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Plural of unus

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Plural of unus

Postby Boban » Fri Sep 26, 2008 10:30 pm

Does numeral unus have plural form?
For example, lets do declination of unus rex.
In plural is it unus reges?
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Postby Gonzalo » Fri Sep 26, 2008 10:41 pm

It would be duo reges.
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Boban » Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:58 pm

Gonzalo wrote:It would be duo reges.

Hm, I am not sure that I explained it well.

I don't know in english but in my native Serbian language there are different forms of "one king" and "one kings", actually "one" is not same in plural (original would be "jedan kralj" and "jedni kraljevi").
So, one has also plural forms, that's why I asked for latin.
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Postby modus.irrealis » Sat Sep 27, 2008 12:16 am

Yes, it does have plural forms. From Allen & Greenough's grammar:

It [unus] often has the meaning of same or only. The plural is used in this sense; but also, as a simple numeral, to agree with a plural noun of a singular meaning: as, ūna castra, one camp (cf. §137. b). The plural occurs also in the phrase ūnī et alterī, one party and the other (the ones and the others).


The plural forms are regular -- same as you'd get with magnus. So it would be uni reges (in the nominative).
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Postby Essorant » Sat Sep 27, 2008 3:42 am

<b>An</b> "one" in Old English was used sometimes in the plural as well, as in the Blickling Homily XV: Spel be Petrus & Paulus, where the plural means "alone"

<i>Þonne be þære lare mines lareowes þe þu me befrune, ne magan þær nænige oþre men onfon, butan þa <b>ane</b> þe mid clænum geleafan hie to þæm gegearwiaþ.</i>

"Then about the lore of my teacher that thou askedst me, there may not any other men receive [it], but those alone that with clean belief prepare themselves thereto."

In Modern English we sometimes use a plural <i>a</i> with the word few too, as in <i><b>a</b> few kings</i>.

<pre> </pre>
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Postby Gonzalo » Sat Sep 27, 2008 8:09 am

modus.irrealis wrote:Yes, it does have plural forms. From Allen & Greenough's grammar:

It [unus] often has the meaning of same or only. The plural is used in this sense; but also, as a simple numeral, to agree with a plural noun of a singular meaning: as, ūna castra, one camp (cf. §137. b). The plural occurs also in the phrase ūnī et alterī, one party and the other (the ones and the others).


The plural forms are regular -- same as you'd get with magnus. So it would be uni reges (in the nominative).

Thanks for the clarification.
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Boban » Sat Sep 27, 2008 2:46 pm

modus.irrealis wrote:Yes, it does have plural forms. From Allen & Greenough's grammar:

It [unus] often has the meaning of same or only. The plural is used in this sense; but also, as a simple numeral, to agree with a plural noun of a singular meaning: as, ūna castra, one camp (cf. §137. b). The plural occurs also in the phrase ūnī et alterī, one party and the other (the ones and the others).


The plural forms are regular -- same as you'd get with magnus. So it would be uni reges (in the nominative).

Thanks for help.

How do you declinate plural uni?
Singular genitive and dative have forms unius and uni.
Is it:
m. pl.
1. uni
2. unorum
3. unis
4. unos
6. unis
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Postby adrianus » Sun Sep 28, 2008 3:39 pm

In this way (it's regular in the plural)...
Declinatur ità (aequale hoc adjectivum cum pluralis numeris est)...
Casus singulis numeri (generis masculini, feminini, neutrius)
Nominativus unus una unum
Vocativus une una unum
Accusativus unum unam unum
Genitivus unius unius unius
Dativus uni uni uni
Ablativus uno una uno
Casus pluralis numeri (generis masculini, feminini, neutrius)
Nominativus uni unae una
Vocativus uni unae una
Accusativus unos unas una
Genitivus unorum unarum unorum
Dativus unis unis unis
Ablativus unis unis unis
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Postby Boban » Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:11 pm

adrianus wrote:In this way (it's regular in the plural)...
Declinatur ità (aequale hoc adjectivum cum pluralis numeris est)...
Casus singulis numeri (generis masculini, feminini, neutrius)
Nominativus unus una unum
Vocativus une una unum
Accusativus unum unam unum
Genitivus unius unius unius
Dativus uni uni uni
Ablativus uno una uno
Casus pluralis numeri (generis masculini, feminini, neutrius)
Nominativus uni unae una
Vocativus uni unae una
Accusativus unos unas una
Genitivus unorum unarum unorum
Dativus unis unis unis
Ablativus unis unis unis


I thought there isn't vocative form?
In book that I learn from there isn't.
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Postby adrianus » Mon Sep 29, 2008 12:11 am

Boban wrote:I thought there isn't vocative form?
In book that I learn from there isn't.
Nor is it in my books and I've always wondered why not. "Ô numere une! (Oh, number one! What a nice number you are!)" Maybe one does say, "Ô numere unus!". It's not unusual that I should be wrong and could do with correction.
Meis libris etiam deest et semper me rogo quâ ratione? "Ô numere une! Ut bellus numerus es!" Fortassè quidem dicis, "Ô numere unus!" Saepè erro et corrigendus sum.
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Postby Twpsyn » Mon Sep 29, 2008 1:06 am

Lewis and Short says:

voc. une, Plaut. ap. Prisc. p. 673 P.; Cat. 37, 17; cf. Varr. L. L. 8, § 63 Müll.; Aug. Conf. 1, 7


In other words, yes there is a vocative. It is both regularly formed and quite rare, so I am not surprised a basic textbook would omit it.
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Postby Boban » Mon Sep 29, 2008 12:38 pm

Twpsyn wrote:Lewis and Short says:

voc. une, Plaut. ap. Prisc. p. 673 P.; Cat. 37, 17; cf. Varr. L. L. 8, § 63 Müll.; Aug. Conf. 1, 7


In other words, yes there is a vocative. It is both regularly formed and quite rare, so I am not surprised a basic textbook would omit it.

That makes sense. :roll:
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