Textkit Logo

Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby Pros » Fri Apr 10, 2009 3:39 am

While working my way through Lingua Latina on my own I had some questionable translations in Chapter 6 and would like some feedback if I am wrong.

Medus Romam vocatur ab amica sua, quae femina est pulchra et proba.(6.79)
Medus is called to Rome by his girlfriend, who is a beautiful and good woman.

Itaque is fessus non est et laetus cantat:(6.80)
Therefore he is not tired and happy sings:
or.....Therefore he is not tired and glad, he sings:

"Salve, mea Lydia! Ecce amicus tuus qui solus Romam ad te venit."(6.89)
Hi, my Lydia! Look your friend who alone comes to Rome to you."

Thanks for any criticism,
Pros
phpbb
Pros
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:43 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby thesaurus » Fri Apr 10, 2009 5:19 am

Itaque is fessus non est et laetus cantat:(6.80)
Therefore he is not tired and happy sings:
or.....Therefore he is not tired and glad, he sings:


Your translation is correct, but it might help to know that adjectives like "laetus" here can be translated more easily into English as adverbs, "he sings gladly."

The rest looks good, too.

Versio tua recta mihi videtur, sed fortasse iuvabit scire adiectiva sicut "laetus" hîc etiam Anglicè adverbis facile verti posse, e.g. "he sings gladly" pro "laetus cantat."

Reliqua quoque mihi bona videntur.
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
thesaurus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 989
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 9:44 pm

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby svaens » Sat Jan 22, 2011 3:06 am

Wasn't sure if I should post here, or make a new thread. But first i'll try here, as it is related (or at least, very near the sentence already asked about).

After the part of the sentence: "Itaque is fessus non est et laetus cantat:"

which I understand, there is a line which throws me:

"Non via longa est Romam, ubi amica habitat mea pulchra."

I can't work this one out.

Would I be correct in saying they use the form 'Romam' because it is 'to Rome' ?
So, first they say, "It is not a long way to Rome,"

and the rest, "ubi amica habitat mea pulchra"

would mean maybe something like "where lives my lovely friend".

Except, .... the word order is all over the place... how do I look at this ?
I mean, if I were to take notice of word order alone (which I know I can't do) I see "mea pulchra"
and I think it looks like "my beautiful" It is useless at this stage for me to go on speculating, because there is something about this sentence which I just don't understand...

Can anyone shed any light?

thanks,

sean
svaens
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Germany

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby thesaurus » Sat Jan 22, 2011 5:11 am

svaens wrote:"Non via longa est Romam, ubi amica habitat mea pulchra."

Would I be correct in saying they use the form 'Romam' because it is 'to Rome' ?
So, first they say, "It is not a long way to Rome,"

and the rest, "ubi amica habitat mea pulchra"

would mean maybe something like "where lives my lovely friend".


You've grasped it.

"It is is not a long road to Rome, where my beautiful friend lives."

Accusative forms of cities are used for direction to the city--no need for "ad". Similarly, if you see it in the ablative, that means "away from" the city.

The word order is mixed around, but always remember that word order in Latin doesn't determine grammatical function. "habitat" slipped in between "amica mea pulchra," but the words are still nominative singular feminine case--the adjectives still go with the nominative.

The subject still goes with the verb. The more you see this kind of thing, the easier it will get. Latin writers mostly use word order for emphasis and rhetorical reasons. Adding "mea pulchra" on the end is sort of a pleasant surprise, perhaps something like saying "that's where a friend lives... my beautiful one!"
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
thesaurus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 989
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 9:44 pm

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby Craig_Thomas » Sat Jan 22, 2011 5:39 am

It is significant that this particular line is sung. It is a line of poetry, not prose, and so its word order is partly determined by the rules of its meter, hexameter. In poetry it is very common, indeed so common that you might call it typical of poetic style, for a noun and its adjective (or adjectives) to be separated. Sometimes, as here, it is by a single word, but surprisingly often it is the entire remainder of the line of verse that intervenes, as in Martial I.iii: Aetherias, lascive, cupis volitare per auras, You want, impudent one, to fly about through the lofty heavens.
Craig_Thomas
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Aug 09, 2010 9:42 am

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby svaens » Sat Jan 22, 2011 11:59 am

You guys are great!
I really appreciate your help.
It will still take a little bit to shake my up-bringing with English, with word order being key.
But i'll get there. I look forward to it feeling more natural than it currently does.
More reading is the key, as you say!

sean
svaens
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 10:46 am
Location: Germany

Re: Lingua Latina Capitulum Sextum

Postby furrykef » Sat Jan 22, 2011 11:00 pm

Craig_Thomas wrote:but surprisingly often it is the entire remainder of the line of verse that intervenes, as in Martial I.iii: Aetherias, lascive, cupis volitare per auras, You want, impudent one, to fly about through the lofty heavens.

And sometimes an adjective starts one line and the noun doesn't come until all the way at the end of the next line. It can make one's head spin.
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.
I also have a lang-8 journal where I practice Spanish and Japanese.
User avatar
furrykef
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 365
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 am


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot] and 46 guests