Plato’s Apology of Socrates and Crito in Greek

This 247 page Greek language book presents the Apology and Crito in Greek with excellent line notes below the Greek text and a 47 page Greek to English dictionary. It also includes extracts from the Phaedo and Symposium and Xenophon’s Memorabilia.

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8 Responses to Plato’s Apology of Socrates and Crito in Greek

  1. Zerg says:

    Why the hell do you want my email? Can’t I just download the damn file without you gathering info about me?

    • Jeff Tirey says:

      If you had been more polite, I would have emailed a download link to you. I do this frequently.

      We’re hosted on a WordPress platform, a platform that hosts about 10% of all websites world-wide. We don’t really need your email but you do need email to create an account. We ask for our users to create accounts because it’s the only solid way to prevent bots, scanners and scrapers from constantly downloading our 800MB library. Since we’re moving as much as we can to a content-delivery network, we have to keep bandwidth costs under control. Hope that explains things and since it looks like you’re posting with a fake email address, I’m not really writing so much to you but to others who might have a similar question. It was a fair question – but sadly expressed in a rude way.

  2. ivan peter james wavell says:

    where can I find latin textbook with key that the exercises are translated and is truly comprehensive, and also a comprehensive ancient greek list of verbs as well as of nouns fully conjugated and declined?

    • Brandon Wells says:

      I don’t know of any such Latin book but I know someone who has stated that he is working on an answer key to Moreland and Fleischer’s awesome “Latin: An Intensive Course” and will post it for free download when it is finished (not on this site but on his own I guess).

      As for the greek verbs, you can download Smyth’s Greek Grammar from this site and print out his huge verb list as a handy reference in your notebook (assuming you use one). I’ve found it meets most of my needs. If you want more than that there’s a book called ‘All the Greek Verbs’ which lists every conjugated form that appears in extant classical literature. Can’t remember author’s name, but the title is on Amazon. Most textbooks contain full paradigms of the nouns. If your’s does not get Hansen and Quinn’s “Greek: An Intensive Course”. That book has more charts than any other I’ve seen (at least they take up more pages).

  3. Dave says:

    Thank you!

  4. Simeon says:

    just awesome! thank you so much for this book!

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