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greek for everyday stuff

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greek for everyday stuff

Postby marian » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:45 am

I find it helpful when learning a language to try to think how I would say everything that goes through my head in the language and in fact to try to think in the language when I am on my own. I am now learning Greek, and I find there are often things that I don't know how to express in Greek and that I can't find in Woodhouse, even though they don't have to do with modern technology or anything. For instance, even something as simple as "good night" escapes me. But there is a lot more. Stuff that is very basic but that you might not find in narrative texts. Does anyone know any good resources for finding out how the Greeks said these things? One book that looks like it would be helpful for one particular issue is "Greek Forms of Address" by Eleanor Dickey. Unfortunately, that book is just about forms of address.
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Re: greek for everyday stuff

Postby annis » Tue Jan 31, 2012 1:06 am

This isn't fully translated, but you might find it a useful start: Greek Phrase Book.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Re: greek for everyday stuff

Postby marian » Fri Feb 03, 2012 12:26 pm

Thanks! This looks like a good resource that I had overlooked. I wonder how many people are using either the English translation or the German original.
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Re: greek for everyday stuff

Postby Markos » Fri Feb 03, 2012 4:19 pm

I find it helpful when learning a language to try to think how I would say everything that goes through my head in the language and in fact to try to think in the language when I am on my own.


καλόν ἐστιν τὸν τῆς Ἑλληνικῆς γλώσσης μαθητὴν ποιῆσαι.

even something as simple as "good night" escapes me.


καλὴ νύξ, φίλτατε!

{
I find it helpful when learning a language to try to think how I would say everything that goes through my head in the language and in fact to try to think in the language when I am on my own.


This is an excellent thing for the student of Ancient Greek to do.

even something as simple as "good night" escapes me.


καλὴ νύξ, φίλτατε! }
I am writing in Ancient Greek not because I know Greek well, but because I hope that it will improve my fluency in reading. I got the idea for this from Adrianus over on the Latin forum here at Textkit.
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Re: greek for everyday stuff

Postby Damoetas » Fri Feb 17, 2012 5:42 am

This thread is a few weeks old, but I thought I would chip in anyway.

Yes, marian, I share your concern: I've often wished I had a resource that would help me to think in Greek (or Latin) about my everyday life. The Greek Phrase Book that others have suggested is very helpful, but I think you'll find that it doesn't meet all your needs. There are, however, two things that you can do:

1) Keep reading lots of Greek, especially things that deal with everyday life and colloquial language (like Aristophanes, or Lucian). Anytime you come across something that you might conceivably want to say, make a mental note of it. Pretty soon, a situation will arise in which you can think it to yourself!

2) Any time you want to say something to yourself in Greek but don't know the words, don't worry about it: focus on what you can say. For instance, you don't know the specific verb, but you know what tense and mood it would be in; so imagine what the ending would be. Or, think of something else that you could say about the situation, and say that to yourself. It's kind of like when you're in a foreign country and you don't know the language well, so you can't say everything that you would want to say; but if someone is trying to talk to you, you have to say something! So just think of any old thing, and say it to yourself in Greek. Then later, when you're reading Aristophanes and you find that someone actually does say that, you'll be really thrilled. Or, you'll learn what you should have said - and you can say it next time :)
Dic mihi, Damoeta, 'cuium pecus' anne Latinum?
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