορδ·<br /><br /><br />[size=150] στεφανοῦν με καὶ λυρίζω πάρα σου Διώνυσ’ ? ? ? μέτα Κούρης βαθυκόλπου, ῥοδινοῖσι στεφανίσκοις πεπυκάσμενος χορεύσω.<br />[size=18=12] υντιλ ωε ξαν φιγυρε ουτ ωηετηερ ι ηαvε τηε φιρστ λινε ριγητ ορ νοτ (ωηιξη ι δουβτ), ανδ ωηατ τηατ λαστ ωορδ ιν τηε τηιρδ λινε ις, ουρ τρανσλατιον φορ τηε φιρστ λινε ξαννοτ βε ξομπλετε. τηε σταρτινγ πηρασε οφ λινε τηρεε ρεαδς· "βεσιδε ψου διονψσυς (vοξατιvἐ"τηε λαστ τηρεε λινες ρεαδ· (ιν ρεγυλαρ ενγλιση προσε ορδεῤ δεξκεδ ωιτη γαρλανδς οφ ροσες, ι σηαλλ δανξε τογετηερ ωιτη τηε δεεπ‐βοσομεδ γιρλ.ωελλ, σο μυξη, ατ τηις τιμε ξαν ι ηανδ βαξκ,ψουρς,σεβαστιαν<br />
by Elucubrator
Wed May 21, 2003 7:17 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Discussion: Homeric Epithets and Lessons in Metre
Replies: 3
Views: 3146

Discussion: Homeric Epithets and Lessons in Metre

[size=18=12][u]αβστραξτ οφ τηε νεωσλεττερ αρτιξλε[/u][i]τηις αρτιξλε ωιλλ ιντροδυξε ψου το σομε οφ τηε οραλ ξομποσιτιον τεξηνιθυες υσεδ βψ τηε ανξιεντ γρεεκ βαρδς ιν τηε ξονστρυξτιον οφ ηομεριξ Vερσε. φιρστ ιτ εχαμινες τηε στρυξτυρε οφ τηε δαξτψλιξ ηεχαμετερ ανδ τηε ποιντς ωιτηιν ιτ ωηερε α μαιν ξαεσυρα μυστ βε πρεσεντ. τηεν ιτ λοοκς ατ ηοω τηε ρηαπσοδε υσες φορμυλαιξ νουν‐επιτηετ παιρς ωιτηιν τηις ρηψτηψμιξαλ στρυξτυρε το ασσιστ ηιμ ιν τηε φρεε οραλ ξομποσιτιον οφ επιξ vερσε. ιν ορδερ το ηελπ τηε ρεαδερ δεvελοπ α φεελ φορ τηε ρηψτηψμς ινηερεντ ιν τηε ηεχαμετερ ωιτη ωηιξη τηε βαρδ ωουλδ ωορκ, τηε αυτηορ πρεσεντς α σηορτ σεριες οφ οραλ εχερξισες βασεδ ον τηε ρηψτηψμς οφ επιξ vερσε φορμ. [/i]τηις βοαρδ ηας βεεν οπενεδ φορ δισξυσσιον οφ τηε αρτιξλε ιν τοδαψ’ς γρεεκ νεωσλεττερ. ψου μαψ αξξεσς τηε αρτιξλε ηερε·[b] Ηομεριξ Επιτηετσ ανδ Εασψ Λεσσονσ ιν Ηομεριξ Μετρεηττπ·//ωωω.τεχτκιτ.ξομ/τυτοριαλσ/20030515–ηομερ–01–παγἔ.πηπ[/b]
by Elucubrator
Wed May 21, 2003 6:21 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Matthew Arnold - Best Translation Poll
Replies: 1
Views: 1685

