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proficisci

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proficisci

Postby pmda » Thu Sep 16, 2010 7:06 pm

In Orberg's LLPSI he has:

Sine lacrimis Roma proficisci.

Does proficiscor always take the ablative when it has an object?
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Re: proficisci

Postby adrianus » Thu Sep 16, 2010 7:15 pm

Romam proficisci = to Rome
Româ proficisci = from Rome
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: proficisci

Postby pmda » Thu Sep 16, 2010 7:46 pm

Adrianus - thanks. I thought it only meant the same as abit..
Last edited by pmda on Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: proficisci

Postby thesaurus » Fri Sep 17, 2010 3:56 am

To elaborate, in the cases of cities, towns, small islands, domus (home), and rus (countryside), the accusative case is used alone to indicate movement to these destinations. So "domum eo" means "I go home." Conversely, the ablative case often has the sense of separation or movement away from.
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: proficisci

Postby Scribo » Sat Sep 18, 2010 10:01 am

thesaurus wrote:To elaborate, in the cases of cities, towns, small islands, domus (home), and rus (countryside), the accusative case is used alone to indicate movement to these destinations. So "domum eo" means "I go home." Conversely, the ablative case often has the sense of separation or movement away from.


Aye, often with a preposition if I recall correctly, more over you also get things like apud caesarem which means at the house of Caesar, right?

As for the seperation thing, I always remember it as being ab+lativus = something alongst the lines of "from the side"
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Re: proficisci

Postby Craig_Thomas » Sat Sep 18, 2010 11:22 pm

Scribo wrote:
thesaurus wrote:As for the seperation thing, I always remember it as being ab+lativus = something alongst the lines of "from the side"


That is a good mnemonic, but it's worth knowing - as you may already know - that "ablativus" is not related to the noun "latus" but comes from a passive form of the verb "aufero". It might be literally translated as "having-been-carried away" or simply as "removed". All the case names are formed this way, from the verbs "nomino", "accuso", "gigno/geno", "do", "voco", and "loco".
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