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succinct feedback/retroactiones compendiariae

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succinct feedback/retroactiones compendiariae

Postby adrianus » Tue Aug 19, 2008 6:47 pm

I'm looking for on-screen feedback text that is clear and succinct for a Latin game. Any suggestions on the following?
Oportet indices retroactiones in quadro quas ludo meo latinè quaeso esse compendiarias clarasque. Quid de his putatis?
Malleis/clavibus gubernare (Key controls):
w = prorsum (forwards)
s = rursum (backwards)
a = sinistrorsum (left)
d = dextrorsum (right)
t = quod lusor vidit (what the player sees)
Regula spatium (SPACE bar)= salire (jump)
Malleus/clavis mandatum (CMD key Mac / ALT PC) = currere (run)
Globulus sinister (left mouse button) = pugnare (fight)
Globulus dexter (right mouse button) = saltare (dance)
->| TAB = inspicere et colligere (to examine and collect)

To collect things, click and drag into this area. To use them, drag out.
Ad colligendum, in re deprime et in hoc locum trahe. Ad utendum, extrahe.
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Postby adrianus » Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:22 pm

Will no one say? Does no response mean "don't know" or "don't care"?
Nemóne dicis? Ut ait Cicero (Ad Familiares), "utrum nescis, an pro nihilo id putas?"
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Postby bedwere » Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:01 pm

Non sum lusor, sed mihi videtur te bene fecisse. :D
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Postby adrianus » Sat Aug 23, 2008 9:02 pm

Gratias tibi, Bedwere.
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Postby MiguelM » Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:54 am

In ludum quem, Adriane, haec appones? Ostendebisne? Multi forsan aliquid Latini discant si ad bene ludendum oporteat! ;x
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Postby adrianus » Sun Aug 24, 2008 5:40 am

I will, MiguelM, in time. So far I've demonstated elements only at conferences ( www.isaga2007.nl/uploads/final%20papers/p13-def.pdf and Google: "adrian mallon" + latin). A lot remains to be done but things are looking good so far.
Noli solicitari, MiguelM. Eum omnibus tempore ostendam. Solùm in colloquiis paucas partes iam demonstravi. Ludus magnam operam requiret ut finiturus sit, at bellê adhúc.

Vide etiam
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Postby Scribo » Sun Aug 24, 2008 2:11 pm

A game? Please elaborate =D
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Postby thesaurus » Mon Aug 25, 2008 2:17 am

My only question is whether keys like "pugnare" should be imperatives, because in a way you're telling your 'avatar' to do these things by pressing keys. I noticed Vicipaedia stays with the infinitives, but some other languages choose imperatives (e.g. "search" button).
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Postby Alatius » Mon Aug 25, 2008 1:07 pm

I was thinking about the distinction between mouse buttons and keys on a keyboard. Functionally they are equivalent (i.e. their purpose is to be pressed, which in turn sends information to the computer), yet they have, for historical reasons, different names in English, and no doubt many other languages. Some languages have the same word, however; for example, in German, if I'm not mistaken, they are both Tasten.

Is the distinction necessary to uphold in Latin, and if so, is malleus/clavis vs. globulus the best words? Specifically, are the buttons on the mouse more akin to "small balls", than are the keys on the keyboard? I don't know what the best solution is, but it might be something to think about. Some other words that might be suitable for either meaning are pulsabulum (my favourite) and malleolus. In either case, you could specify globulus/pulsabulum/etc. muris to make it clearer what is meant.

What is the syntax of the constructions regula spatium and malleus/clavis mandatum?
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Postby adrianus » Tue Aug 26, 2008 12:29 am

Alatius wrote:I was thinking about the distinction between mouse buttons and keys on a keyboard. ...Is the distinction necessary to uphold in Latin, and if so, is malleus/clavis vs. globulus...In either case, you could specify globulus/pulsabulum/etc. muris to make it clearer what is meant...What is the syntax of the constructions regula spatium and malleus/clavis mandatum?
I want to maintain a Romance distinction, Alatius: Spanish botón, tecla; French bouton touche; Italian bottone tasto.
Distinctionem, Alati, Romanicam tenere volo.

True enough, muris is clear, but it sounds like a definition, rather than snappy. "Muris" would be unnecessary if the button/key distinction stuck. (Chicken and egg?)
Usum "muris" nominis sensus clarior quidem faciet, at displicet quòd simile definitionis sonat et quòd longior est, ut opinor. Si distinctio inter globulum et clavem obtinebit, "muris" nominem non requiret. (Gallina et ovum?)

regula spatium & malleus/clavis mandatum/jussum
I'm suggesting appositive nouns here (I could have suggested an appositional genitive).
Cum his, nomina appositivos propono. Aliter genitivum appositivum casum proposuisse locò potui.

Thesaurus, I think a complementary infinitive or infinitive of purpose (instead of genitive of gerund and gerundive) and abstract association (Allen & Greenough, §§456,460,504,n2) fits here, unless you disagree.
Nisi dissentis, Thesaure, meâ sententiâ infinitivum complementarium (vel propositivum [?]) hîc aptum est.

Scribo, see the links I gave.
Vide nexus quos suprà dedi.
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