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Could you please check this....... (is this beyond GCSE?)

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Could you please check this....... (is this beyond GCSE?)

Postby awlright » Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:37 pm

nemo praeter duos comites, viros audaces, cum Horatio nunc manebat. Ceteris pontem a
No one except the two companions, bold men, was now staying with Horatio. The rest
tergo ferro et igni delere iussis, periculum impetus cum his primo ferebat. Deinde, cum
back with the iron bridge and having been ordered to destroy the fire, these attacks
carried out first with danger. Then when
parva pars pontis maneret, comites in locum tutum abire coegit. Horatius, qui antea
staying on a small part of the bridge, the comrades in the safe place, were forced to leave. Horatius who
promiserat se urbem servaturum esse, in ponte solus contra multos stabat. Duces hostium
had before promised they would guard their city, was standing alone on the bridge against many. With the leaders guarded,
saevissime spectabat ut ad pugnam provocaret. Tot hostes iam interfecerat ut ceteri primo
he was hoping to challenge them to a fight. Now he had killed so many enemies that the rest were at first
progredi timerent. Sed tandem illi magno cum clamore tela in unum Romanum iecerunt.
afraid to advance. But finally with that great shout ,the Roman threw a missile into one.

Horatius magna virtue se scuto defendebat. Subito tamen, ponte tandem rupto, clamorem
Horatio was defending with his shield with great courage. Suddenly however, the bridge finally broke and he could hear their shout.
suorum audivit. Tum Horatius, multis vulneribus acceptis, deo fluminis precatus est.
Then Horatio, having received many wounds, was praying to the god of the river.
“Tiberne pater’ inquit ‘accipe hunc militem et haec arma flumine tuo.’ Deinde in aquam He said, "Father Tiberinus take these soldiers and these arms to your river. Then in the water,
desiluit armatus. Quamquam multa tela ab hostibus iaciebantur, ad alteram ripam tutus
the weapons fell down. Although many missiles were being thrown by the enemies he swam across to the other river with the weapons.
tranavit.
awlright
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Re: Could you please check this....... (is this beyond GCSE?)

Postby Imber Ranae » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:59 am

nemo praeter duos comites, viros audaces, cum Horatio nunc manebat. Ceteris pontem a

No one except the two companions, bold men, was now staying with Horatio. The rest


Looks good.

tergo ferro et igni delere iussis, periculum impetus cum his primo ferebat. Deinde, cum

back with the iron bridge and having been ordered to destroy the fire, these attacks
carried out first with danger. Then when


This needs some work. Ceteris...iussis is ablative absolute, pontem is direct object, a tergo means "behind" or "from the back", ferro et igni are both ablative of means. Ferrum "iron" is commonly metonymy for "sword".

Cum of course goes with his, "these men (i.e. Horatius and his two companions)", not periculum, which is accusative. The verb ferebat has 3rd person singular ending, so impetus must be singular.

parva pars pontis maneret, comites in locum tutum abire coegit. Horatius, qui antea

staying on a small part of the bridge, the comrades in the safe place, were forced to leave. Horatius who


Parva pars is nominative. Also, this is probably a concessive cum clause, so I'd translate it "although" rather than "when". Coegit is 3rd singular and active voice, so comites must be the accusative direct object. In + acc. means "into".

promiserat se urbem servaturum esse, in ponte solus contra multos stabat. Duces hostium

had before promised they would guard their city, was standing alone on the bridge against many. With the leaders guarded,


Se is reflexive and servaturum, which it agrees with, is singular. It also probably doesn't mean "guard" so much as "save" or "protect".

saevissime spectabat ut ad pugnam provocaret. Tot hostes iam interfecerat ut ceteri primo

he was hoping to challenge them to a fight. Now he had killed so many enemies that the rest were at first


I really don't know where you're getting a lot of this from. Spectabat has 3rd singular ending again, so the subject is implied and remains Horatius. It doesn't mean "guarded", and there's no reason to have "with" at the beginning of the sentence. Comites is accusative direct object and hostium is genitive plural of hostis. Saevissime is a superlative adverb. I don't know where you're getting "hoped" from either. Provocaret probably means just "provoke" here.

Next sentence looks fine.

progredi timerent. Sed tandem illi magno cum clamore tela in unum Romanum iecerunt.

afraid to advance. But finally with that great shout ,the Roman threw a missile into one.


Close, but iecerunt is 3rd person plural, so Romanum can't be the subject and goes with unum instead. Illi is nominative plural, so that's the only possibility. Tela is plural, too.

Horatius magna virtue se scuto defendebat. Subito tamen, ponte tandem rupto, clamorem

Horatio was defending with his shield with great courage. Suddenly however, the bridge finally broke and he could hear their shout.


First sentence is right. Ponte...rupto is ablative absolute. Translating it as a finite verb plus "and" is fine, but if this is a translation exercise your teacher/prof might prefer a more literal translation. That's up to you, though.

suorum audivit. Tum Horatius, multis vulneribus acceptis, deo fluminis precatus est.

Then Horatio, having received many wounds, was praying to the god of the river.


Remember, suorum is reflexive possessive. It's also genitive plural, so it does not modify clamorem directly as the subject's possession. Remember that the possessive pronouns are sometimes used in the masculine plural to mean "[whoever]'s men".

Next sentence is good, except that precatus est is perfect, not imperfect, so just "prayed".

“Tiberne pater’ inquit ‘accipe hunc militem et haec arma flumine tuo.’ Deinde in aquam

He said, "Father Tiberinus take these soldiers and these arms to your river. Then in the water,


Hunc militem is singular. Arma flumine is either ablative of means "with your river" or perhaps locative ablative "in your river". I'm not sure which the author means. In + acc. means "into".

desiluit armatus. Quamquam multa tela ab hostibus iaciebantur, ad alteram ripam tutus tranavit.

the weapons fell down. Although many missiles were being thrown by the enemies he swam across to the other river with the weapons.


Armatus doesn't mean "weapons" but "armored man". It's a substantive adjective. Desiluit means "jumped down". Ripam isn't "river" but "bank". Tutus "safe" is an adjective modifying the implied subject, but it's best to translate it here as an adverb: "safely". There's no "with your weapons".
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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Re: Could you please check this....... (is this beyond GCSE?)

Postby awlright » Tue Mar 17, 2009 5:40 pm

Slightly confused.....

Ceteris pontem a tergo ferro et igni delere iussis, periculum impetus cum his primo ferebat.
With the rest having been ordered to destroy from behind the bridge with iron and fire, the attack where these men were making, at first danger
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