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greek word for interesting

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greek word for interesting

Postby Cyborg » Mon Jun 23, 2008 9:56 pm

Hi everybody,

How do I say interesting in Ancient Greek?

Here´s my research (using woodhouse´s online dict):
interesting: epagogos, prosagogos
alluring: epholkos
entertaining: geloios

then I decided to try another way. So I looked up "interesting" on whitaker words. nothing. but iucundus is: pleasant/agreeable/delightful/pleasing.
So I looked up those four words on woodhouse again.

all 4 have: hedys
pleasant and delightful also have: terpnos
agreeable and pleasing also hve: arestos

All I wanted is a word which is closest to meaning "arousing or holding the attention".
It´s amazing to me that this is such a hard word (for me at least) to find an equivalent to, and also it amazes me that this word does not derive from the word for "attention".

Also, how could I use greek to make a compound word meaning "one who seeks interesting things" ? hydezeteon?
The "interesting things" part I bet all I have to do is put it on neuter nominative plural (if Greek works like Latin where "bona" is "good things" for instance)

Any help is appreciated.
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Postby Rufus Gulielmus » Mon Jun 23, 2008 11:17 pm

I'm sorry I've got no help for you as far as finding the word for "interesting" is concerned, but I do know that Greek does make use of substantives quite a bit. i.e., you can get away with just the definite article plus the neuter plural of "interesting" to express "interesting things."

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Re: greek word for interesting

Postby annis » Tue Jun 24, 2008 12:18 am

William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
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Postby Cyborg » Tue Jun 24, 2008 8:37 pm

Thanks for the suggestions.
It is indeed interesting that the Greeks and Romans perhaps did not find anything interesting :)
Annis, have you ever come across any Greek authors mentioning that something is interesting?
I wanted to find the word that they used to mean "interesting", not something we modern people can do with, but maybe their word for that did not exist really.
Did they ever use hedys or terpnos for "interesting"?
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Postby vir litterarum » Tue Jun 24, 2008 9:29 pm

vir litterarum
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Postby Lucus Eques » Wed Jun 25, 2008 1:52 am

Can you give me the basic link for that dictionary, vir?
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Postby Bert » Wed Jun 25, 2008 2:07 am

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Postby annis » Wed Jun 25, 2008 3:35 am

William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
τίς πατέρ' αἰνήσει εἰ μὴ κακοδαίμονες υἱοί;
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Postby ThomasGR » Wed Jun 25, 2008 5:16 am

Starting with diaforos, can we not make endiaferon for interesting, adiaforos for uninterested? We may so get off the nuance of the difference that diaforos has. I wonder why endiaferon was not used for interesting in ancient Greek.
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Postby annis » Wed Jun 25, 2008 11:31 pm

Cyborg wrote:It is indeed interesting that the Greeks and Romans perhaps did not find anything interesting :)


I'm sure they did. In modern English, at least, "interesting" covers quite a range, from "noteworthy" to "arousing attention" or even "unexpected." I often use the word in a negative sense, to describe the mysterious behaviors computer exhibit.

So rather than not finding things interesting, they chose words to describe the nature of the interest.

Annis, have you ever come across any Greek authors mentioning that something is interesting?


I can't say that I have. My reading is still mostly poets rather than philosophers or historians.

Did they ever use hedys or terpnos for "interesting"?


I've never seen it, as far as I recall.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
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Postby Cyborg » Wed Jun 25, 2008 11:58 pm

hey ThomasGR, would you mind explaining to me how you went from diaforos to endiaferon? thats interesting because modern greek does use endiaferon for interesting. also, i´d love if you could explain how endiaferon does not carry the "difference" connotation that diaforos has.
(does "different" come from "diaforos"? hmm...)

Annis, the nature of the type of interesting that I needed was the kind that arouses attention only.
And thanks for the other dictionary, i did not know that one.
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Postby annis » Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:13 am

Cyborg wrote:Annis, the nature of the type of interesting that I needed was the kind that arouses attention only.


ἀξιόλογος might be another candidate for that.
William S. Annis — http://www.aoidoi.org/http://www.scholiastae.org/
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Postby ThomasGR » Thu Jun 26, 2008 7:40 am

Cyborg wrote:hey ThomasGR, would you mind explaining to me how you went from diaforos to endiaferon? thats interesting because modern greek does use endiaferon for interesting. also, i´d love if you could explain how endiaferon does not carry the "difference" connotation that diaforos has.
(does "different" come from "diaforos"? hmm...)


It is modern Greek. I had always wondered about the connections of diaforos, adiaforos, diaforetiko and endiaferon, endiaferomai. Though diaforetiko has the meaning of different, in endiaferomai it is not anymore present. But again, if we make the precise analysis, it does, though no one is aware of it. What could be the precise meaning of endiaferomai, without using the word interesting?
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Postby Interaxus » Sat Jun 28, 2008 12:19 am

Lucus:

I suppose by now you’ve discovered you can download the Woodhouse English-Greek dictionary (drive space permitting) from:
http://www.archive.org/details/englishg ... t027453mbp

Courtesy of Google Books / Internet Archive.

[Off topic: What a lot of words there are for ‘kill’! Well, of course, English and Latin have their fair share :cry: .]

Incidentally, everybody, seen this?
http://perswww.kuleuven.be/~u0013314/greekg/diction.htm

Cheers,
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Postby Cyborg » Wed Jul 02, 2008 9:06 pm

thanks for the help everyone, and interaxus - thanks for the links, i did not know the dict was available standalone.
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