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ut delectu rite acto

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ut delectu rite acto

Postby phil » Tue May 04, 2010 2:02 am

Manius Curius has sold a young man and his possessions for refusing the military draft. The man has complained to the tribune. Neque tribūnī plēbis adulēscentī auxiliō fuērunt; posteāque rēs in cōnsuētūdinem abiit, ut dēlēctū rīte āctō, quī mīlitiam dētractāret, in servitūtem vēnderētur.

And the tribunes were no help the the youth, and afterwards the deed passed into habit, something about the draft having been done properly, he who would shirk military duty would be sold into slavery.

I don't get the ut clause. I can't even work out if it's cause or result. Or is it neither?

Also, is the adulēscentī auxiliō a double dative?

Thanks for any help

Phil
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Re: ut delectu rite acto

Postby ptolemyauletes » Tue May 04, 2010 8:10 am

auxilio is in the dative case. It is what is commonly called a predicative dative. This is a dative that is commonly used with the verb to be or some type of verb of sending, choosing etc. If combined with a verb of sending, choosing etc. it is most often translated as an infinitive:
e.g.
nostros auxilio misit = He sent our men to help.

If it is used with the verb to be it can often still be translated with an infinitive, or simply as a noun, verb or adjective, depending on the context.
e.g.
magno periculo proelium nostris erat = The battle was very dangerous for our men.
haec pecunia mihi usui est. = This money is useful to me.
Lucius erat ludibrio magno amicis. = Lucius' friends made fun of him a great deal.
hoc consilium nostrae civitati exitio erat. = This plan was the ruin of our state.

adulescenti is also in the dative, but this is a more standard dative use.

I suspect that what you think is an ut clause is not... Remember that Latin will usually begin a clause then immediately interrupt it with subclauses that provide detail/circumstance about the main clause. English will more normally express this with seperate complete sentences.

The actual ut clause is 'ut in servitutem venderetur.' = that he was sold into slavery.
This is a type of result clause, dependent on the posteaque... abiit clause.
These are commonly called a substantive clause of result 'it came about that...'

This clause is interrupted by an ablative absolute, 'delectu rite acto', then by a clause of characteristic, in this case a causal clause, 'qui militiam detractaret.'

Nor were the Tribunes of any help to the young man; and afterwards the matter played out according to custom, that a draft was held properly, and since the young man refused miilitary service he was sold into slavery.

More literally: and afterwards the matter went according to custom, that, with a draft having been done rightly, since he refused military service, he was sold into slavery.

Hope this helps...
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Re: ut delectu rite acto

Postby phil » Thu May 06, 2010 11:19 pm

Thanks very much.

Phil
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