Textkit Logo

Casina question

Here's where you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get translation help and more!

Moderator: thesaurus

Casina question

Postby columbula » Sun Jul 04, 2010 1:27 pm

This is from the first like... 20 lines of Casina -- not even what Plautus wrote it doesn't seem. Hahh. I'm a terrible Latinist. @.@


Nos postquam populi rumore intelleximus
Studiose expetere uos Plautinas fabulas,
Antiquam eius edimus comoediam,
Quam uos probastis qui estis in senioribus:
Nam iuniorum qui sunt, non norunt, scio,
Verum ut cognoscant dabimus operam sedulo.


My... translation-esque thing?

After we realized through gossip of the people
that you eagerly await Plautine tales,
we published his old comedies,
which you who are of old age approve of:
On the other hand those of youth who are here, do not know, I know,
truly we will work hard so that you become familiar.

First, I'm taking the iuniorum as talking about the following qui. But I'm not sure if that's all that correct. Any thoughts here? :/

Also, mainly I have a question with the usage of scio here. What is the indirect statement of it? Because qui isn't accusative. I was even thinking the preceding vos could be the subject of the iuniorum, but that isn't accusative either. The following line seems to be a clause on its own and doesn't have the infinitive needed for indirect statement.

Thanks for any and all help~
Multas gratias vostri ago ob quod et omne auxillium (that's wrong too, probabilissme. )
columbula
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 1:25 pm

Re: Casina question

Postby furrykef » Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:53 pm

columbula wrote:First, I'm taking the iuniorum as talking about the following qui. But I'm not sure if that's all that correct.

Hmm, I don't see any reason why it wouldn't be.

Also, mainly I have a question with the usage of scio here. What is the indirect statement of it?

I think it's sort of standing on its own. "I know this: truly we will work hard..."

Finally, I would translate "non norunt" as "who have not become familiar [with Plautus]". Taken together, this seems to make perfect sense to me: "You young'uns who haven't gotten to know Plautus yet, well, I know this: we'll make sure to work hard to fix that!"

Who knows, it's possible that I'm wrong here, but so far it makes sense to me...
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.
I also have a lang-8 journal where I practice Spanish and Japanese.
User avatar
furrykef
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 365
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 am

Re: Casina question

Postby adrianus » Tue Jul 06, 2010 2:34 am

Salve columbula
"Antiquam eius edimus comoediam" non est hoc "we published his old comedies", sed hoc, ut opinor, "we are putting on [i.e., performing] a classic comedy of his"
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
adrianus
Textkit Zealot
 
Posts: 3270
Joined: Sun Sep 10, 2006 9:45 pm

Re: Casina question

Postby columbula » Tue Jul 06, 2010 5:55 am

My Latin teacher always said to us that nosco means to learn and when it's in the perfect tense it's meaning becomes "to know". But they basically have the same meaning anyway -- and using "to get to know" makes it sound a lot clearer.

I should've known better with "antiquam comoediam", because it's definitely singular. x.x

Ooh all of those help the passage make much more sense. Thanks so much for your help~! ^^
columbula
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 1:25 pm

Re: Casina question

Postby furrykef » Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:49 am

columbula wrote:My Latin teacher always said to us that nosco means to learn and when it's in the perfect tense it's meaning becomes "to know". But they basically have the same meaning anyway -- and using "to get to know" makes it sound a lot clearer.


"Nōscō" can mean both "learn" and "recognize", "be familiar with". "Cognōscō" is, apparently, completely synonymous, by the way. I wouldn't really say that they change meaning in the perfect tense; it's just the translation that changes in certain contexts. After all, if you know something, at some point you "have learned" it, right?
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.
I also have a lang-8 journal where I practice Spanish and Japanese.
User avatar
furrykef
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 365
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 am


Return to Learning Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Petrus, Qimmik and 41 guests