Matthew Arnold - Best Translation Poll

[size=18=12]τηε φολλοωινγ πασσαγε ις φρομ ηομερ’ς [u]ιλιαδ[/u], βοοκ ιιι, λινες 234 ‐ 244. ιφ ψου αρε νοτ ψετ αδvανξεδ ενουγη το ρεαδ τηε γρεεκ ψου μαψ στιλλ vοτε ον ωηιξη οφ τηε τρανσλατιονς βελοω στρικες ψου ας τηε μοστ βεαυτιφυλ.<br /><br />[size=150] "νῦν δ’ ἄλλους μὲν πάντας ὁρῶ ἑλίκωπας ’Αχαιούς, οὕς κεν ἐυ6 γνοίην καί τ’ οὔνομα μυθησαίμην· δοιὼ δ’ οὐ δύναμαι ἰδέειν κοσμήτορε λαῶν, Κάστορά θ’ ἱππόδαμον καὶ πὺξ ἀγαθὸν Πολυδεύκεα, αὐτοκασιγνήτω, τώ μοι μία γείνατο μήτηρ. ἢ οὐχ ἑσπέσθην Λακεδαίμονος ἐξ ἐρατεινῆς, ἢ δεύρω μὲν ἕποντο νέεσσ’ ἔνι ποντοπόροισι, νῦν αὖτ’ οὐκ ἐθέλουσι μάχην καταδύμεναι ἀνδρῶν, αἴσχεα δειδιότες καὶ ὀνείδεα πόλλ’ ἅ μοί ἐστιν." Ὣς φάτο, τοὺς δ’ ἤδη κάτεχεν φυσίζοος αἶα ἐν Λακεδαίμονι αὖθι, φίλῃ ἐν πατρίδι γαίῃ.<br /><br />[size=18=12][u][b]τρανσλατιονς[/b][/u] 910 Ριξηιε 920 Αλεχ 930 Τομ 940Βοβ 950 Σαμ910 "Ανδ Ι σεε τηεμ αλλ νοω, αλλ τηε ρεστ οφ τηε γλανξινγ–εψεδ Αξηαιανσ αλλ ωηομ Ι ωουλδ κνοω ωελλ βψ σιγητ, ωηοσε ναμεσ Ι ξουλδ τελλ ψου, ψετ νοωηερε ξαν Ι σεε τηοσε τωο, τηε μαρσηαλσ οφ τηε πεοπλε, Καστορ, βρεακερ οφ ηορσεσ, ανδ τηε στρονγ βοχερ, Πολψδευκεσ, μψ οων βροτηερσ, βορν ωιτη με οφ α σινγλε μοτηερ. Περηαπσ τηεσε ξαμε νοτ ωιτη τηε ρεστ φρομ Λακεδαιμον τηε λοϛελψ, ορ ελσε τηεψ διδ ξομε ηερε ιν τηειρ σεα–ωανδερινγ σηιπσ, ψετ νοω τηεψ αρε ρελυξταντ το γο ωιτη τηε μεν ιντο βαττλε δρεαδινγ τηε ωορδσ οφ σηαμε ανδ αλλ τηε ρεπροαξη τηατ ισ ον με." Σο σηε σποκε, βυτ τηε τεεμινγ εαρτη λαψ αλρεαδψ υπον τηεμ αωαψ ιν Λακεδαιμον, τηε βελοϛεδ λανδ οφ τηειρ φατηερσ.920 Τηε ρεστ Ι κνοω, ανδ ξουλδ ιν ορδερ ναμε; Αλλ ϛαλιαντ ξηιεφσ, ανδ μεν οφ μιγητψ φαμε. Ψετ τωο αρε ωαντινγ οφ τηε νυμερουσ τραιν, Ωηομ λονγ μψ εψεσ ηαϛε σουγητ, βυτ σουγητ ιν ϛαιν· Ξαστορ ανδ Πολλυχ, φιρστ ιν μαρτιαλ φορξε, Ονε βολδ ον φοοτ, ανδ ονε ρενοων’δ φορ ηορσε. Μψ βροτηερσ τηεσε; τηε σαμε ουρ νατιϛε σηορε, Ονε ηουσε ξονταιν’δ υσ, ασ ονε μοτηερ βορε. Περηαπσ τηε ξηιεφσ, φρομ ωαρλικε τοιλσ ατ εασε, Φορ δισταντ Τροψ ρεφυσεδ το σαιλ τηε σεασ; Περηαπσ τηειρ σωορδσ σομε νοβλερ θυαρρελ δραωσ, Ασηαμεδ το ξομβατ ιν τηειρ σιστερ’σ ξαυσε." Σο σποκε τηε φαιρ, νορ κνεω ηερ βροτηερσ’ δοομ; Ωραπτ ιν τηε ξολδ εμβραξεσ οφ τηε τομβ; Αδορν’δ ωιτη ηονορσ ιν τηειρ νατιϛε σηορε, Σιλεντ τηεψ σλεπτ, ανδ ηεαρδ οφ ωαρσ νο μορε.930 Ξλεαρλψ τηε ρεστ Ι βεηολδ οφ τηε δαρκ–εψ’δ σονσ οφ Αξηαια; Κνοων το με ωελλ αρε τηε φαξεσ οφ αλλ; τηειρ ναμεσ Ι ρεμεμβερ; Τωο, τωο ονλψ ρεμαιν, ωηομ Ι σεε νοτ αμονγ τηε ξομμανδερσ, Καστορ, φλεετ ιν τηε ξαρ––Πολψδευξεσ, βραϛε ωιτη τηε ξεστυσ–– Οων δεαρ βρετηρεν οφ μινε––ονε παρεντ λοϛεδ υσ ασ ινφαντσ. Αρε τηεψ νοτ ηερε ιν τηε ηοστ, φρομ τηε σηορεσ οφ λοϛ’δ Λακεδαιμον? Ορ, τηο’ τηεψ ξαμε ωιτη τηε ρεστ οφ τηε σηιπσ τηατ βουνδ τηρο’ τηε ωατερσ, Δαρε τηεψ νοτ εντερ τηε φιγητ ορ σταρ ιν τηε ξουνξιλ οφ Ηεροεσ, Αλλ φορ τηε φεαρ οφ τηε σηαμε ανδ τηε ταυντσ μψ ξριμε ηασ αωακεν’δ?    Σο σαιδ σηε;––τηεψ λονγ σινξε ιν Εαρτη’σ σοφτ αρμσ ωερε ρεποσινγ, Τηερε, ιν τηειρ οων δεαρ λανδ, τηειρ Φατηερ–λανδ, Λακεδαιμον. 940 Ανδ νοω Ι σεε τηεμ αλλ, τηε φιερψ–εψδ Αξηαεανσ, Ι κνοω τηεμ αλλ βψ ηεαρτ, ανδ Ι ξουλδ τελλ τηειρ ναμεσ... βυτ τωο Ι ξαννοτ φινδ, ανδ τηεψ’ρε ξαπταινσ οφ τηε αρμιεσ, Ξαστορ βρεακερ οφ ηορσεσ ανδ τηε ηαρδψ βοχερ Πολψδευξεσ. Μψ βλοοδ βροτηερσ. Μοτηερ βορε τηεμ βοτη. Περηαπσ τηεψ νεϛερ ξροσσεδ οϛερ φρομ Λαξεδαεμον’σ λοϛελψ ηιλλσ ορ ξομε τηεψ διδ, σαιλινγ ηερε ιν τηε δεεπ–σεα σηιπσ, βυτ νοω τηεψ ρεφυσε το ςοιν τηε μεν ιν βαττλε, δρεαδινγ τηε σξορν, τηε ξυρσεσ ηυρλεδ ατ με..." Σο σηε ωαϛερεδ, βυτ τηε εαρτη αλρεαδψ ηελδ τηεμ φαστ, λονγ δεαδ ιν τηε λιφε–γιϛινγ εαρτη οφ Λαξεδαεμον, τηε δεαρ λανδ οφ τηειρ φατηερσ.950 Ι σεε, μορεοϛερ, μανψ οτηερ Αξηαεανσ ωηοσε ναμεσ Ιξουλδ τελλ ψου, βυτ τηερε αρε τωο ωηομ Ι ξαν νοωηερε φινδ, Ξαστορ,βρεακερ οφ ηορσεσ, ανδ Πολλυχ τηε μιγητψ βοχερ; τηεψ αρε ξηιλδρενοφ μψ μοτηερ, ανδ οων βροτηερσ το μψσελφ. Ειτηερ τηεψ ηαϛε νοτ λεφτΛαξεδαεμον, ορ ελσε, τηουγη τηεψ ηαϛε βρουγητ τηειρ σηιπσ, τηεψ ωιλλνοτ σηοω τηεμσελϛεσ ιν βαττλε φορ τηε σηαμε ανδ δισγραξε τηατ Ι ηαϛεβρουγητ υπον τηεμ." Σηε κνεω νοτ τηατ βοτη τηεσε ηεροεσ ωερε αλρεαδψ λψινγ υνδερ τηε εαρτηιν τηειρ οων λανδ οφ Λαξεδαεμον.
by Elucubrator
Wed May 21, 2003 12:30 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: Harry Potter in our favorite languages
Replies: 47
Views: 33602

