Out of Office message

Here you can discuss all things Latin. Use this board to ask questions about grammar, discuss learning strategies, get help with a difficult passage of Latin, and more.
Post Reply
User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 1:57 am

<br />Let's say I want to configure an "out of office" message in my email application that says something like:<br /><br />I'm out of the office until November 6. If you need assistance, please call Manderley at 256-512-1024.<br /><br />or<br /><br />Je ne suis pas au bureau jusqu'à jeudi 6 novembre. Si vous avez besoin d'assitance, veuillez téléphoner Manderley à (+1) 256-512-1024...<br /><br /><br />What would be the best way to phrase this? I've started forming a guess:<br /><br />A laborem ero adusque VI NOV MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut <at> II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br />

User avatar
benissimus
Global Moderator
Posts: 2733
Joined: Mon May 12, 2003 4:32 am
Location: Berkeley, California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by benissimus » Wed Oct 01, 2003 4:07 am

Hehe... there is that old saying "ex officio", but it has a different meaning than what you are looking for.
flebile nescio quid queritur lyra, flebile lingua murmurat exanimis, respondent flebile ripae

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:29 am

<br />How about "ex officina" or "ab officina"? I just looked up "office" in my dictionary and it gave me "officina". I didn't have a dictionary at work earlier, which is why I'm getting a second dictionary. I can't exactly shout to the crowd at work, "Hey, what's the Latin word for ___?"<br /><br />I'm not sure whether to use "ex" or "ab". Ab means away from. Ex means out of. So they both seem possible.<br /><br />Ex officina ero adusque VI NOV MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis. ???<br /><br /><br />

bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Out of Office message

Post by bingley » Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:52 am

How about absum + ablative for the away from part. Officina abero. Or rephrase as I will return to the office: in officinam redibo

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 7:16 am

<br />Adsum + Abl:<br />Adsum officina ero adusque VI NOV MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br />In officinam redibo:<br />In officinam VI NOV MMIII redibo. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br />Absum. I looked it up; it's covered in Unit 15. Is this how far you've gotten in M&F?<br /><br />Do I need something before the date to indicate the meaning of "on" a certain date?<br /><br /><br />

bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Out of Office message

Post by bingley » Wed Oct 01, 2003 7:34 am

No, I'm just about to start Unit 12. But I seem to remember there was a discussion about absum at the time I joined textkit.<br /><br />As far as I know, it's enough to put the date into the ablative to say when something happened/will happen.<br /><br />I can't remember now what 6th November would be in the Roman calendar. When were the nones in November?

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 7:40 am

<br />I thought the date would have to be Ablativized (is that a word?), but I couldn't figure out how to do that. :-\<br /><br />

bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Out of Office message

Post by bingley » Wed Oct 01, 2003 8:27 am

The calendar was umm difficult. There were three key dates, the calendae, the nones, and the ides (hence the Ides of March). If I remember correctly the calends were always the first of the month but the date of the nones or ides varied from month to month. Anyway to give the date you counted down to the next calendae, nones or ides. i.e., you said it was so many days to the calendae, nones, or ides. <br /><br />See: http://www.dl.ket.org/latin2/mores/cale ... lendar.htm

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 5:19 pm

<br />Well, that certainly does add a small wrinkle. I didn't know it was so complicated! I'll need some time to digest all this...<br /><br />Love the website. Now I know what to call all the days of the week. I wasn't sure what "Thursday" was in Latin.<br /><br />

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 6:49 pm

<br />I'm still tweaking the sentences... :)<br /><br /><br />http://www.wilkiecollins.demon.co.uk/roman/calco1.htm<br />This site shows than November 6th would be "A.D. VIII ID. NOV".<br />I'm starting to understand the "x days before the 13th". I would have made the 12th count as "1" day before the 13th. But they seem to count the 12th as "2" days before the 13th, thus the 5th ended up as "8" days before the 13th.<br /><br /><br />I guess the "Idus" part should be in the Accusative, thus idum.<br /><br />ante diem viii idum november.<br /><br />The site uses "septembres" as an example. Does this mean that November should be "novembres"? <br /><br /><br />Adsum + Abl:<br />Adsum officina ero adusque Diem Iovis ante diem VIII idum november MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br />In officinam redibo:<br />In officinam Diem Iovis ante diem VIII idum november MMIII redibo. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br /><br />

