Textkit Logo

Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Are you learning Latin with Wheelock's Latin 6th Edition? Here's where you can meet other learners using this textbook. Use this board to ask questions and post your work for feedback.

Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby Cathexis » Thu Mar 26, 2009 4:17 am

Here you go:

CHAPTER 32


Practice and Review (p. 220-21)
At first those three laughable men were able to endure bravely not even moderate things.
We especially asked how much help the seven women would bring and whether they would soon help us..
With the weapons finally having been gathered together, the commander promised that ten thousands of soldiers [= ten thousand soldiers] would depart very quickly.
You (pl.) wish to confer equal benefits, therefore, on all worthy men.
Let them better expose these evil things in order that they may not lose their own wealth and honors.
But, mind you, we wish to learn why his words were so harsh.
Since the others have learned about this plot, he/she wishes to go into exile as quickly as possible.
Do many pupils always display so great eagerness that they are able to read these sentences very easily in one year?
Although he/she had lost his/her wealth and did not have one as, nevertheless all citizens used especially to praise his/her talent and character.
We will certainly do more and better things by fair laws than by the sword.
Your (s.) eyes are more beautiful than the stars of the sky, my girl, and your kisses, sweeter than wine.
That [cursed] enemy, coming into Italy with many elephants, spent very many days in the mountains.
Visne/vultisne vivere diutius meliusque?
Vult loqui quam sapientissime ut sibi celerrime cedant.
His consiliis cognitis, rogavimus cur parare exercitum maxima cum cura non voluisset.
Ille, qui humillimus erat, divitias habere tam acriter nunc vult ut amittere duos amicos optimos velit.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sententiae Antiquae (pp. 220-21)
Opportunity is not easily offered but is easily lost.
You (s.) cannot live with us now any longer; we will not endure it.
Do you (s.) wish to live rightly? Who does not?.
You (s.) know more what must be done.
He/she told me truly what he/she wanted.
Equals are very easily gathered together with equals (Birds of a feather, etc.).
I love you (s.) more than my own eyes.
Men gladly believe that which they want.
Many things happen to a man which he wants and which he does not want.
We are able to contend and win by counsel better than by anger.
Each very good man prefers to do rather than to speak.
All wise men live happily, perfectly, fortunately.
They especially praise that man who is not moved by money.
If you (s.) want to know how there is no evil [nothing of evil] in poverty, compare a poor man and a rich man: a poor man laughs more often and more credibly.
Teachers give cookies to boys in order that they may want to learn the first elements.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Character of Cimon

Cimon quickly arrived at the highest honors. For he had enough eloquence, the highest liberality, great knowledge of laws and military science, because he had been with his father in armies from childhood. And so this man very easily held the urban population in his power and was very strong among the army in authority.

When that man had died, the Athenians grieved for him for a long time; not only in war, however, but also in peace they missed him gravely. For he was a man of so great liberality that, although he had many gardens, he never placed guards in them; for he wished that his gardens be open most freely in order that the people not be kept from these fruits. Often, moreover, when he saw some one less well dressed, he gave his cloak to him. He enriched very many men; he buried many poor dead men at his own expense. Thus it is least of all strange if, on account of the character of Cimon, his life was untroubled and his death was bitter to all.

(Nepos, Cimon)


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A Vacation...From You!
Do you seek what my farm in Nomentum returns in profit to me, Linus?
My farm returns this to me in profit: I do not see you, Linus!

(Martial 2.38)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Please...Don't!
You recite nothing and you, Mamercus, wish to seem a poet.
Be whatever you want, provided that you recite nothing.

(Martial 2.88)

==========================END=====================================

Enjoy!

Cathexis
Romani ite Domum
User avatar
Cathexis
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:04 pm

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby benissimus » Thu Mar 26, 2009 4:44 am

Ch 32 does not seem to be missing in an old version of the key that I was able to find, so here are my answers as well:

Chapter 32 discussion
PRACTICE AND REVIEW
1. At first, those three ridiculous men could not even bear moderate risk bravely and were not willing to offer any aid.
2. We especially asked how much help the seven women were bringing and whether they were hesitating or soon helping us.
3. At last, with the weapons brought together, the emperor promised that ten thousand soldiers would leave very quickly, so long as they received enough supplies.
4. You therefore prefer to bestow equal kindnesses unto all worthy men.
5. Let them better explain these bad things lest they lessen their wealth or lose their public offices.
6. But we wish to learn why he was so jealous and why his words were so harsh. explanation
7. Since the rest know these plots, he wants to secretly betake himself into exile as swiftly as possible so that he may avoid rumors and hatred.
8. Do many students always show so much zeal that they may be able to read these sentences very easily in one year?
9. Although he had lost his wealth and did not have one as, nevertheless all the citizens were especially praising his nature and character.
10. We shall certainly do more and better things with fair laws than with a sword.
11. Your eyes are more beautiful than the stars of the sky, my girl; you are slender and pretty, and your kisses too are sweeter than wine: let us love beneath the light of the moon.
12. That enemy, coming into Italy with many elephants, at first did not wish to fight and spent (very) many days in the mountains.
13. If your grandson invites you to dinner, he will fill up the table and offer you as much wine as you wish; but do not drink too much.
14. Uisne diutius atque melius uiuere?
15. Ille quam sapientissime uult dicere ut ei ipsi citissime cedant.
16. Cum haec nota consilia essent rogauimus cur noluisset maxima cum cura exercitum parare.
17. Iste qui erat humillimus nunc tam acriter diuitias habere uult ut uelit amicos amittere duos optimosque.

SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE
1. Opportunity is not easily provided but is easily and suddenly lost.
2. Now you cannot live with us any longer; do not stay; we will not bear it.
3. Do you wish to live properly? Who doesn’t?
4. You know more what must be done.
5. He told me truthfully what he wanted.
6. Equals with equals are gathered together (congregated) most easily.
7. I love you more than my own eyes.
8. Men easily believe what they want to.
9. Many things happen to men that they want and that they do not want.
10. With judgment, we can contend and win better than with anger.
11. Each best man is more willing to do than to speak.
12. All wise men live happily, completely, and fortunately.
13. They especially praise one who is not moved by money.
14. If you wish to know how there is nothing bad in poverty, compare a poor and a rich man: the poor man laughs more often and more genuinely.
15. Teachers give children cookies so they may be willing to learn the first basics.
16. If you wish to weep for me, first you should grieve for yourself. explanation
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae
User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
 
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby Cathexis » Thu Mar 26, 2009 3:58 pm

To my uneducated eyes,

The differences only enrich the language not confuse it.
If however one version is very right and the other very possibly not-right
I can only hope that there are *not* enough bottles of good "oinos" in the
world to settle it. :wink:
Romani ite Domum
User avatar
Cathexis
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:04 pm

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby Interaxus » Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:16 pm

You can download the missing Ch 32 answer key in pdf format from here:

http://www.badongo.com/file/14198750

NOTE: You have to wait 40 seconds or so before you can start downloading. Eventually the "Please wait..." button AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SCREEN changes to "Download Your File Here".

Cheers,
Int
Interaxus
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 510
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2004 1:04 am
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby Cathexis » Mon Apr 06, 2009 8:49 pm

Thank Goodness!

One more bottle of Retsina and I'd bust. :wink:

Cathexis
Romani ite Domum
User avatar
Cathexis
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:04 pm

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby Jordan St. Francis » Wed May 27, 2009 4:32 am

Thank you so much!! I just finished my first year of Latin and will be unable to take it again next term. This means I have to learn the last 10 chapters of the text on my own. This is great!
Jordan St. Francis
Textkit Neophyte
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 8:34 pm

Re: Wheelock's Answers : Chap 32 as promised

Postby furrykef » Wed May 05, 2010 3:02 am

Interaxus wrote:You can download the missing Ch 32 answer key in pdf format from here:

http://www.badongo.com/file/14198750


It says "This file has been deleted because it has been inactive for over 30 days" :/

I found another place to download it, but posting it is probably verboten anyhow.


I notice that some of the answers given in the first post are abridged and seem to have other issues I can nitpick...

At first those three laughable men were able to endure bravely not even moderate things.


You left out "et ūllum auxilium offerre nōlēbant", which I think would be "and did not want to offer help". Also, perhaps "perīcula" would be better as "dangers" rather than "things"?

We especially asked how much help the seven women would bring and whether they would soon help us.


You left out "dubitārent", which I presume is "were hesitating".

With the weapons finally having been gathered together, the commander promised that ten thousands of soldiers [= ten thousand soldiers] would depart very quickly.


You left out "dummodo satis cōpiārum reciperent", which I think is "provided that we receive enough supplies".

You (pl.) wish to confer equal benefits, therefore, on all worthy men.


Shouldn't "māvultis" be "prefer" or "wish more" rather than just "wish"?


I'd go on, but I notice now that Benissimus had already posted an alternative key, so I'm not sure there's really a point in doing so...


Benissimus hasn't provided alternative translations of the readings, however, so I'll also note these:

Cimon quickly arrived at the highest honors.


I think "honōrēs" probably means "public offices" here, given the context of what follows.

He enriched very many men; he buried many poor dead men at his own expense.


This sentence actually says, "He enriched many men; he helped many poor men [while] alive and buried them [when they were] dead at his own expense." (This is one of the tricky ones, so I verified this with the official key.)


Also, two issues with Benissimus's translations:

17. Iste qui erat humillimus nunc tam acriter diuitias habere uult ut uelit amicos amittere duos optimosque.


Is the "que" on "optimos" necessary? Yes, you're using two adjectives here, but I don't think it's necessary when one of them is a number.

16. If you wish to weep for me, first you should grieve for yourself.


I think both halves of this sentence are mistranslated. I think "for me" would be the dative here, or in any case, something other than the accusative. So the first half is "If you want me to weep." The second half is using the dative of agent (since this is the passive periphrastic), so it means "you yourself must grieve".
Founder of Learning Languages Through Video Games.
I also have a lang-8 journal where I practice Spanish and Japanese.
User avatar
furrykef
Textkit Enthusiast
 
Posts: 365
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:18 am


Return to Wheelock's Latin

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot] and 19 guests