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Sentence Translations

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Sentence Translations

Postby deus123 » Thu Nov 04, 2010 6:14 pm

Can someone please help me translate these sentences from Latin to English? I've included my own attempts, but please give your own answer (or say "right" or "correct" if your answer totally coincides with mine) - also, if I've mistranslated due to missing a grammatical error, please point that out as well. Literal translations would probably be better to enable me to understand where I've gone wrong.

    novem libros ferebat quos oracula deorum esse dicebat.
    She was bringing nine books which the oracle was saying to be of the Gods.

    consilium eorum semper petebatur ubi populus Romanus de periculo liberandus erat.
    His council were always being asked where the Roman people must be set free from danger.

    his deletis, Tarquinium rogavit num libros reliquos eodem pretio emere vellet.
    Once the books were destroyed, she asked Tarquinius whether he wanted to buy the remaining books at the same price.

    quod cum fecisset, placide rogavit num tres reliquos eodem pretio empturus esset.
    Because she had done this, she calmly asked whether he wanted to buy the three remaining at the same price.

    Tarquinius tandem, quod tantam constantiam non neglegendam esse intellexit, anui paruit.
    At last Tarquinius, because he understood such a great perseverance not to be neglected, obeyed the old woman.

    libros igitur tres emit non minore pretio quam pro omnibus primo petitum erat.
    And so he bought the three books without a smaller price than was first asked for all of them.

    et illa cum a rege discessisset postea numquam visa est.
    And when she/that woman had departed from the King, he never saw her afterwards.
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Re: Sentence Translations

Postby Kasper » Fri Nov 05, 2010 5:39 am

novem libros ferebat quos oracula deorum esse dicebat.
She was bringing nine books which the oracle was saying to be of the Gods.

She brought (was bringing) nine books, which she said were oracles (prophesies) of the gods.
- oracula = neuter plural, and can’t be the subject of dicebat

consilium eorum semper petebatur ubi populus Romanus de periculo liberandus erat.
His council were always being asked where the Roman people must be set free from danger.

Their counsel was always sought when (where) the roman people needed to be set free from danger.
- eorum = plural
- re “liberandus erat”, what you had was fine, and certainly literal.

his deletis, Tarquinium rogavit num libros reliquos eodem pretio emere vellet.
Once the books were destroyed, she asked Tarquinius whether he wanted to buy the remaining books at the same price.

Correct!

quod cum fecisset, placide rogavit num tres reliquos eodem pretio empturus esset.
Because she had done this, she calmly asked whether he wanted to buy the three remaining at the same price.


"when she had done this", or "when she had done which". The rest is good!


Tarquinius tandem, quod tantam constantiam non neglegendam esse intellexit, anui paruit.
At last Tarquinius, because he understood such a great perseverance [was] not to be neglected, obeyed the old woman.

For “anui paruit” I’d probably say ‘he gave into the old woman’, but ‘obeyed’ is not bad.

libros igitur tres emit non minore pretio quam pro omnibus primo petitum erat.
And so he bought the three books without a smaller price than was first asked for all of them.


Correct!

et illa cum a rege discessisset postea numquam visa est.
And when she/that woman had departed from the King, he never saw her afterwards.


And when she had departed from the king, she was never seen afterwards.
- visa est = passive

great job!
K
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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Re: Sentence Translations

Postby Craig_Thomas » Fri Nov 05, 2010 5:47 am

deus123 wrote:his deletis, Tarquinium rogavit num libros reliquos eodem pretio emere vellet.
Once the books were destroyed, she asked Tarquinius whether he wanted to buy the remaining books at the same price.

Often these passive ablative absolutes are best translated into the active.

After she destroyed them, she asked Tarquin if he'd like to buy the remaining books for the same price.

deus123 wrote:quod cum fecisset, placide rogavit num tres reliquos eodem pretio empturus esset.
Because she had done this, she calmly asked whether he wanted to buy the three remaining at the same price.

When she had done this, she calmly asked whether he would buy the remaining three for the same price.

deus123 wrote:libros igitur tres emit non minore pretio quam pro omnibus primo petitum erat.
And so he bought the three books without a smaller price than was first asked for all of them.

"Non minore pretio" is "for a not smaller price". For better English, you might have to say "for the same price" or "no less dearly" or somesuch. "Petitum erat" is pluperfect.

So he bought the three books for the same price that had first been asked for all of them.
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