Re:Harry Potter in our favorite languages

I used to have Asterix Gallus (the Latin one) and 'Asteri/kioj e0n 'Olumpi/a| (the one in Ancient Greek), until they were stolen from me. :'(<br /><br />-S.
by Elucubrator
Tue May 20, 2003 11:55 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation Help Wanted!
Replies: 5
Views: 6673

Text for a ring

Here is a possible solution that might prove an elegant ornament to the wedding band: <br /><br /><br /> (tu) lumen, tu mihi amores, a!, mundusque mihi es tu <br /> <br /><br />What I have tried to do, since the text is going to be engraved on a wedding band, is to create a text that runs back into ...
by Elucubrator
Tue May 20, 2003 11:04 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Translation Help Wanted!
Replies: 5
Views: 6673

Re:Translation Help Wanted!

[quote author=adz000 link=board=3;threadid=107;start=0#549 date=1053383140] In any case we wouldn't want to call her our "mundus", by etymology our pit, unless we were already imagining divorce proceedings,<br />[/quote]<br />[size=18=12]ωηερε ιν τηε [i]μυνδυς[/i] διδ ψου φινδ τηατ τηε ωορδ "μυνδυς" βψ ετψμολογψ ις "πιτ"? ιτ ις νοτηινγ οφ τηε σορτ; ιτ ις ξογνατε ωιτη σανσκριτ "μυνδ" (πυριφιξαρἰ ανδ ηας ονλψ ξοννοτατιονς οφ ορναμεντ, πυριτψ, ανδ ελεγανξε ιν ιτς οριγιναλ μεανινγ. ιν λατερ ξηυρξη λατιν ιτ αξθυιρες τηε δουβλε μεανινγ ας ιτ’ς εθυιvαλεντ γρεεκ ωορδ κόσμος, ωηιξη ηας τηε σενσε οφ "ορναμεντ" ανδ αλσο μεανς "υνιvερσε".ι δον’τ σεε ηοω ανψονε ξαν σηοω τηατ ιτ ις ρελατεδ το ανψ ωορδ φορ "πιτ". ωηερε διδ ψου ρεαδ τηις? ??? δισαβυσε με οφ μψ ιγνορανξε ορ αδμιτ δεφεατ ανδ πυτ ιτ ιν τηε ξλεαρ.αμιξαβλψ,σεβαστιαν ·) <br /><br />PD By the way, I think that Mr. or Miss "Slide", as the case may be is long gone and will not return. Whoever it was did not leave an email address for contact, does not check personal messages on the Textkit site, and did not respond to earlier posts in this thread which have been since removed.<br /><br />At any rate, I think I have an elegant solution to the problem, whether Slide returns or not that I'll post in another message, to which others may comment.<br /><br />-S.
by Elucubrator
Tue May 20, 2003 10:06 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Lexicons
Replies: 11
Views: 8088

Re:Lexicons

This is too great a topic not to throw in my two drachmas worth. Having read all the previous posts I'll just make a few brief statements on the books that have been mentioned with which I have some experience.<br /><br />(1) The Great Scott (LSJ) [/u]: I am a graduate student of Classics and I mayb...
by Elucubrator
Thu May 15, 2003 5:47 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Conversation & Correspondence in Greek/Latin
Replies: 8
Views: 9097

Re:Conversation & Correspondence in Greek/Latin

Hi Erica, lucky for you real Latin doesn't write the accents, so you don't need them fro Latin, but I know that on a Mac if you want to put an accent above a letter you hit option + e together and the next letter you type will get an acute accent. Holding option down with the letter "u" will give yo...
by Elucubrator
Wed May 14, 2003 2:30 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: IE-Linguistics Question - spurious diphthongs
Replies: 3
Views: 5580

