Textkit Logo

Pronunciation of δεω in πηληιαδεω (Iliad line 1...)

Are you reading Homeric Greek? Whether you are a total beginner or an advanced Homerist, here you can meet kindred spirits. Beside Homer, use this board for all things early Greek poetry.

Pronunciation of δεω in πηληιαδεω (Iliad line 1...)

Postby brookter » Sat Nov 14, 2009 2:07 pm

Hi,

I think I understand the principle of sinizesis (paragraph 586), which dictates that the εω in πηληλιαδεω should be pronounced as a single long syllable. However, I'm not clear how it actually should be pronounced - εω doesn't seem to be one of the diphthongs listed and any other way of pronouncing seems to involve two vowels (however quickly one of them is pronounced) so it's not actually a single syllable at all. Is the ε just forgotten - or is there a specific pronunciation not mentioned in the text?

I know I'm missing something and I suspect it's really obvious...

Many thanks

David
brookter
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 2:20 pm
Location: Deva

Re: Pronunciation of δεω in πηληιαδεω (Iliad line 1...)

Postby oberon » Sun Nov 15, 2009 2:11 am

Remember that a) we don't really know how things were pronounced (for example, eta's are often prounced like "aye" but probably were more like a short "e" as in bet) an b) the meter can change normal pronunciation:

MEnin a-AYde theA pe; LE-i-a-dEO (pronounced eh-oh really fast) a-khilE-OS.
oberon
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:31 pm

Re: Pronunciation of δεω in πηληιαδεω (Iliad line 1...)

Postby brookter » Sun Nov 15, 2009 6:19 am

OK - thanks very much for the reply.

David
brookter
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 2:20 pm
Location: Deva

Re: Pronunciation of δεω in πηληιαδεω (Iliad line 1...)

Postby Anthony Appleyard » Thu Jun 02, 2011 9:39 pm

I have seen a theory that originally this word was πηληϝιαδᾱ' elided for πηληϝιαδᾱo ; the next word was Ἀχιλῆϝος .

Pronunciation was likely: short ε close like French é ; η long open like English "air" (but without an r-component), or like the 'e' in 'pet' but drawled.
User avatar
Anthony Appleyard
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 72
Joined: Mon May 23, 2011 12:43 pm


Return to Homeric Greek and Early Greek Poetry

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests