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Callimachus 75.30-31

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Callimachus 75.30-31

Postby vir litterarum » Tue May 25, 2010 11:47 pm

ὦ̣ Κ̣ή̣υξ, ἀλλ’ ἤν με θέλῃς συμφράδμονα θέσθαι,
..]ν.. τελευτήσεις ὅρκια θυγατέρος·
ἀργύρῳ οὐ μόλιβον γὰρ Ἀκόντιον, ἀλλὰ φαεινῷ
ἤλεκτρον χρυσῷ φημί σε μειξέμεναι.

These lines are a prophesy by Apollo to the father of Cydippe. I want these lines to mean something like, "For I say that Acontius will be mingled with you not as lead with silver, but as amber with gleaming gold." However, isn't μειξέμεναι the future active infinitive, and , if the preceding translation is correct, shouldn't σε be in the dative to correspond with ἀργύρῳ and χρυσῷ? If we do take μειξέμεναι as the future active infinitive, I don't understand with what the σε is being mixed.
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Re: Callimachus 75.30-31

Postby NateD26 » Wed May 26, 2010 5:41 am

[Edited my initial question, because I've found an answer in Smyth.]

I think that σε is the subject [indirect discourse], the father, and Acontius is the direct
object of the verb, with implied indirect object, Cydippe. Middle-liddell has μ. τί τινι,
to mix one thing with another.

"I say that you will join Acontius [with her] not as lead with silver, but as amber with gleaming gold."
Nate.
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Re: Callimachus 75.30-31

Postby vir litterarum » Wed May 26, 2010 12:35 pm

Your translation makes sense; it just seems strange to me that the indirect object would be omitted in this case.
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