Re:IE-Linguistics Question - spurious diphthongs

[size=18=12]ηι ωιλλιαμ, ι ωαντ το κνοω βεξαυσε ι ωαντ το κνοω ηοω τηε ανξιεντ γρεεκ λανγυαγε σουνδεδ ας μυξη ας ποσσιβλε, ας μυξη ας ωε ξαν δετερμινε, ιν τηε διφφερεντ περιοδς ανδ διαλεξτς. ω. σιδνεψ αλλεν ηας δονε αν εχξελλεντ σοβ ιν ηις βοοκ [u]Vοχ γραεξα[/u] ανδ ηε ινξλυδες α ξηαρτ τηατ ινδιξατες τηε ξηανγες ιν προνυνξιατιον οφ τηε vοωελς τηρουγη τιμε, βυτ τηε ματτερ οφ τηε σπυριους ανδ γενυινε διπητηονγς ις σομετηινγ ι ξαν’τ φινδ μυξη ινφορματιον ον. ι ηαvε ρεαδ τηις παρτ ιν σιηλερ ανδ ιν αλλεν’ς [u]Vοχ γραεξα[/u] βυτ φρομ νειτηερ αμ ι αβλε το δετερμινε ωηερε τηε ξηανγες τακε πλαξε. ι τηινκ ι διδ ρεαδ τηατ εvεντυαλλψ τηε προνυνξιατιον οφ τηε σπυριους διπητηονγ ανδ τηε διγραπη φορ λονγ επσιλον φελλ τογετηερ, βυτ τηε ορτηογραπηψ φορ βοτη ηαδ αλωαψς βεεν τηε σαμε· ει.ι τηινκ ιτ ωας ρατηερ τηε φαξτ τηατ τηε ορτηογραπηψ λοοκεδ τηε σαμε τηατ εvεντυαλλψ ξαυσεδ προνυνξιατιον οφ τηε τωο το αππροχιματε ονε ανοτηερ ανδ εvεντυαλλψ ενδ ιν τηε σαμε σουνδ, ρατηερ τηαν τηατ τηε σουνδς ηαvινγ ξομε το βε τηε σαμε, ωερε συβσεθυεντλψ ωριττεν ιν τηε σαμε μαννερ. βυτ, τηε βοοκς ι μεντιονεδ αβοvε ι ηαvε νοτ ρεαδ ιν τωο ψεαρς, ανδ περηαπς ι νεεδ το γιvε τηεμ ανοτηερ γλανξε.ωηψ ωουλδ ιτ βε ας διφφιξυλτ ας ψου σαψ? φορ εχαμπλε, ωε κνοω τηατ ιν πείθω τηε διπητηονγ ις ρεαλ βεξαυσε ωε ξαν ωορκ ιτ τηρουγη τηε σουνδ μιλλ ανδ ωε κνοω τηε ιοτα ις ρεαλλψ τηερε. ιν τηε φυτυρε τενσε πείσομαι φρομ τηε vερβ πείθω ις προνουνξεδ "πεψ‐σο‐μαι", ας τηε διπτηονγ ις ρεαλ. ηοωεvερ, τηε φυτυρε οφ τηε vερβ πάσχω λοοκς ιδεντιξαλ το τηε φυτυρε οφ τηε vερβ πείθω, ναμελψ πείσομαι βυτ ιτ ηας ιν φαξτ α διφφερεντ προνυνξιατιον, ναμελψ, "πεεη‐σο‐μαι".ηοω δο ωε κνοω τηις? φιρστ οφ αλλ, ιτ ις ιμπορταντ το ρεμεμβερ τηατ τηε τερμ [i]σπυριους διπτηονγ[/i] ονλψ τελλσ υσ τηατ ιτ’σ νοτ ρεαλλψ α διπητηονγ, βυτ δοεσν’τ τελλ υσ αβουτ ωηατ τηε σουνδ βεηινδ τηε ορτηογραπηψ ισ. Ωηατ ωε αρε ρεαλλψ ταλκινγ αβουτ ισ τηε λενγτηενινγ οφ αν επσιλον ορ αν ομιξρον. Τηισ λενγτηενινγ οφ τηε σηορτ ϛοωελσ μαψ ρεσυλτ φρομ ονε οφ τωο ρεασονσ· 910[u][b]ξοντραξτιον[/u][/b] οφ ε+ε. φορ εχαμπλε ιν τηε ξοντραξτ vερβ ποιέω·ποιε + ετε = ποιεῖτε νο διπητηονγ, βυτ λονγ επσιλον (ιφ ωε μαψ ξαλλ ιτ τηατ.) (2) [u][b]ξομπενσατορψ λενγτηενινγ[/u][/b]. τηις ις ωηεν α λεττερ φαλλς ουτ οφ α ωορδ ανδ τηε vοωελ ις λενγτηενεδ το ξομπενσατε φορ ωηατ ωας λοστ. φορ εχαμπλε, ιν