Textkit Logo

Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.

Moderator: thesaurus

Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby pmda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 1:39 pm

Orberg uses the passive form of this verb to mean 'divide'. But so far as I can tell the active form means the same thing?

Magister: "In aequas partes pecuniam partiri oportet. Si vos sex asses aeque partimini, quot tibi sunt.'

He seems to be using it as a deponent verb - but I don't think it is?
Last edited by pmda on Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
pmda
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 1255
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 5:15 am

Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby furrykef » Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:07 pm

Whitaker's Words lists both a deponent and non-deponent version, but the non-deponent version is marked "lesser".
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.

Delirant isti romani!
User avatar
furrykef
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 370
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 am

Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby pmda » Sun Oct 03, 2010 2:41 pm

Furrykef. thanks. I take it 'lesser' means what it says - not much found. But does it mean exactly the same thing?
pmda
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 1255
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 5:15 am

Re: Passive vs. Active meaning of Partio

Postby adrianus » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:49 pm

Yes, according to Lewis & Short and the Oxford Latin Dict.
Ità certè, secundum L&S et OLD.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3270
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 9:45 pm


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: iacobusdu, Matthew Gendzwill, Yahoo [Bot] and 139 guests