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What determines the use of 'ea' as opposed to 'is'

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What determines the use of 'ea' as opposed to 'is'

Postby pmda » Mon Jun 21, 2010 12:32 pm

In chapter 10 Orberg's LLPSI he has the following sentence: 'Canis amicus hominis est, ea bestia fera non est.' I don't understand why he uses the feminine pronoun 'ea' to say that 'it' (the dog) is not a wild animal. I know that canis can be either masculine or feminine but here it's clearly masculine. Or is it agreeing with 'bestia' feminine? But why would it.....? It's not an adjective? But then that would mean that to say 'He (the man) is not a wild animal' you would write 'Ea bestia non est.' Can anyone explain this?
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Re: What determines the use of 'ea' as opposed to 'is'

Postby adrianus » Mon Jun 21, 2010 1:19 pm

See A&G, §296a
Vide illam grammaticam de A&G, sectio ducenti nonaginta sex pars a.
a. An adjective pronoun usually agrees with an appositive or predicate noun, if there be one, rather than with the word to which it refers (cf. § 306):—
hīc locus est ūnus quō perfugiant; hīc portus, haec arx, haec āra sociōrum ” (Verr. 5.126) , this is the only place to which they can flee for refuge; this is the haven, this the citadel, this the altar of the allies.
“rērum caput hōc erat, hīc fōns ” (Hor. Ep. 1.17.45) , this was the head of things, this the source.
eam sapientiam interpretantur quam adhūc mortālis nēmō est cōnsecūtus [for id...quod] ” (Lael. 18) , they explain that [thing] to be wisdom which no man ever yet attained.


The demonstrative pronoun "is ea id" is indeed an adjective there before "bestia""
"Ea" pronomen demonstrativum ante bestiae nomen illo loco adjectivum benè est:
A&G, sectio centum quadraginta sex, wrote:146. The Demonstrative Pronouns are used to point out or designate a person or thing for special attention, either with nouns as Adjectives or alone as Pronouns. They are:—hīc, this; is, ille , iste, that; with the Intensive ipse, self, and īdem, same;
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: What determines the use of 'ea' as opposed to 'is'

Postby pmda » Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:10 pm

Adrianus, Many thanks...
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