τηε φυτυρε οφ τηε vερβ πάσχω, ωηιξη ωε ωερε δισξυσσινγ αβοvε. τηε ινδο‐ευροπεαν φορμ ις·[b]πεντη‐ς‐ο‐μαι[/b]. φρομ τηις τηε ξονσοναντ ξλυστερ [b]‐ντη‐[/b] δροπς ουτ, ανδ ωε αρε λεφτ ωιτη [b]πε‐σο‐μαι[/b]. τηε [b]ε[/b] ιν [b]πε‐[/b] ωιλλ λενγτηεν το ξομπενσατε φορ τηε λοσς οφ τηε ξονσοναντς ανδ γιvες υς [b]πεεη‐σο‐μαι[/b]. ιν γρεεκ πείσομαι. αγαιν τηειρ ις νο διπητηονγισατιον, βυτ α λονγ επσιλον.ι ωας συρπρισεδ το φινδ vερψ στραιγητφορωαρδ ινφορματιον ον ηοω το δετερμινε ωηετηερ α διπητηονγ ις σπυριους ορ γενυινε ιν γοοδωιν’ς [u]γρεεκ γραμμαρ[/u], σεξτιον 8, ωηιξη Ι ηερε δεξομπρεσσ ανδ τρανσξριβε·\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\[b]8.[/b] τηε διπητηονγς ει ανδ ου αρε ειτηερ [i]γενυινε[/i] ορ [i]σπυριους[/i]. [b]γενυινε[/b] ει, ου ειτηερ βελονγ το τηε εαρλιεστ στρυξτυρε οφ τηε λανγυαγε, ας ιν πείθω, [i]περσυαδε[/i] (ξφ. ιτς περφεξτ πέποιθἀ, ορ αρισε φρομ ξοντραξτιον οφ ε+ι, ας ιν γένε‐ι, γένει [i]βψ βιρτη[/i] (232). [b]σπυριους[/b] ει ανδ ου αρισε φρομ ξοντραξτιον οφ ε+ε ανδ ε+ο, ο+ε, ορ ο+ο, ασ ιν ἐποίει φορ 9ἐποίεἐ [i]ηε μαδε[/i], ἐποίουν φορ 9ἐποίεον [i]τηεψ μαδε[/i]; ορ φρομ ξομπενσατιvε λενγτηενινγ ([b]32[/b]), ας ιν τιθείς (φορ τιθεντ‐ς, [b] 0[/b]) [i] πλαξινγ[/i], τούς (φορ τόν‐ς, [b]75[/b]), τηε αξξυσατιvε πλυραλ οφ τηε αρτιξλε.ιν τηε φουρτη ξεντυρψ β.ξ. τηε σπυριους διπητηονγς ωερε ωριττεν λικε γενυινε ει ανδ ου (τηατ ις, ει, οὐ; βυτ ιν εαρλιερ τιμες τηεψ ωερε ωριττεν ε ανδ ο. σεε [b]28[/b].————————————————————————τηις αλλ μακες ιτ σεεμ λικε ιτ ωουλδ βε ποσσιβλε το δετερμινε ωηετηερ α διπητηονγ ις γενυινε ιν α vερβ ορ νοτ, βψ λοοκινγ ατ τηε αβλαυτ (τηε διφφερεντ vοωελ γραδες ιν τηε φορμς οφ ιτ’ς πρινξιπαλ παρτς.) ανδ το ιντερπρετ α διπητηονγ ας γενυινε ανψωηερε τηατ αν ιοτα ις παρτ οφ α ξοντραξτιον. οφ ξουρσε, το ρεπροδυξε τηις κινδ οφ αξξυραξψ ιν ρεαδινγ γρεεκ, ιτ ις νεξεσσαρψ το κνοω τηε ωορδς ιν αδvανξε. ανδ τηατ ις ωηψ ι αμ προποσινγ τηε ξονστρυξτιον οφ α λιστ οφ γρεεκ ωορδς ωιτη γενυινε διπητηονγς.ιτ συστ οξξυρρεδ το με τηατ λείπω ις ανοτηερ vερβ ωηερε τηε διπητηονγ ις γενυινε, ας ιτς περφεξτ ις λέλοιπα. τηις δοεσν’τ σεεμ λικε ιτ ωιλλ βε σο ηαρδ, ρεαλλψ. ωηατ δο ψου τηινκ? λετ’ς κεεπ τραξκ οφ τηεμ.σινξερελψ,J. σεβαστιαν παγανι<br />
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 6:32 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Help Requested:- "Aperto"
Replies: 4
Views: 4885

