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Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

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Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby pmda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:39 pm

Orberg uses the passive form of this verb to mean 'divide'. But so far as I can tell the active form means the same thing?

Magister: "In aequas partes pecuniam partiri oportet. Si vos sex asses aeque partimini, quot tibi sunt.'

He seems to be using it as a deponent verb - but I don't think it is?
Last edited by pmda on Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby furrykef » Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:07 pm

Whitaker's Words lists both a deponent and non-deponent version, but the non-deponent version is marked "lesser".
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Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby pmda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:41 pm

Furrykef. thanks. I take it 'lesser' means what it says - not much found. But does it mean exactly the same thing?
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Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby adrianus » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:49 pm

Yes, according to Lewis & Short and the Oxford Latin Dict.
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