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Latin For Beginners, section 318 probably mental block.

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Latin For Beginners, section 318 probably mental block.

Postby Episcopus » Mon Oct 27, 2003 8:12 pm

I've had this a few times, when I just am confused by a sentence and then I usually find an embarrassingly simple solution. It's probably the same with this. The others, even English to Latin, I found very easy as usual (methinks I may be able to faire Greek soon) However I am ashamed of my nonsense attempt at this so I am just going to ask:

1. Barbari proelium committere statuerunt eo magis quod Romani infirmi esse videbantur.

I know all the words but can't figure out why a comparison would be here.

Something like 'the savages decided to join battle more by this because the Romans were said to be weak...' but that does not make sense to me.

Thanks in advance, we need more threads like this! Hell I'm finishing this course I am no quitter loser some random claimer.
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Postby phil » Mon Oct 27, 2003 10:53 pm

OK, I'm not afraid to show that I still don't know Latin. Is 'eo' meaning 'there' in this sentence?
The savages decided to join battle there, more because the Romans seemed to be weak.
Maybe the comparison is that they chose the reason of the Romans appearing weak rather than any other reason for deciding to join the fray.
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Re: Latin For Beginners, section 318 probably mental block.

Postby benissimus » Mon Oct 27, 2003 11:24 pm

Well... choose your own wording, but this is what I get out of it:

Barbari proelium committere statuerunt eo magis quod Romani infirmi esse videbantur.

The barbarians decided to engage (in) battle with him instead ("to a greater extent") because the Romans seemed to be weak.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
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Postby Magistra » Tue Oct 28, 2003 12:13 am

eo magis

According to Casell's, Cicero has used this phrase with the meaning of "so much the more" or "all the more". That seems to fit in this context.

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Postby Episcopus » Tue Oct 28, 2003 5:54 pm

Dr. D'Ooge can be a sly bugger sometimes, flopping out a Cicero in my face.

Thanks :wink:
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