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Eureka ! Eureka !

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Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby sinhakumara » Fri Nov 06, 2009 7:01 am

Greetings gentlemen & ladies ! There was this Greek gentleman by the name of Archimides . Can someone break-up and translate the name ? Does the Arch come from Archios meaning ancient ? How should one best pronounce it - as Ark, or Arch or Arsh ?
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby Nooj » Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:01 pm

sinhakumara wrote:Greetings gentlemen & ladies ! There was this Greek gentleman by the name of Archimides . Can someone break-up and translate the name ? Does the Arch come from Archios meaning ancient ? How should one best pronounce it - as Ark, or Arch or Arsh ?
sinhakumara. :D


As for the pronounciation: Arkhimēdēs.

kh should be pronounced like an aspirated k. Put an emphasis on the first e when saying it.
Dolor poetas creat.
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby Essorant » Fri Nov 06, 2009 6:35 pm

In English that is toward "chief thinker" (archi-= "chief" + medes, related to medesthai "to think, to scheme".)

Looking in "The Dictionary of Indo-European Roots" that second part is related to many of the med- (medicus, meditari, mederi) and mod- (modus, moderari, modestia) words in Latin, and to English mete and meet (the adjective).
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby Scribo » Sat Nov 14, 2009 12:45 pm

ευρεκα - first person aorist active indicative. I have found.
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby modus.irrealis » Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:26 pm

Just a slight correction: εὕρηκα.
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby aloimonon » Sun Nov 15, 2009 5:55 pm

Also, is that not the first person perfect active indicative, and not the first person aorist active indicative? As far as I know, the first person aorist active indicative is εὗρον.
ἀλλ' ἔγωγε ἐξ αὐτῶν τούτων μᾶλλον αὐτὸν τεθαύμακα, ὅτι ἔν τε ἀλλοκότοις καὶ ἐν ἐξαισίοις πράγμασι αὐτός τε διεγένετο καὶ τὴν ἀρχὴν διεσώσατο. Dio LXXII 36.3
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby NateD26 » Sun Nov 15, 2009 6:58 pm

it's definitely the perfect indicative. the use of perfect in his case is fitting:
"I've found it and now i have the solution" as oppose to "I found it (but it could be that now I do not hold the solution anymore)".

Scribo may have put aorist for the perfect unintentionally.
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby Scribo » Sun Nov 15, 2009 7:33 pm

Yeah sorry, pretty new to greek and "I found" seems very aoristy, yeah looking at my book (Alpha to Omega) which has the full conjugation laid out Eureka behaves pretty oddly....
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby sinhakumara » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:09 am

as regards the pronounciation - does the X in Greek sound closer to "kh" as in sakhar (russian) or khuda (persian) ; or does it sound more like H as in hungry or hell ? Also do the Greek phonetics carry a universality through all its dialects ?
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Re: Eureka ! Eureka !

Postby oberon » Tue Nov 17, 2009 3:17 pm

sinhakumara wrote:as regards the pronounciation - does the X in Greek sound closer to "kh" as in sakhar (russian) or khuda (persian) ; or does it sound more like H as in hungry or hell ? Also do the Greek phonetics carry a universality through all its dialects ?
sinhakumara. :D


It is a "breathed" k sound (not an h). Many native english speakers can't hear the difference, and it is commonly pronounced simply as a hard "K" sound. There are (not including rho) three "breathed" letters: theta, chi, and phi. Generally, these are now pronounced "th" as in "then" or "thin," a hard K, and f. However, it is likely that the actual sounds were: theta= th in outhouse, phi=ph as in uphill, ect.
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