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Ch 30 PR #12

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Ch 30 PR #12

Postby RubyJewell » Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:58 pm

this is a prose comp question

the english is: Tell me in what land liberty is found.

Bennissimus's : "Dic mihi in quibus terris libertas inveniatur"

My translation : "Diceas mihi in quo patria libertas inveniat"

What did I do wrong?
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Re: Ch 30 PR #12

Postby spiphany » Mon Jun 15, 2009 9:42 pm

You need the imperative, not the second person of dico here. (Also, check your endings -- I think this would be 2nd person subj. if dico were 2nd (-eo) conjugation, but it is 3rd)

inveniat -- you need the passive here, not the active.

in quo patria / in quibus terris -- grammatically these are both correct. "Patria" tends to mean "fatherland" specifically, not "land/country" in general. Also, notice that Benissimus used the plural here, which is not technically what the English asks for.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)
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Re: Ch 30 PR #12

Postby Damoetas » Wed Jun 17, 2009 5:58 pm

Note also that patria is feminine, so if you want to use that word, the phrase should be in quā patriā. I think, however, that terra is better here, because patria has more the idea of one's "birthplace" or "native land." Terra is often used in the plural; see, for instance, Lewis & Short online:
http://artfl.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philo ... 2.lewshort
Dic mihi, Damoeta, 'cuium pecus' anne Latinum?
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Re: Ch 30 PR #12

Postby spiphany » Wed Jun 17, 2009 7:12 pm

Damoetas wrote:Terra is often used in the plural

Ah, I had a suspicion that might be the case (I know there are a number of other words where Latin uses the plural when English would use the singular), but didn't want to say anything along those lines without evidence.
IPHIGENIE: Kann uns zum Vaterland die Fremde werden?
ARKAS: Und dir ist fremd das Vaterland geworden.
IPHIGENIE: Das ist's, warum mein blutend Herz nicht heilt.
(Goethe, Iphigenie auf Tauris)
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Re: Ch 30 PR #12

Postby Einhard » Mon Jul 13, 2009 6:36 pm

RubyJewell wrote:this is a prose comp question

the english is: Tell me in what land liberty is found.

Bennissimus's : "Dic mihi in quibus terris libertas inveniatur"

My translation : "Diceas mihi in quo patria libertas inveniat"

What did I do wrong?



I don't know whether you meant to use "Diceas" as the present subjunctive, or if you just got mixed up, but if it's the former, then I think both you and Benissimus are correct. "Diceas" can be looked at as a jussive subjunctive, and thus "Let you tell me..."
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Re: Ch 30 PR #12

Postby Einhard » Mon Jul 13, 2009 6:40 pm

Ooops, I'm wrong. The 2.per.sing.pres.subj.act of "dicere" is actually "dicas", not "diceas". So your trnaslation wouldn't make sense as a jussive subjunctive.
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