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Help with my plan to learn Latin

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Help with my plan to learn Latin

Postby japhmi » Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:56 pm

My wife and I are both wanting to learn Latin (and later, Greek, but first things first).

I took a year of college Latin using Wheelock's 6th edition (I still have my copy). She has very little Latin experience (she knows some Latin prayers). We've been trying to start out with the Dowling method, but it can get quite tedious around the 4th declension.

We're also going to be starting our homeschooled 1st grader out with Prima Latina from Memoria Press this next fall. We are tentatively planning on keeping her with their texts (with supplements). Which means eventually buying Henle Latin when older.

So, after having lurked around on this site for years, I have registered and I'm asking for advice as to how to proceed to learn Latin

1. Follow Dowling + Lingua Latina, no matter how painful it seems now.
2. Get a normal textbook, and just do that (probably Wheelock or Henle)
3. Get a normal textbook, but work in Lingua Latina as a supplement.

If you suggest 2 or 3, what book would be best to use.

Thanks in advance for all of the great advice!
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Postby Lucus Eques » Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:02 pm

Dowling is good and helpful, but only if you really want to do it. Lingua Latina is fundamentally all you really need. The Dowling method can be very helpful for reinforcement later on.
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Postby Twpsyn » Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:19 pm

This Dowling method? I've never heard of this before, but my gut reaction is: ugh, how gruesome. Memorizing all the accidence before reading any Latin? You learn all the forms through Lingua Latina on its own, and it's a lot more engaging than chugging through charts. The only disadvantage to solo learner(s) like you is the lack of English, and that's what the explanatory companion texts to Lingua Latina are for.
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Postby Amadeus » Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:32 pm

Yes, Dowling + Lingua Latina. That's how I learned Latin. You could do the Dowling exercises before reading LLPS, or as you progress through the lessons. I disagree with Lucus here about not really needing these supplementary exercises. If you were to study this book in a classroom environment, or if the stories in LLPS were considerably longer and heavily repetitive, then I'd say yes, you probably don't need them. But since you don't have either, external aids are necessary. You could also buy the helpful Exercitia, the exercise companion book.

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Postby Lucus Eques » Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:42 pm

Sure, get the supplements if you want them; everything Ørberg has put out through Domus Latina is phaenominally good.
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Postby Essorant » Fri Jul 04, 2008 6:17 am

Latin Via Ovid<pre></pre>
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Postby metrodorus » Fri Jul 04, 2008 10:32 am

I would also recommend downloading Adler's textbook , and the textbook's key, and , printing it up section by section (don't use chapter one, though) using it with each other - it is perfect for two people, as it works on a question-answer format, meaning that you take turns asking each other the questions, and answering, until they become second nature.

Your Latin will increase rapidly, and, besides, the method is highly enjoyable, as it is very social.
By the end of the course, you will be able to speak Latin to each other, which will increase your reading fluency tremendously.

The Latinum podcast accompanies the book, and you might find that useful as well:

http://latinum.mypodcast.com

There is a link to google books copy of Adler on the latinum site.
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Postby G82. » Mon Jul 07, 2008 5:52 pm

The best textbook I've ever worked with is: Latin: An Intensive Course, Floyd L. Moreland and Rita M. Fleischer. The only down side is that there is no answer key for the exercises but most of the answers could be found here: https://moodle.carleton.edu/course/view.php?id=6843 (it's quite a messy little site but it helps). Good luck!
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Postby Interaxus » Tue Jul 08, 2008 2:43 am

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Postby G82. » Tue Jul 08, 2008 8:09 pm

I'm sorry the link was not helpful, I posted it because it is the only form of an answer key I've been able to find and thought, "something is better than nothing!"

Well done for spotting the "quam" mistake.

About your question: I admit, sentence 13 is rather confusing. "Suus-a-um" is used as a reflexive possessive adjective and, as you correctly noted, it refers back to the subject of the sentence or clause in which it is found. However, it is possible for "suus-a-um" to sometimes refer to the subject of its own clause (in Relative, Causal, Temporal and Result clauses), or to the subject of the main verb (in Indirect Statement, Question and Command where there is a verb of "saying", "thinking", etc. "suus" refers to the subject of that verb). This said, it doesn't really solve our problem because we have two simple clauses joined with a conjunction. One possible way out is to say, "but gifts were sent to his (unhappy man's) mother by his friend." Then in all instances a form of "suus-a-um" would be used. But I guess that's not the point of the exercise. So, let's go back to some basics.

The difference between "is-ea-id" and "suus-a-um" is that the former cannot be used reflectively. Ergo, if we say "eum matrem", this cannot be the friend's mother so she's probably the unhappy man's. I know this is not as precise as Latin normally is, but I'd blame the awkwardness of the sentence.

Regarding the extent to which you can trust the answer key, well - as much as you can trust me or anyone else online. Judging by your last post, you are quite capable of sorting out the right from the wrong. Keep at it!
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Postby Interaxus » Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:45 pm

G82: Don't get me wrong. I found the link very useful. It's packed with useful things. It's just that I had hoped for keys to more of the exercises (since the course itself has been highly praised).

Thank you for summarizing the rules concerning reflexive pronouns and adjectives!

I assume 'eum matrem' is a typo and that you really meant (ad) 'eam matrem'.

But that would not express 'his mother', would it? (It would mean 'that mother'). Since we may not use (ad) 'suam matrem', surely we have to fall back on (ad) 'eius matrem' (which perhaps is what you meant to write after all).

At least you seem to be with me in spirit! :lol:

Hopefully some Latin guru up there will beam him-/her-self down to us and settle the matter once and for all.

Cheers,
Int
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Postby G82. » Tue Jul 08, 2008 11:56 pm

Hahaha, I'm so silly! "Eius matrem" it is. I hope... ;)
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