Re:Help Requested:- "Aperto"

I think Vincent's translation here is so far the most accurate. These seem to be instructions for the reader to tell him how to carry out an experiment. The only thing still missing in our attempts to translate this accurately is the fact that the verb "introducatur" is a subjunctive and should be t...
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 6:17 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin Thesaurus
Replies: 3
Views: 5996

Re:Latin Thesaurus

Yes, but is it available for download anywhere online, and do you know the URL?<br /><br />Grrrrr! >:(<br />Please, read the threads carefully before replying. <br /><br />-S.
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 6:05 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: little translation
Replies: 1
Views: 3314

Re:little translation

eius (rei) annos venturos meminero.<br /><br /><br />the verb "to remember" in Latin is defective and appears only in the perfect system. The perfect is used for the present tense, the pluperfect for past tense, and the future perfect for (logically) future tense. The verb governs a genitive of the ...
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 5:38 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: question about nouns
Replies: 4
Views: 5092

Feminine dat./abl. alternative pl. endings

Very nice detail, benissimus. One could, I suppose, make the distinction in these cases where a feminine first declension and a masculine second declension noun differ only in their endings (not in their stems). I looked it up in Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar to find out more of the detail...
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 5:04 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: NEED URGENT TRANSLATION
Replies: 6
Views: 7115

Re:NEED URGENT TRANSLATION

[quote author=benissimus link=board=3;threadid=60;start=0#465 date=1052720522]<br />Simply "Unitas vires" or "Unitas est vires". There is such a wealth of options though. This has a sense of <br />"Oneness is strength"<br />[/quote]<br /><br />I don't think this works in Latin. Can you find vires , ...
by Elucubrator
Tue May 13, 2003 4:53 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Collection of Latin words
Replies: 6
Views: 7008

Re:Collection of Latin words

Nice renderings. It was pointed out by Vincent earlier in the thread that "terperantia" is just a mispelling for "temperantia".<br /><br />-S.
by Elucubrator
Mon May 12, 2003 11:42 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: oedipus rex
Replies: 7
Views: 3551

Re:oedipus rex

Jeff has one in the queue. Maybe if you ask him he'll bump it up there and scan it after Herodotus and the Latin stuff. :) <br /><br />
by Elucubrator
Mon May 12, 2003 3:52 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Rant against Wheelock's Latin
Replies: 68
Views: 74620

Wheelock II: the Jeremiad continues

I got curious after my last post and went to my closet to find my 3rd edition copy of Wheelock, where it has lain condemned to the darkness, and I opened it up to see where how the book culminates.<br /><br /> Wheelock has included readings at the end, in two groups. The first on is called Loci Anti...
by Elucubrator
Mon May 12, 2003 2:14 am
Forum: Wheelock's Latin
Topic: Rant against Wheelock's Latin
Replies: 68
Views: 74620

Wasted Moments ;-)

Most of the comments regarding the newest edition of Wheelock were not of my own invention; they are the comments of university professors teaching beginning Latin to undergraduate students. When I first wanted to learn Latin, like you I bought Wheelock. It isn't that I did not have learning Latin w...
by Elucubrator
Sun May 11, 2003 3:10 pm
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Anticipating Greek boards: converting names
Replies: 3
Views: 4941

Re:Anticipating Greek boards: converting names

I like [size=18=12] γουλιέλμος. You could also write it with an additional iota to give you the sound of that digamma: [size=18=12] γουιλιέλμος. <br /><br />But what's wrong with bringing back the digamma? It would be rare and cool! Come on! Dare to be a real Ionian! You might end up starting a new fad with everyone writing the digamma in their respective names: two options I can think of:<br /><br /> (1) [size=18=12]γvιλιέλμος, or<br /><br /> (2) [size=18=12]Vιλιέλμος.<br /><br />You could also consider writing all four of these variants with a double lambda, and also playing around with how the sound and orthography changes if you use an u-psilon in place of the -ou- digraph. Try them all and pick which one sounds the best to you. <br /><br />Let us know which one it is.<br /><br />-[size=18=12] 9Ϝάν. 8)<br /><br />PD I just noticed that the lower case digamma in beta code doesn't come out like a digamma at all, but like an ugly version of a final sigma. Do you know what the correct key stroke for the lowercase digamma is?<br />
by Elucubrator
Fri May 09, 2003 10:53 pm
Forum: Open Board
Topic: For new members
Replies: 19
Views: 17136

Re:For new members

Astronomy and Sea Kayaking! WOW!<br />That's really cool, Indy!<br /><br />-S.
by Elucubrator
Fri May 09, 2003 10:33 pm
Forum: Learning Latin
Topic: Latin-English date translation help?
Replies: 3
Views: 4388

Re:Latin-English date translation help?

[quote author=JGarrison link=board=3;threadid=104;start=0#428 date=1052498241]<br />I know this probably isn't written the "correct" way, but does it still make sense? 11 of June, 2002?<br /><br />UNDECIMO IUNIUS MXII<br />[/quote]<br /><br />no, it's entirely wrong, you barbarian! Here we measure t...
by Elucubrator
Thu May 08, 2003 1:23 am
Forum: Open Board
Topic: For new members
Replies: 19
Views: 17136

Hello Ah Lang

Hi Ah-Lang, <br /><br />I am in Toronto, Canada, the 2nd SARS Capital of the world. It's too bad your classes got cancelled. So, you're studying internet architecture, but I see that you are not in a design/art/architecture department but in "Electronic Engineering" and since I don't know anything a...
by Elucubrator
Thu May 08, 2003 12:21 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: IE-Linguistics Question - spurious diphthongs
Replies: 3
Views: 5580

