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Hello

Postby Aeneas » Sat Apr 03, 2010 11:12 am

Hello Everyone,
I just joined today, though I have visited the site sporadically over the past ten years perhaps. I studied Greek and Latin at university, and am now trying to regain it. I'd love to learn both, but am focusing on Greek --at least for now.

A quick question: Does anyone know of a scholarly online lexicon that gives not just translations of compound words but their etymologies also?
Best regards,
Aeneas
Aeneas
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Re: Hello

Postby Smythe » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:06 pm

Huh. I knew the answer, had the reply and the link all typed out, and then re-read your message - you want a GREEK lexicon, not a Latin one. Maybe posting in the 'Learning Greek' forums will net you a good answer, I'm not sure that most people peruse the Open Board.
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Re: Hello

Postby cb » Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:34 pm

hi, you can try the abridged bailly (which gives the etymology at the end of the articles):

http://home.scarlet.be/tabularium/bailly/index.html

or you can try chantraine's etymological dictionary, which shows the etymology in the other direction (i.e. it gives a base word and then lists the types of compound words built out of it):

http://www.archive.org/details/Dictionn ... gique-Grec

cheers :)
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