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Progress and next step

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Progress and next step

Postby Quis ut Deus » Fri Mar 12, 2010 3:38 pm

Salvete Omnes!

We'll I've been plugging away and it looks like my work is paying.

I can get through Nuntii Latini and Ephemeris pretty easily.

I can handle the Vulgate and a lot of medieval stuff.

I recently read some of Columbus' letters in Latin.

However, when I try to get to Tacitus, it's BRUTAL!!!!

Who's a good classical author to start with?

Any suggestions?

Valete amici!
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby adrianus » Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:00 pm

Start with Caesar, most would say, I imagine, Quis ut Deus.
Apud Caesarem incipias, Quis ut Deus, ut generaliter dicitur, imaginor.
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby ptolemyauletes » Sat Mar 13, 2010 12:40 pm

Yes, Caesar is the best to start with. Avoid Livy for a while, and definitely stay clear of Tacitus.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby Abstractus » Sat Mar 13, 2010 4:38 pm

Caesar is great, but if you find it still difficult, you may start from something bit easier.
Latin teachers sometimes recommend "Instiututiones" of Justinian. This is post-classical Latin, but hey, Justinian was still a Roman Emperor. :)
See page 297
http://books.google.com/books?id=wX_2Qxq5Xd4C

Also, have you read Historia Apollonii regis Tyri (very easy, from VI century), or some works of St. Augustine, especially Confessiones, or his commentaries to the Gospel of St. John? All these are good bridge from medieval to classical Latin.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby paulusnb » Sat Mar 13, 2010 6:43 pm

Eutropius is another traditional beginner text.
When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him. ~Swift
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby vastor » Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:05 am

paulusnb wrote:Eutropius is another traditional beginner text.

I often see the prepositional phrase ab urbe condita in the writings of historians, and although the meaning is clear, the grammar eludes me, for isn't condita a participle, used here for a purpose which is surely better suited to a gerund/gerundive, that is, as a verbal noun?. Assuming it is valid, Latin for beginners, from which I'm studying, states, and I quote: In each of these sentences the literal translation of the participle is given in parentheses. We note, however, that its proper translation usually requires a clause beginning with some conjunction (when, since, after, though, etc.), or a relative clause. Consider, in each case, what translation will best bring out the thought, and do not, as a rule, translate the participle literally. So does that mean the translation I often see used - From the founding of Rome [the city] is too literal and ultimately incorrect?
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby adrianus » Sun Mar 14, 2010 1:09 pm

"From the city having been founded" is too literal. "From the founding of the city" is the reworking of the phrase in English.

"From the founding of the city" est clausula in sermones anglicos facundiùs relata è sensu nimis nativo et proprio verborum "from the city having been founded".
I'm writing in Latin hoping for correction, and not because I'm confident in how I express myself. Latinè scribo ut ab omnibus corrigar, non quod confidenter me exprimam.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby Damoetas » Sun Mar 14, 2010 5:18 pm

This is a pretty common construction in Latin: where English would say, "{Before/after/from} the [verb]ing of [noun]," Latin can say, "{Before/after/from} [noun] [verb]ed." Grammars often call this "the ab urbe condita construction," from its most famous example. Here's another from Cicero:

Nam duo haec capita nata sunt post homines natos taeterrima et spurcissima, Dolabella et Antonius.
"For these two, Dolabella and Antonius, are the very blackest and foulest monsters that have ever lived since the birth of man." (Cic. Phil. 11.1, translation from Perseus).
Dic mihi, Damoeta, 'cuium pecus' anne Latinum?
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby vastor » Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:11 pm

Thanks for the explanations guys.
Gratias vobis, Adriano Damoetique ago.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby Imber Ranae » Mon Mar 15, 2010 7:12 pm

I've found most of Cicero's letters ad familiares to be quite manageable, and nothing like his orations.


vastor wrote:Gratias vobis, Adriano Damoetique ago.


Damoetae. 1st decl.
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby thesaurus » Mon Mar 15, 2010 8:09 pm

This is the edition of Caesar's Gallic Wars I started with that I recommend for someone in your shoes:

Haec editio Commentariorum De Bello Gallico a Caesare scripta primus liber erat mihi linguam latinam legere incipienti, itaque mihi mos est alicui idem facenti eam commendare

http://www.amazon.com/Lingua-Latina-Cae ... 025&sr=1-8

It's usefully and extensively annotated in Latin as part of the Lingua Latina series; it's intended to follow volume 1. The text is abridged but otherwise unedited. Most importantly, it's cheap!

Utiliter largèque annotatus Latinè hic cursûs Linguae Latinae est pars, quam Hans Orberg ordinavit ut primum cursûs volumen sequeretur. Liber adbreviatus est sed alioquin integer. Quod optimum, vilis est!
Horae quidem cedunt et dies et menses et anni, nec praeteritum tempus umquam revertitur nec quid sequatur sciri potest. Quod cuique temporis ad vivendum datur, eo debet esse contentus. --Cicero, De Senectute
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Re: Progress and next step

Postby Quis ut Deus » Tue Mar 16, 2010 12:51 pm

Gratias vobis ago, omnes!

Consilium bonum semper mihi dant.

Thesaure, legam librum quem mihi suades.

Paulusnb, legam quoque res Eutropii.

Abstracte, etiam legam "Institutiones."

Adriane, Caesarem legam.

Ignoscite inopiae meae Latinitatis.

Valete.
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