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Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

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Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby Quis ut Deus » Sat Jul 03, 2010 12:40 am

Salvete amici amicaeque!

Valeo si valent.

Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream?"

Scribo sic sententia mea:

"Discesserunt gelati edendi causa." (GERUNDIVE, anglice)

vel:

"Discesserunt ut gelatum ederent."

Gratias vobis ago!

Valete
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Re: Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby adrianus » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:39 am

Both are good, I believe, Quis ut Deus: your genitive gerundive with "causâ" or the one using the "ut" clause.
Uter modus, Quis ut Deus, bonus est, ut credo: iste per formulam cum gerundivo casu genetivo vel iste cum ut conjunctione.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby Quis ut Deus » Sat Jul 03, 2010 1:59 am

Salve Adriane!

Multas Gratias tibi ago!
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Re: Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby furrykef » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:00 am

You can also use the gerundive with "ad" (here I'm guessing the word is "gelātum"):
Discessērunt ad gelāta edenda.

And since this is a motion verb, you can even use the supine:
Discessērunt ēsum gelāta.

While the gerundive with "causā" is surely a valid construction, I'm not sure it is the best one. I understand "[gen. noun] + causā" to basically mean "for the sake of [noun]", and saying "They left for the sake of ice cream" sounds a bit odd. Wheelock doesn't use this construction where "for the sake of" would be awkward in English. Of course, that doesn't mean that the Romans didn't...

Where did you find the Latin word for ice cream, BTW? Or did you model it on Italian "gelato"?
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Re: Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby Quis ut Deus » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:13 am

@furrykef-Thanks for the input!

Yeah, I started with "helado" in Spanish, and then went with "gelatus" in Latin.
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Re: Quomodo dicere "They left to eat ice cream"

Postby adrianus » Sat Jul 03, 2010 10:54 am

Traupman (Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency) gives "gelidum crēmum" for icecream.
In Morgan, these (including your "gelatum"):
http://facweb.furman.edu/~dmorgan/lexicon/silva.htm wrote:.swet ice cream / Eiscreme: glacies (edibilis) -- Speiseeis: glacies edibilis; gelatum [Vox Lat.] (HELF.)
.swet ice cream / gelida sorbitio, sorbillum glaciatum (LRL); glacies edibilis (ALB. I)
.swet ice cream nix, cremor lactis gelu concretus (LEV.)

Pro anglicè "icecream" apud Traupman "gelidum crēmum" habes. Apud Morgan haec citata (quae gelatum tuum includunt).

furrykef wrote:"They left for the sake of ice cream" sounds a bit odd
Don't say that in English, then. Say "for the purpose of eating" or "to eat". See A&G §504b.
Sic anglicè non dicas sed aliter. Vide A&G sectionem quingentesimam quartam partem b.
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