User avatar
Skylax
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 8:18 am
Location: Belgium

Re:Out of Office message

Post by Skylax » Wed Oct 01, 2003 7:15 pm

- Idus is a noun of the 4th decl in plural (Idus, Idus, Idus, Iduum, Idibus, Idibus)<br /><br />- For the Romans, the "1st" day "before" the Ides is the day of the Ides itself. The day before is called "PRIDIE IDUS" (with Idus in the Accusative, don't ask me why), and counted as the "2nd" day before the Ides, because the precedent day is called "the third".<br /><br />- November 6th is thus the "8th" day before the Ides (occuring November 13th).<br /><br />- The latin said ANTE DIEM OCTAVUM IDUS NOVEMBRES, what is not logical, instead of DIE OCTAVO ANTE IDUS NOVEMBRES<br />

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Wed Oct 01, 2003 7:32 pm

[quote author=Skylax link=board=3;threadid=754;start=0#7512 date=1065035754]<br />- The latin said ANTE DIEM OCTAVUM IDUS NOVEMBRES, what is not logical, instead of DIE OCTAVO ANTE IDUS NOVEMBRES[/quote]<br /><br />Are you saying that the phrase should be ABL (die octavo) instead of ACC (diem octavum)? Why?<br /><br />Why does Idus remain Idus instead of using the ACC? I'm confused... as usual. :-\<br /><br />What declension is "novembres" supposed to be? Is that a NOM singular, or NOM plural or ACC plural? I'm guessing that it's a 5th decl.<br /><br />For some strange reason, I thought Idus was 5th decl.<br /><br /><br />

bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Out of Office message

Post by bingley » Thu Oct 02, 2003 1:55 am

Adsum + Abl:<br />Adsum officina ero adusque Diem Iovis ante diem VIII idum november MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br />
<br /><br />No. absum. Better abero. Absum is a verb just like sum.<br /> <br />
<br />Quote from: Skylax on Today at 02:15:54am <br />- The latin said ANTE DIEM OCTAVUM IDUS NOVEMBRES, what is not logical, instead of DIE OCTAVO ANTE IDUS NOVEMBRES <br /><br /><br />Are you saying that the phrase should be ABL (die octavo) instead of ACC (diem octavum)? Why?
<br /><br />Ablative for time when (on the eighth day), accusative for time how long (for eight days).

Keesa
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:59 pm

Re:Out of Office message

Post by Keesa » Thu Oct 02, 2003 12:51 pm

Is this why you needed the phone numbers in Latin, Mariek? I believe I understand now...
phpbb

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Thu Oct 02, 2003 6:58 pm

[quote author=bingley link=board=3;threadid=754;start=0#7551 date=1065059708]<br />Ablative for time when (on the eighth day), accusative for time how long (for eight days).[/quote]<br /><br />Is this subtle difference covered later on in M&F?<br /><br />Oh, ABsum! Sorry I got that confused with ADsum. OK, here's what I've worked out as possible sentences. Is there anything else I should tweak to improve it?<br /><br />ABsum + Abl:<br />Absum officina ero adusque Diem Iovis ante diem octavum idus novembres MMIII. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br />In officinam redibo:<br />In officinam Diem Iovis ante diem octavum idus novembres MMIII redibo. Si auxilium requiritis, oro ut ad II-V-VI V-I-II I-0-II-IV Manderley vocetis.<br /><br /><br />

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Thu Oct 02, 2003 7:01 pm

[quote author=Keesa link=board=3;threadid=754;start=0#7571 date=1065099111]<br />Is this why you needed the phone numbers in Latin, Mariek? I believe I understand now...<br />[/quote]<br /><br />Yes, I was leading up to this question. It all makes sense now, eh? :)<br /><br />

