Textkit Logo

you're welcome

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

you're welcome

Postby tadwelessar » Mon Oct 20, 2003 5:03 pm

Does anyone know how to say "you're welcome" in Latin?
Of course in the sense of
A:"Thanks"
B:"You're Welcome"

The odds are that form isn't in any text we have however. :cry:
We can try to invent a form based on modern romance languages (i.e. Italian, Spanish and French). In this three languages we say:
- di niente / de nada / de rien
- non c'è di che / no hay de que / no french translation
I think we should work on the latter.
What do you think about that?
tadwelessar
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2003 4:51 pm
Location: Italy, Sardinia, Sassari

Postby Emma_85 » Mon Oct 20, 2003 9:28 pm

Hmm... no I don't. Maybe they didn't have such a thing, you don't in British English.
phpbb
User avatar
Emma_85
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:01 pm
Location: London

Postby Episcopus » Mon Oct 20, 2003 9:34 pm

The british do say 'you're welcome', but amongst the youth of today it is usually used in a case such as this:

(Bill punches Cecil for no apparent reason.)

Bill: ahaaaaah!
Cecil: ugh...thanks...
Bill: You're welcome!
User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm

Postby Emma_85 » Mon Oct 20, 2003 9:40 pm

Yeah, but only because they were watching american TV series. Anyway you'd better ignore my posts today, as right now I'm drunk :P .
phpbb
User avatar
Emma_85
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:01 pm
Location: London

Postby Episcopus » Mon Oct 20, 2003 9:44 pm

:shock:

Are you a mother? And off it? And what the enfer are you talking of?
User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm

Postby Emma_85 » Mon Oct 20, 2003 9:59 pm

Who, me?
phpbb
User avatar
Emma_85
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:01 pm
Location: London

Postby vinobrien » Mon Oct 20, 2003 10:22 pm

If any Roman says "gratias ago tibi", you reply "nihil laboris est" or "aliud cura". Mind you, none of them has ever said thank you to me...
:shock:
User avatar
vinobrien
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 9:05 am
Location: Maidenhead, England

Postby bingley » Tue Oct 21, 2003 10:09 am

Did the Romans say anything in reply to gratias ago? Citation please. If they didn't, we don't need to translate 'you're welcome'.
bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Postby klewlis » Tue Oct 21, 2003 12:14 pm

bingley wrote:Did the Romans say anything in reply to gratias ago? Citation please. If they didn't, we don't need to translate 'you're welcome'.


- what if they did and we don't have any extant examples?
- what if we want to use phrases that they did not necessarily use?

:)
User avatar
klewlis
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1484
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2003 1:48 pm
Location: Edmonton, Canada

Postby tadwelessar » Tue Oct 21, 2003 1:02 pm

I'd like to reply to vinobrien.
how can you say the romans said "aliud cura" or "nihil laboris est"?
Last edited by tadwelessar on Wed Oct 22, 2003 8:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
tadwelessar
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2003 4:51 pm
Location: Italy, Sardinia, Sassari

Postby Episcopus » Tue Oct 21, 2003 3:18 pm

Yes "nihil laboris est" sounds sweet and has the "nichts zu danken" (i think) feel...or ça ne me fait rien... :)
User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm

Postby Emma_85 » Tue Oct 21, 2003 8:14 pm

Yes, the Germans to day 'nichts zu danken', but more often it's just 'bitte'.
phpbb
User avatar
Emma_85
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:01 pm
Location: London

Postby benissimus » Tue Oct 21, 2003 10:05 pm

klewlis wrote:
1 - what if they did and we don't have any extant examples?
2 - what if we want to use phrases that they did not necessarily use?

:)


1 - I find it hard to believe that a common figure of speech would not have survived in any of the remaining Latin texts, especially the personal letters, common plays, and dialogues.

2 - Yes, we do seem to do that a lot, don't we?
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby benissimus » Wed Oct 22, 2003 5:03 am

Ok, I found this in my idioms book:
aufer mihi ista

...it seems like the Romans were either very modest or else refused to accept thanks :P
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Postby vinobrien » Wed Oct 22, 2003 7:41 pm

In reply to doctissimo Tadwelessare, nihil laboris est is used by just about every conversational Latin guide but I can find no primary text so we can presume one or more of the following:
a. I have not read the entire corpus of Latin literature
b. it's somewhere in Erasmus
c. it's something medieval
c. it is the accepted neo-Latin phrase

For aliud cura, try Terence's Phormio

De. quid mihi dicent aut quam causam reperient? demiror.
Ge. atqui reperiam: aliud cura.

Now, was "binobrien" bad typing or wishful thinking?
User avatar
vinobrien
Textkit Member
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2002 9:05 am
Location: Maidenhead, England

Postby tadwelessar » Sat Oct 25, 2003 4:47 pm

sorry, bad typing, I'm going to correct it
tadwelessar
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2003 4:51 pm
Location: Italy, Sardinia, Sassari

Postby tadwelessar » Sun Oct 26, 2003 5:32 pm

I'm going to post a poll on this subject
tadwelessar
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 74
Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2003 4:51 pm
Location: Italy, Sardinia, Sassari

Re: you're welcome

Postby amans » Thu Jun 23, 2005 10:13 pm

tadwelessar wrote:The odds are that form isn't in any text we have however. :cry:
We can try to invent a form based on modern romance languages (i.e. Italian, Spanish and French). In this three languages we say:
- di niente / de nada / de rien
- non c'è di che / no hay de que / no french translation


Actually, you could say "il n'y a pas de quoi" in French.
amans
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Thu Sep 23, 2004 6:12 pm


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google Adsense [Bot], naturalphilosopher and 65 guests