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Translation Help Please

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Translation Help Please

Postby k.ideas » Fri Oct 03, 2008 12:43 am

Hi there,
I was looking for a bit of help with some translations. I really would appreciate any help that I can get.

1) Habetne animus tuus satis sapientiae?
Im having a lot of difficulties with this one
From my translation I get...
(Will it have) - (soul/mind) - you - (you *plural* satisfy) - (wisdoms)

--------------------------
2)Then they will save few fre men in our country

Is: Tum pauci liber viri in nostrum patriam servabunt correct?

------------------------

3) Therefore, the Roman people used to praise our good plans.

how would you say roman people? Romani?
Igitur, Romani nostrum bonum consilia laudabant.
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Re: Translation Help Please

Postby thesaurus » Fri Oct 03, 2008 1:43 am

k.ideas wrote:Hi there,
I was looking for a bit of help with some translations. I really would appreciate any help that I can get.

1) Habetne animus tuus satis sapientiae?
Im having a lot of difficulties with this one
From my translation I get...
(Will it have) - (soul/mind) - you - (you *plural* satisfy) - (wisdoms)

--------------------------
2)Then they will save few fre men in our country

Is: Tum pauci liber viri in nostrum patriam servabunt correct?

------------------------

3) Therefore, the Roman people used to praise our good plans.

how would you say roman people? Romani?
Igitur, Romani nostrum bonum consilia laudabant.


My versions:
1) "Does your soul have enough wisdom?" Or very literally, "does your soul have enough of wisdom." tuus is an adjective for 'animus'. Habet is in the present tense. Sapientiae is singular genitive (which looks the same as the nominative plural). 'satis' is a word that doesn't change form, but in this case it's funcitoning as the object. To have "enough of wisdom."

2) Tum paucos virorum liberorum in patriam nostram servabunt.
Here 'few' modifies a genitive, as in the English "give me a few of those". This is the same case in #1 with "sapientiae". Remember that 'free men' is the object, so accusative case. nostrum should match patriam in gender.

3) Igitur, populi romani bona consilia nostra laudabant.
Romani could mean "Romans" or you could use it as an adjective like I did. Remember to match cases and numbers: our good plans, all the words should be plural.
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Re: Translation Help Please

Postby calvinist » Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:17 am

thesaurus wrote: Remember to match cases and numbers: our good plans, all the words should be plural.

in other words, nostra bona consilia
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Postby vir litterarum » Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:06 am

Igitur is postpositive, so it must not be placed at the beginning of the sentence, i.e. Romani igitur bona consilia nostra laudabant.

in your second sentence, it would be stylistically preferable to omit "viros," for using an adjective such as "liberos" substantively with the gender indicating "men" is more in accordance with standard Latin prose.
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