User avatar
Skylax
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2003 8:18 am
Location: Belgium

Re:Out of Office message

Post by Skylax » Thu Oct 02, 2003 7:02 pm

[quote author=mariek link=board=3;threadid=754;start=0#7517 date=1065036779]<br /><br /><br />Are you saying that the phrase should be ABL (die octavo) instead of ACC (diem octavum)? Why?<br /><br /><br />Not exactly. I say that maybe in the beginning the phrase was DIE OCTAVO (ablative of time when) ANTE IDUS NOVEMBRES (Accusative after ANTE). But the Romans changed the phrase and the DIE OCTAVO went after ANTE, thus changing the case into Accusative (after ANTE + Acc), the hole phrase becoming an illogical but well understood one : ANTE DIEM OCTAVUM IDUS NOVEMBRES.<br /><br /><br />Why does Idus remain Idus instead of using the ACC? <br /><br />But IDUS is actually an Accusative (Acc plural 4th declension, ending -US [one more time])<br /><br /><br /><br />What declension is "novembres" supposed to be? Is that a NOM singular, or NOM plural or ACC plural? I'm guessing that it's a 5th decl.<br /><br /><br />NOVEMBRES is very much like the 3rd declension. See Allen & Greenough "Adjectives of the third Declension - Adjectives of three Terminations", § 115, page 49 [59] : NOVEMBER, NOVEMBRIS, NOVEMBRE is declined exactly like ACER, ACRIS, ACRE.<br />[/quote]

bingley
Textkit Enthusiast
Posts: 640
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2003 10:04 am
Location: Jakarta

Re:Out of Office message

Post by bingley » Fri Oct 03, 2003 5:01 am

Is this subtle difference covered later on in M&F?
<br /><br />Unit 7 (pg. 116)<br />

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Fri Oct 03, 2003 5:06 am

<br />Ah... so it should be ABL because we're expressing "when" rather than duration.<br /><br />I'm probably going to confuse the two until I reach Unit 7 ... at this rate, it'll be some time next year.<br /><br />

Keesa
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2003 10:59 pm

Re:Out of Office message

Post by Keesa » Fri Oct 03, 2003 11:30 pm

[quote author=mariek link=board=3;threadid=754;start=15#7609 date=1065121294]<br /><br />Yes, I was leading up to this question. It all makes sense now, eh? :)<br /><br /><br />[/quote]<br /><br />Yes, now it makes sense. I was quite curious about that.
phpbb

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Re:Out of Office message

Post by mariek » Sat Oct 04, 2003 5:13 am

<br />And now you know, and knowing is half the battle. :)<br /><br />(I guess G.I. Joe was before your time... :-\)<br />

MDS
Textkit Fan
Posts: 209
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2003 4:04 am
Location: Pickering, Ontario, Canada

Re:Out of Office message

Post by MDS » Sat Oct 04, 2003 5:47 am

LOL that was amusing Mariek!

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Post by mariek » Sat Dec 20, 2003 9:20 pm


I'm trying to see whether I still "get" this whole Roman Calendar thing. It still confuses me a bit. :?

If I wanted to say that I will return to the office on Monday December 29th, would this be correct?

In officinam diem lunae ante diem quartum kalendas Ianuarias MMIII redibo.

It was the "roll over" into January that got me here.

User avatar
mariek
Global Moderator
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 11:19 pm
Location: California
Contact:

Post by mariek » Sat Dec 20, 2003 9:43 pm


If I wanted to say that I will return to the office on Monday January 5th, would it be this?

In officinam diem lunae ante dium nonas Ianuarias MMIV redibo.


User avatar
Episcopus
Textkit Zealot
Posts: 2563
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 8:57 pm

Post by Episcopus » Sun Dec 21, 2003 2:52 pm

"On" when concerning time is rendered by the ablative of time when or within which without any preposition. I can't say that I've at all done anything to do with calendars but I can tell you that on the fifth day of the first month "quintó dié mensis primi" :? have a good time.

Post Reply