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Translation of "fortitudo iuvenum"

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Translation of "fortitudo iuvenum"

Postby Boban » Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:08 pm

Can someone translate me "fortitudo iuvenum"?
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Postby Gonzalo » Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:34 pm

The strenght of the young people.
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby timeodanaos » Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:57 pm

The courage of the young people.
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Postby Boban » Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:59 pm

Gonzalo wrote:The strenght of the young people.


You have translated "iuvenum" as young people.
I guess that "iuvenum" is genitive plural of "iuvenis, is, m." but that would mean that it must be "iuvenium".
That's why I asked, because I am not sure that "iuvenum" (as in book) is type error. It should be "iuvenium" I think.
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Postby Gonzalo » Thu Sep 04, 2008 3:48 pm

As a noun, it is iuvenum for genitive plural. As an adjective, it is iuvenium.
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Boban » Thu Sep 04, 2008 8:35 pm

Gonzalo wrote:As a noun, it is iuvenum for genitive plural. As an adjective, it is iuvenium.


But if you reffering to noun "iuvenis, is, m." then genitive plural is "iuvenium" because iuvenis, is, m. is parisyllaba with genitive -is, so belongs to III-i declination.
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Postby Gonzalo » Thu Sep 04, 2008 8:38 pm

Hi,
I have learnt it by usage and not by grammar rules but I found anyway in my Latin lexicon what I have referred to and, besides, I have found the next reference -I have just written "iuvenis" at Google:
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/iuvenis Take a look.

Regards,
Gonzalo
Verus enim amor semper tempore tristi elucescit magis. (Philipp Melanchthon: Decl. de studiis Linguæ Græcæ)
Quin age, si quid habes (P. Vergilii Maronis Ecloga III:52)
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Postby Boban » Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:20 pm

Gonzalo wrote:Hi,
I have learnt it by usage and not by grammar rules but I found anyway in my Latin lexicon what I have referred to and, besides, I have found the next reference -I have just written "iuvenis" at Google:
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/iuvenis Take a look.

Regards,
Gonzalo


Hm, I am puzzled, I expected that "iuvenis, is, m." belongs to III-i declension but on that site stands that it belongs to consonant base not vocal -i base.
Maybe someone can also verify this.
Rules for III-i declension is that noun is parisyllaba with singular nominative ending -is and singular genitive ending -is.
This is first noun I see that it's not regular to this.
Difference betwen III declension and III-i declension is only in genitive plural ending.
Last edited by Boban on Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Alatius » Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:21 pm

Boban wrote:But if you reffering to noun "iuvenis, is, m." then genitive plural is "iuvenium" because iuvenis, is, m. is parisyllaba with genitive -is, so belongs to III-i declination.

The word "juvenis" is an exception to this rule, as is "canis".
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Postby Twpsyn » Thu Sep 04, 2008 10:49 pm

Boban wrote:Difference betwen III declension and III-i declension is only in genitive plural ending.


No, there are other differences: full i-stems have m/f plural nom-acc in Ä«s, singular acc in im, and singular abl in Ä«. Full i-stems with these endings are rare, but even mixed i-stems have neuter plural nom-acc in ia and often singular abl Ä«. Canis and iuvenis are two among a few nouns that look like they should be i-stems but are not (they also have singular abl in e, not Ä«). Check a grammar for more comprehensive listings.
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