IE-Linguistics Question - spurious diphthongs

I hope that everyone realises (but I know you do not) that what most textbooks call the Greek diphthong [size=150] ει is in truth rarely a real diphthong (i.e. meant to be pronounced as -ey- in English "hey"). Most of the time the two letter are a digraph, a combination of two letters used to represent a single sound. In English an example of a digraph is the pair "ch" which represents only one sound (e.g. "church"). <br /><br /> In Greek, the digraph [size=150] ει represents a long "epsilon", that is, the sound of an epsilon when it is held in pronunciation for the same amount of time as a long vowel, without admitting any i-sound at all (this is not the same quality of sound as the letter [size=150] η ). To pronounce the [size=150] ει digraph correctly you must not allow your tongue to move at all while you are pronouncing "eeehhh". Hold it in place to keep from allowing the digraph to become a diphthong.<br /><br /> At this point most people will want to know how you can tell when [size=150] ει is a diphthong, and when it is'nt, since in print they look exactly the same, and indeed you can not tell by looking at the word, but it may be determined by analysing the morphology of words. It is less often a diphthong than it is a digraph, and if we can learn to spot the places where it is a diphthong, it would be better to assume that everywhere else it is the digraph. <br /><br /> These digraphs are sometimes called spurious diphthongs, which means they look like a diphthong but really aren't. Such an one is the present infinitive active ending [size=150] ‐ειν . In this verb form the ending is produced by a contraction of two epsilons, namely, the thematic vowel of the conjugation plus the infinitive ending, viz. [size=150] ε +[size=150] ‐εν =[size=150] ‐ειν . There was never an iota sound to begin with, and neither is there once the vowels have contracted.<br /><br /> One example where the diphthong is real is the[size=150] ει in the verb[size=150] πείθω which is accordingly pronounced "peyt-haaw" ("aw" as in English "saw"). The endings of the aorist optative passive are also real diphthongs, as are some of the optatives in the conjugations of the contract verbs. It's good to keep these points in mind.<br /><br /> What I would like to find if anybody knows of the existence of such a thing, is a list of words where [size=150] ει is in fact a diphthong. If it is something that has never been put together, I was wondering whether we might not keep a growing list in this thread as we discover them. Can anyone help with this? <br /><br />Sebastian<br /><br />
by Elucubrator
Wed May 07, 2003 1:25 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Greek text
Replies: 26
Views: 30513

Yellow Belt

I think that for working all that out on my own I now deserve the yellow belt of Geekhood! ;D
by Elucubrator
Wed May 07, 2003 1:03 am
Forum: Learning Greek
Topic: Greek text
Replies: 26
Views: 30513

Spionic Font Trouble

I've installed the SPIonic fount on my computer and didn't realise it for a while but today it struck me that on some of the posts I was actually reading Greek, in Greek letters!!! :o How this works I don't know, but does it mean that if I type with the keystrokes indicated on the "SPIonic fount read me" that the rest of you will be able to see it as Greek text in Greek letters? <br /><br />I'm not exactly sure how all thes YAbbC stuff works either but I'm going to experiment, let me know if I got it right.<br /><br />[size=150] Ποικιλόθρον’ ἀθάνατ’ ’Αφρόδιτα, παῖ Δίος δολόπλοκε, λίσσομαί σε, μή μ’ ἄσαισι μήδ’ ὀνίαισι δάμνα, πότνια, θῦμον.<br /><br />Ok, I think I have it figured out now, except for the fact that I had to produce the smooth breathing before the "A" in [size=150] ’αφρόδιτα with the "single quote" key that is used to mark an elision. None of the codes for Smooth breathing, i.e. "0" or ")", placed either before or after the "A" gave me the right position for the breathing.<br /><br />What am I doing wrong? Or do you guys just use the "single quote" here as well?<br /><br /><br />-S.<br /><br />PD. Size was 3, Font was Spionic, and with its veil torn off here is the beast exposed:<br /><br /> Poikilo/qron' a0qa/nat' 'Afro/dita,<br /> pai= Di/oj dolo/ploke, li/ssomai/ se,<br /> mh/ m' a1saisi mh/d' o0ni/aisi da/mna,<br /> po/tnia, qu=mon.<br /><br />PPD If you are seing the same above as you are below, you need to go to the following page and download the SPIonic font, it's available there for both Macintosh machines and IBM compatibles. There is a "read me" file as well which shows you the right keystrokes for the Greek to come out.<br /><br /> http://rosetta.reltech.org/TC/fonts/