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Latin translation. please check.

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Latin translation. please check.

Postby vik_man » Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:04 am

hi, i need to translate "free your mind" to latin

is "tuam libera mentem" correct?

thank you.
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby Slappo » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:07 pm

should be tui I think. Your mind is genetive use of you. Literally "The mind of you" = "your mind" since your is possessive here.

libera tui mentem (another appropriate word order would be mentem tui libera which places emphasis on freeing first and secondarily the mind)
Semper ubi sub ubi!
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby loqu » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:40 pm

That use of "tui" really puzzles me. Why not simply the possessive adjective, "tuam"?
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby petitor » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:58 pm

Hmm, I too believe "tuam mentem" is the correct form.

A possessive adjective (or any adjective for that matter) must agree with the noun it modifies. Since "mentem" is accusative, then it's adjective(s) must also be accusative. "tui" would apply only if the noun itself is genitive, as in "tui mentis". Compare with vir sui/tui generis - a man of his/your own kind. However, sententia tui me iuvat - the thought of you makes me happy vs. sententia tua me iuvat - your thought makes me happy.

nonne?
ignorantes latinam deo minore nati
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby paulusnb » Tue Feb 24, 2009 3:31 pm

Do not use tui. tua is the possessive adjective. It already means your.
When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him. ~Swift
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby Superavi » Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:06 pm

Can't "tuam" be dropped all together? The possession should be understood. I can see why one would want to emphasize it, but if you don't mean to emphasize then it can be dropped. Is the intended audience sing. or pl.?

I'm just beginning to get accustomed to Perseus. I ran a search on libero just for kicks, and one of the things it mentions is that libero is often used with the abl. I just can't figure out whether this would be that case (as I said I'm just starting to get used to the website). Hopefully one of our more advanced members can clarify that point.
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby Slappo » Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:20 pm

Err... I'm wrong... they are right, tuam is already possessive... sorry!
Semper ubi sub ubi!
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby Imber Ranae » Tue Feb 24, 2009 8:22 pm

Superavi wrote:Can't "tuam" be dropped all together? The possession should be understood. I can see why one would want to emphasize it, but if you don't mean to emphasize then it can be dropped. Is the intended audience sing. or pl.?

I'm just beginning to get accustomed to Perseus. I ran a search on libero just for kicks, and one of the things it mentions is that libero is often used with the abl. I just can't figure out whether this would be that case (as I said I'm just starting to get used to the website). Hopefully one of our more advanced members can clarify that point.


You could leave out tuam as implicit, but I think it should probably be included for the sake of clarity. Liberare, like many verbs and adjectives that imply separation, may take the ablative alone with the meaning of "from" or "of" in its separative sense. E.g. liberatus metu would mean "free of/from fear".
Ex mala malo
bono malo uesci
quam ex bona malo
malo malo malo.
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Re: Latin translation. please check.

Postby Kasper » Tue Feb 24, 2009 10:02 pm

I quite like 'libera mentem', without 'tuam' in a general statement like this, where no specific person or specific person's mind is referred to. It's ... punchy.
“Cum ego verbo utar,” Humpty Dumpty dixit voce contempta, “indicat illud quod optem – nec plus nec minus.”
“Est tamen rogatio” dixit Alice, “an efficere verba tot res indicare possis.”
“Rogatio est, “Humpty Dumpty responsit, “quae fiat magister – id cunctum est.”
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