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Laocoonta

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Laocoonta

Postby phil » Wed Oct 22, 2003 12:58 am

Wheelock introduces 'Laocoon, -ontis (m)' as the character in a story. However in the text, the form 'Laocoonta' appears. The -is genitive ending means that it is 3rd declension no? With endings in -em, -is, -i, -e, -es, -um and -ibus. So how can a masculine 3rd decl noun end in '-a'?
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Postby bingley » Wed Oct 22, 2003 3:15 am

Following Greek?
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Postby klewlis » Wed Oct 22, 2003 4:26 am

oh yeah, i guess that would make sense since the story's actually a homeric one... but i don't have the greek text handy to verify.
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Laocoonta

Postby Lisa » Wed Oct 22, 2003 5:15 pm

It's a Greek noun: see Allen & Greenough sections 81 through 83.

"Greek accusative" was always one of those answers it was fun to pull out of the hat back in the day.....

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Postby phil » Wed Oct 22, 2003 7:11 pm

Greek nouns? Klewlis, we haven't encountered them yet have we? Is that another chapter I slept through?
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Postby vinobrien » Wed Oct 22, 2003 7:58 pm

The so-called Greek declension crops up when a Latin writer is using a Greek name or loan word and is trying to look literary. It looks like a declension in Greek, the -a is an accusative if it comes from a third declesion word, but the declension in Latin is a mess and depends on the whim of the writer. The accusative of Aeneas can be Aeanan or Aeneam for example.
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Postby Emma_85 » Wed Oct 22, 2003 9:01 pm

This so-called Greek declension also happens to be one of the only Latin declension I'm good at :wink: . Well ok, the o and a aren't that bad, but everything else is just too confusing...
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Postby klewlis » Wed Oct 22, 2003 10:27 pm

phil wrote:Greek nouns? Klewlis, we haven't encountered them yet have we? Is that another chapter I slept through?


no, no, i doubt it's anywhere in our book. i just know that from my koine greek studies ;) lots of greek names are brought into latin, and vice versa.
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